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The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1914. THE 1915 COCKSFOOT CROP.

It seems to be generally thought that the price of cocksfoot is going to be very poor for tbe 1915 season, but apparently there appears to be HO substantial reason, for this supposition. The Home market is practi cally a closed book as far as Peninsula cocksfoot sales are concerned, ac the Danish and other European countries have monopolised tbe English market. The effect of the war cannot rost-ibly make any difference to the local and Australian markets as far as cm be seen at present. The war should have the effect of opening the English once more to colonial pro ducers, as, no doubt, a good deal of European crop has either not been harvested or destroyed. There doas not, therefore, appear to be any reason why ! cocksfoot should not sell just as well this year. The main trouble in the cocksfoot industry on Bank 3 Peninsula is thb harvesting problem and the difficulty of getting the proper labour. There is no doubt this is the reason for many Peninsula farmers going out of the industry. We understand that a good deal less cocksfoot will be shut up again this year, but even SO, there will stiil be a large area, as it WoL'k3 SO well with tbe dairying industry, and provides winter feed for I the cows.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140915.2.5

Bibliographic details

Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 4429, 15 September 1914

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230

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1914. THE 1915 COCKSFOOT CROP. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 4429, 15 September 1914

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