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NEWTON.

Tho nomination for tlie Newton electoral district took place at .noon to-day. There ' were about 100 persons present. ' >'" _ Mr E. P. Hulme, Returning Officer, pre- . sided. Having read the writ and the advertisement notifying tho election, he then called upon persons who desired ts nominate 1 candidates. '■'* A

Mr Thomas T. Masefield came forward ; j and proposed Mr Thomas Peacock as a fit "-A, and proper person to represent Newton in ', the House of Representatives (cheers). He m believed that in him they had an honS&t ; ; gentleman of sound Liberal views. He had ; been twice Mayor of Auckland, ahd during '.: his term of office he had w-orked hard in'the IS interests of the people. He had secured the m Albei-t Park for the people, and civic con- jj3 trol of the Domain. He had always put his Aj~ money into the local industries of the place, y; and in so doing had assisted to provide work -.vj for the labouring classes. He had alwayS. _ .£ advocated the support and extension of woe' educational system, and had taken a great y| interest in the city schools. He had alspy^ shown a determination to protect the inter?. »fi| ests of this part of the colony iit'rnilway _ ' works. He was a resident afiiongst them, . •." and as such he deserved their support. , "" -"' ' " 11 __________

them, whom they could always get at, and wlio would be always in accord with tlie electors. Mr James Conplaml said they wanted in tho House a man of ability, education, and integrity. Ile thought that in Mr Peacock thoy had a man of more than average ability, lie was posted lip in all the moving questions of public importance of the day. He was a man of integrity, and there was no blemish on his character. Ho had never given a blind support to any leader, but lie always worked for the best interests of his constituency and the colony. A great deal had been said about "rats," but ho considered it was an honour to be called a rat if it meant that a man thought for himself and acted according to his best judgment in the interests of the people. He had much pleasure in seconding Mr Peacock's nomination. Mr Gulliver nominated Mr William George Garrard. His reason for doing so was that tho electors, at a crowded meeting, had accorded hint a vote of confidence, and if it was only to give those people an opportunity of recording their votes, ho would nominate him. Mr John Currie .seconded. Mr Cowden nominated Mr Cecil Albert Do Lautour as a tit and proper person to represent the district. Ho did so without any remarks. Mr Osborne seconded. The candidates were then called upon to address the meeting. ' Mr De Lautour was the first speaker. He said there was one unpleasant feature in connection with a contest of this kind, and that was that someone must lose. They could not all win. Ho agreed with his friend, Mr Coupland, that they should have men of ability and integrity, but they should also have principles. If they were n Conservative constituency they should put in a man according to their views; and if a Liberal electorate, the return of a Liberal candidate should be ensured. He had come here determined to make friends with everyone—newspapers, l'eacockitos, Garrardites, and everyone else. He agreed with all that had been said by Mr Peacock's proposer nnd seconder concerning that gentleman's ability, and the constituency was indeed lucky to have a candidate of his ability, but one who might do better, and possibly be on tho losing side. He would meet tho .electors again on Monday evening next, stud would deliver a practical address without glamour. Mr W. G. Garrard next came forward, .and explained his reasons for contesting tho seat. It was said at last elections that iio had shown the white foather by retiring from City North, but ho would not retiro jww. Ho objected to tho unfair maimer in which tho working man was constantly itemg treated. Mr Thomas Peacock said he had already given a clear exposition of his viows, and it «ns unnecessary for him to repeat what ho said. Ho gave Mr Do Lautour credit for tho ability to represent any constituency in the House, but what he objected to was that he liad come to the wrong place to seek election. Ho sliouJd have gono to another district where he was wore identified with tho interests of the people. He thought they should have a local man to represent them, hence he asked for their support. He thought a groat (leal of misapprehension existed on the subject of land tax yersus property tax. Ho considered that wealth Should be taxed, and compelled to bear its /share of the burdens of tho country. Under the present tax increased value given to the land by public expenditure was compelled to pay » portion of the outlay. Ho trusted tho working mon of Newton would not oppose him because lie objocted to a <tsy. which would bo more to his benefit than (the ono at prosont imposed. Tho working jm,en sJhjulu not endeavour to do away witn the property tax, from the payment of ivjiicn they were really exempted. He pointed out tijo large exemptions which tho working men secured under tho property tax, and askod if thoy were anxious to re. liove tho wealthy of their taxes on their (Carriages and similar luxuries? (Cheers.) He was convinced that tho " unearned increment" system would react upon the working njeo themselves, as his improved homestead would bo littlo for him, and he would become a tenant of the State. Mr Peacock read his original political programme, and said that if elected he would endeavour to servo them faithfully. A show of hands was taken, with tho following .result :— MrT. Peacock .46 Mr De Lautour H4

Mr Garrard ..,, ... ... 2 The /.nnonncomeiit vas received with loud applause. Mr t)e £41. tour demanded a poll. The proceedings closed with a vote of thanks to tho returning officer, proposed by Mr Peacock and seconded by Mr De Lautour. Cheers were given for tlio candidates.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18840716.2.15.7

Bibliographic details

NEWTON., Auckland Star, Volume XXVI, Issue 4422, 16 July 1884

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1,027

NEWTON. Auckland Star, Volume XXVI, Issue 4422, 16 July 1884

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