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Irish News

ANTRIM— A Tribute to former Parishioners Most Rev. Dr. Tohill, Bishop of Down and Connor, made his visitation on Sunday, June {>, at Cushendall, County Antrim, the parish of which he was pastor before his elevation to the Episcopate. In the course of a feeling address his Lordship said that in no other parish was the great family duty of morning and night prayers more faithfully observed, also the saying of the Rosary at night, that delightful feature in the religious life of every truly Catholic home. The moral tone of the children in the parish was unsurpassed by that of the children of any other part of Ireland. Such conduct was a bright pearl in the diadem of the character of any people. He mentioned that trait •$ parochial character, as he considered it was the fruit of the religious home training of the children. CARLOW— Death of a Priest Deep regret was felt at the announcement of the death of the Rev. John Beauchamp, Borris, which occurred at tho Parochial House, Borris, County Carlow, on June 2. The deceased was in the 69th year of his age. CAVAN— Warning Against Disunion A public meeting was held on June 5 in the town <f Cavan in furtherance of a movement to erect a monument in honor of Owen Roe O'Neill and Myles the Shasher, whose deeds of daring and heroism are well known to students of Irish history. Special trains from Dublin brought a large number of excursionists to the demonstration, but only a comparatively small number of local Nationalists attended owing to the Bishop of Kilmore's strong disapproval of the demonstration. In the course of a letter condemning rho proposed meeting issued some days before it was held, his Lordship declared that it was being organised nominally to erect a monument to illustrious Irishmen, but really to entice young men to join secret societies, to weaken the Irish Party, and to create disunion. ' When the country is united,' his Lordship wrote, ' we can gain great measures of justice from the Government ; when disunion flourishes we can gain only trifling concessions.' It is but just to state (writes a Dublin correspondent) that some of the organisers of the demonstration wrote to the press protesting that they themselves were ■ opposed to secret societies, and stating that his Lordship was misinformed. This may be so, as far as the gentlemen referred to are concerned, but it may be taken for granted that Dr. Boylan, than whom no more patriotic or prudent prelate exists, would not issue a solemn warning to his people without good reason. CORK— Episcopal Jubilee The Most Rev. Dr. O'Callaghan, Bishop of Cork, will shortly celebrate his silver episcopal jubilee. In response to a numerously signed requisition, the Lord Mayor of the city and the Chairman of the County Council convened a meeting, which was held in the Municipal Hall, to take steps to commemorate the interesting event. A Secret and Deadly Influence Mr. Augustine Roche, M.P., Cork City, has sent the following letter to Mr. John Redmond, M.P. : ' Not having subscribed to the Parliamentary funds for some time past for reasons not necessary, to mention now, I have pleasure in enclosing cheque, value £50, to assist you in fighting for a United Ireland. In doing so I cannot refrain from calling the attention of my fellow-countrymen to the secret; and deadly influences which are being actively and insidiously used in order to destroy the United Parliamentary Party, and thereby kill the National Organisation in Ireland. The National issue at present is whether the country will have a united party or faction and dissension.' DUBLlN— Clongowes Union Speaking at the annual general meeting of the Clongowes Union on June 5, Sir William Butler availed of the opportunity to express his deep and sincere thanks for the honor which they had bestowed upon him eight or nine years ago by electing him vice-president. He could not easily describe to them the feelings with which he had heard that that honor had been conferred on him, because it came at a time when he was, unfortunately for himself, made the object of a considerable amount of disapprobation by a portion of the press of Great Britain', and, therefore, he received it as a special message of kindness and of confidence from that very important body. They, he might say, took him on trust, because the developments that afterwards occurred -in relation to an epoch in their recent history with which he had been associated, had not reached their climax. Concluding, he said if they maintained the traditions established by the Jesuit Fathers, they would

have lofty ideals to live up to in their future lives. Lord Chief Baron Palles, President of the Union, said he was glad that Sir William Butler had referred to the time when they had deemed it an honor to be allowed to elect hiu« one of their vice-presidents. They had not taken Sir William on trust— they knew him. They knew^the slanders that had been uttered against him, and they knew by What they knew of him that they must have been untrue. The details they knew not, but they knew the man, and by joining him with them as one of their vice-presidents they did all they could to express their opinion that there was not the slightest ground for these slanders, and that tha time would come when the irrefutable truth would prevail and the name of Sir William, Butler would be honored as the first name in the English army. Sir William had told the truth, and it was because he told the truth that a section of the English press thought it right to make an attack upon him. The truth had now prevailed, and they could congratulate Sir William Butler on having a name which, if it was not above, was at least equal to, any name in the country. LIMERICK— Death of a Well Known Lady The news of the death of Miss Charlotte Grace O'Brien, of Foynes, County Limerick, will be received with sorrow by Irishmen at home and abroad (says the Catholic Times). The daughter of the Young Ireland leader, William Smith O Brien, she inherited many of his fine qualities. To her self, sacrifices the Irish emigrants who go in such large numbers to the United States are deeply indebted for the improvements which have been made for their accommodation by the shipping companies. Years ago they were huddled together on board the vessels without regard to sex and had to endure many discomforts. But, thanks to Miss O'Brien's efforts the character of the steerage service was revolutionised, and for a considerable period it has been all that the most exacting could desire. The sympathies t f Miss O'Brien, who was a convert to the Catholic Church, went out with ardor to the poor, and every movement tending to the betterment of her countrymen's lot found in her a warm supporter. She was well known as a messenger of good tidings in the homes of many who were face to face with want, and her memory will be treasured in the great Republic of the West by emigrants whom she assisted and encouraged by voice and pen. The Freedom of the City At Limerick recently Dr. Douglas Hyde was" presented with the freedom of the city. Dr. Hyde was the recipient of a warm greeting when he arrived in Limerick, and :n the course of his speeches he referred to the work of the Gaelic League and the question of Irish in the new University. ' A Redemptorist Passes Away The death of the Rev. Albert Barry, C.SS.R., occurred at Mount St. Alphonsus, Limerick, after a lingering illness. He was educated at Castleknock College, and joined the Redemptorist Congregation in 1863, being ordainad priest in 1869. He was an eloquent preacher, and author of the lives of some Irish saints and other works. Father Barry, who was in his 67th year, was a native of Croom County Limerick, and was v brother of Mr. J Greere Barry, D.L., Sandville, and of Mr. N. Barry, National Bank, Limerick. The interment took place in the crypt of the Redemptorist Church at Mount St. Alphonsus after a Requiem Mass. LOUTH— St. Mary's College His Eminence Cardinal Logue opened recently an extensive new wing, of St. Mary's College-, Dundalk, which ts conducted by the Marist Fathers. In replying to an address his Eminence referred to the new National University. Whilst complaining that so far as legislation was concerntsd religion was ostracised at the institution, he spoke most eulogistically of the work of the Commissioners. had every reason to congratulate the learned judge who presided, the Archbishop who was Chancellor of the University, and all who co-operated. Under the guidance of the learned Senate, and with the grand body of laws whioh had been -drawn up for' their guidance, they would he trusted, be able to make the National University tolerable to Irish Catholics, an 4 would improve it as they went along. MEATH— Charitable Bequests Sir Reginald Aylmer Barnewall, of Crickstown Castle County Meath, and of 23, Cliveden Place, Eaton Square S.W., who died on April 18, aged 71, left personal estate in the United Kingdom valued at £10,759, of which £3696 was English estate. He bequeathed £200 each to Nazareth House, Hammersmith; the Convent of the Faithful Virgin, Norwood; the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm street, W. ; £100 to the Passionist Fathers Highgate; and £00 each to the Sisters of Mercy, Dublin the Sisters of the Assumption, and the Sisters of the Poor Bayswater, '

TIPPERARY—Proposed Testimonial At a public meeting of the people of Clonmel, presided over by Dr. Creen, it has been decided that the proposed testimonial to Very Rev. Canon Flavin, P.P., on the occasion of his golden jubilee, shoxild take the shape of an altar in the Church of SS. Peter and Paul, which lias been completed recently, owing largely to his great zeal and generosity. TYRONE— Unionist Intolerance At the annual meeting of the Tyrone County Council, held on June 8, the principal business was the election of president and vice-president, to which positions Unionists Avere elected. Mr. William Early, solicitor, said he did not rise to propose anybody else, because he knew it would l)e useless. He only wished to enter a protest on behalf of the people of his side of the table against the action of the council. He had nothing personally against Mr. Moore, and he did not want to oppose him, but there was a principle at stake, and he thought it was a perfect disgrace in a county like Tyrone, where a majority of the ratepayers were Nationalists and Catholics, that everything in connection with the County Council was given away to those ■who, nominally in a majority in the County Council, represented a minority. He only wished to say those few words to show that they did not sit down quietly and agree with -what had been done. Mr. John Donnelly said he desired to Bay a few words in respect to the way the Nationalist Party were treated generally on that council. He thought it was unfair that all the positions were held entirely by one section. The council preached tolerance, but, unfoi> tunately, so far as he could see, they had never practised it. WEXFORD— Cardinal Logue and the Evicted Tenants Cardinal Logue, in acknowledging a vote of thanks from Wexford Evicted Tenants' Committee for his Eminence's recent contribution in aid of the evicted tenants, states that he has very little claim. to thanks beyond fact that a bequest having been put at his disposal for evicted tenants, he decided to allocate it to Wexford, and lie was moved to that decision by the fact that when an effort, which ended so unfortunately, was made to restore some of the evicted tenants, Wexford contributed most generously, and whenever an appeal w r as made for a national or religious purpose he always found that Wexfovd gave a generous lead.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZT19090729.2.50

Bibliographic details

Irish News, New Zealand Tablet, 29 July 1909

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2,013

Irish News New Zealand Tablet, 29 July 1909

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