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Irish News

ANTRIM.-^Municipal Ownership At a recent, meeting of the Finance Committee of the Belfast Corporation the estimates for the coming year were under discussion, and it was decided that there would be no increase in the rates. This, is, no doubt, due to the financial prosperity of the gas and electric fuad, out of which the Corporation have actually drawn to the extent of about £18,000 or £19,000 in relief of the coming year's rates, while the same magnificent resources have afforded from £13,000 to £14,000 during the current year towards the payment of expenses which would otherwise have to be met out of the rates, thus necessitating no increase. CLARE.— LibeI Action In the action of Mr. Mclnerney, an auctioneer, of Ennistymon, who complained that he was libelled by 'The Clareman ' newspaper by publishing resolutions condemning him as a landgrabber, the jury gave the plaintiff £600 damages. CORK.— Market Gardening A syndicate has been formed in County Cork for the purpose of raising and cultivating vegetables, such as potatoes, cucumbers, tomatoes, etc., for the English markets in competition with the Channel Islands throughout the year. DONEGAL.— A New Church A new church, is to be built at Kilcar, County Donegal, in the diocese of Raphoe, for the Rev. A. M'Nelis. The church is designed in the Hiberno-Romanesqye style, and will afford accommodation for a congregation of 1500. It will consist of nave, aisles, two side chapels, chancel, sacristies, etc. DUBLIN. — A Successful Newspaper Under the able management of Mr. Thomas Sexton the 'Freeman's Journal' has become a very prosperous paper. When Mr. Sexton took, charge of the business the prospects were anything but hopeful. Thanks to his judiciouß management the business is now on a very sound basis, and at the last half-yearly meeting a dividend of 11 per cent, per annum, was declared. Glasnevin Cemetery When the consent of the family of the late Sir Charles Gavan Duffy was given that the remains should be taken to Ireland for interment it was felt by the people of Dublin that Glasnevin ought to be the last resting place of the deceased patriot. O'Connell, Parnell, and James Stephens, the Fenian Chief, are buried there. The body of a colleague of Duffy's in the young Ireland days, Terence Bellew MacManus, was brought all the way from San Francisco some 40 years ago to rest in Glasnevin. Thomas Davis is buried in Dublin, but in Mount Jerome, the Protestant cemetery. It is said that Sir Charles Gavan Duffy expressed a wish some years ago that his bones should mingle with the earth of the land he loved. The Parliamentary Party A meeting of the Irish Parliamentary Party was held on February 16 in the City Hall, Dublin. Mr. John E. Redmond was re-elected Sessional Chairman of the party. The officers and committees were also elected. A resolution in reference to the Land Conference was passed, as was also one expressing deep regret at the death of Sir Charles Gavan Duffy. GALWAY.— The New Archbishop Just a day or two before the last mail left It was reported in Dublin tihat the Most Ilev. Dr. Healy, Bishop of Clonfert, had been appointed Archbishop of Tuain. The new Archbishop (says the 'Freeman's Journal') has already a long record of brilliant service to his credit. Ho was amongst the foremost of one of the most brilliant of the generations of students whom the National College has trained for the Irish Church. ITis contemporaries at Maynooth have always recognised him as a man intellectually equipped to bo a leader in his time. For nearly 40 years after his ordination he gave up his great talents and his inexhaustible industry to the service of young Ireland in the schools. He was a great scholar and a great teacher. Those who sat beneath his chair at<,Athlone and at Maynooth remember with gratitude the teacher v\ho not merely convoyed knowledge, but elicited and fostered mental growth and development. Three-and-twenty years ago he achieved at Maynooth the distinction of winning two vacant Chairs in a double concur.Mis — the Chair of Rhetoric, or Classics, and a Chair of Theology. Two years later, on the foundation of the Royal University, he was chosen by the Senate for one of the First Fellowships, a position that he resigned when it was made apparent that the Senate would or could do no more for the encouragement of university studies at Maynooth — a work of prime importance to all the Irish nation— than bestow upon its staff a solitary Fellowship. When that able, theologian and accomplished writer. Dr. Murray— the friend and counsellor of Duffy — passed away. Dr. Healy succeeded him as Prefect of the Dunboyne. But the new Prefect's gifts of intellect and character were too marked not to expose Maynooth to his loss through a summons to a higher place in the Church of Ireland. When the failing health of the venerable Dr. Duggan necessitated the se-

lection of a Coadjutor for the diocese of Clonfert Dr Ilealy was appointed, with rights of successfon LIMERICK— A Large Salmon. • Abou * the middle of February Mr. P. Milbura fishman however, stuck gamefy to his rod and eventually tired out this splendid salmon, bringing him close to the boat where the fisherman safely^gaffed and landed t^v, £t » em fL brou « ht to tfa e scales he was found to g?rthss Inches* measuremen1 ' 8 being-length 50 inches* Land Purchase The tenants on the Ha,rnett estate, Knockbrack have offered to purchase their holdings at 18 years' on the valuation, but !t appears the tenants have refused to ?^ lbQtl of r ars on the rental, the terms demanded. In this respect the tenants are actinjr in the same manner as those on the Ellis estate, wheFe the TYRONE.— A Centenarian , TiT he ™ ath is 4 """"awed at Coagh, County Tyrone, of Mrs. Margaret Simpson, a widow, aged 104 years. WESTMEATH.— Accident on the Hunting Field. Major F. H. French, who was terribly injured by the fall of his horse while hunting with the Westmeath Hounds near Mulingar, died on February 14 yveßWUeawi GENERAL. Still a Home Ruler. w ! ri V H . erbert . Gladstone, addressing his constituents -In West Leeds, said he was still a Home Ruler Tory nostrums had been tried and failed. The stars in their courses were fighting for Home Rule and a practical scheme of autonomy for Ireland, and Ireland would not be satisfied without it. Emigration The number of emigrants who left Ireland during the quarter ended 31st December last was 7374 (3195 males and 4179 females), being 732 more than in the corresponding quarter of the year 1901, and 1867 over the JJ« ril f number for the fourth quarter of the ten years J 892-1901. Increase of Cancer Owing to reports which have been laid before the King- a-s to the increase of deaths from cancer in Ireland his Majesty has given special instructions that further inquiries should be made on the subject and the result reported to him at the earliest possible moment. It is stated that as compared with some years ago the number of deaths have increased threefold, and that the figures in 1902 are much in excese of those for 1901. Industrial Conference At a meeting of the general committee of the Irish Industrial Conference the report of the executive committee, together with the invitation form, was adopted. It is proposed to hold a Dublin Exhibition in connection with the Conference, and to consider the advisability of establishing an Institute of Commerce and Industry composed of representatives of the manufacturing and 1 trading interests of the four provinces. Captain Shawe-Tayior in Canada A message from Ottawa states that Captain ShaweTaylor, secretary of the Irish Land Conference, called on the Governor-General and Sir Wilfrid Laurier. Sir Wilfrid Laurier remarked that he considered the final settlement of the Irish Land Question on the lines of the recent conference would be a great boon to Ireland nnd the, whole British Empire. His Government would support a resolution in the Dominion Parliament favoring the proposed Irish settlement. Production of Honey The quantity of honey produced in Ireland in 1901 was nearly double the a\&rage quantity for the preceding 10 years. It was 15.2 per cent, above tlie quantity for the year 1900, the returns for which showed an increase of 1(5 4 per cent, as compared with the quantity in 1899. The quantity of honey produced, according to the returns, was 718.2181 b ; of this 188,330tb were produced in the province of Leinster ; 208,0571 bin Munster ; 197,7371 bin Ulster, and 124,0691 bin Connaught. Irish Minerals Many people do not realise that Ireland is particularly rich in marbles, as well as in building stone and materials generally. The Department of Agriculture has taken steps to place on view for a period of three months, at the Imperial Institute, the extensive collection of Irish minerals and building stones which formed one of the most interesting of its exhibits at the recent exhibition in Cork. The exhibit will include samples of the varied and excellent building materials and marbles of Ireland, and it is expected that the opportunity of examining these samples will be of advantage to those who are concerned in the many large building schemes now in progress in London and elsewhere in England. The excellence of the Irish granites, sandstones, and limestones, as well as of the red, green, and black marble

and the other ornamental stones of the country, when they were shown in the Department's exhibit at Cork, excited the admiration of all who saw them. The exhibit also includes specimens of clays, cement-making materials, and line sands, tin the mineral section of the exhibit are a series of prospectors' samples of the metalliferous deposits of the country, and samples of Irish cola and other minerals now being worked. A Successful Railway Company. The proceedings at the half-yearly meeting of the fJioat Southern and Western Railway of Ireland disclosed a very satisfactory state ol things in regard to the business of the company. Receipts enormously increased, and an increased dividend was the announcement contained in the chairman's speech. Of course, owing to the Cork Exhibition, the year may be regarded as an abnormal one, but nevertheless there ha\e been indications of improved trade in other directions. The chairman, Mr. W. J. Goulding, of Cork, referred to some other points which have been causing much discussion all over Ireland during the past year, for instance, the exclusic n of Catholics from practically all the higher posts in the service. This had become a scandal so notorious that it was taken up at the previous meeting, and, although facts and figures were given which could not be swept aside, an impotent attempt was made to discount the statements brought forward. The management immediately afterwards made a show of reforming the system by which the staff was secured, and decided that in future the clerkships should be obtained by comipetitive examinations. If such a system should be properly established and carried out there could be no reason tor complaint. As a matter of fact an examination of the list of shareholders of the G S W.ll. showed that the gre-ator part of the stock is owned by Catholics. Jt is only reasonable to expect that theso shareholders should insist that their co-religionists get fair play, in a word that they are not boycotted from all the" superior posts The management has tacitly admitted the charges that have been made, and it is to lie hoped that in a \ cry short tune every excuse for a icpetition of them shall ha\e been removed. The King's Influence I hoar on high authority (wi ltos the London correspondent of the Lnerpool Tost') that the policy of conciliation which the (!o\ eminent are pursuing in Ireland is due at lo.i'-t in some nieasuie to the influence of ( the King. I'is Maiesty is \ery anxious that the Irish question in all its branches should be put in train for settlement and it is rumoied in political circles that this was one of the subiocts discussed at the prolonged inter\iow which Mr lUIio-ir had with the King In whatever measuies ol a remedial c hat actor the Government proj oso for Ireland they may count on the strong suppoit of the SoM'iomn It is well Known that his Maiesty, (lifTciinn in tli.s i i^j i( t from th^ late Queen, is not unfrieudh to Home Rule I do not suppose that he will be able to j crsii,i<le the pi I'seiK Government to take any measure m that d rection, but his influence will be used in ta\or of a liboi.il conciliatoiy polirv towaids Ireland '\ bold and compi ohensn c Land Bill will be entnely 111 harmony with the wishes of the So\eroign and if' that lvea^uie lie accepted by the Nationalists, a Royal a i *- 1 1 to lie'.xnd in the early summer is certain The Kiiu is \oi v anxious to go to Irelan 1 this yeai , and spoiul two or three weeks in tho count iv (A cable message recei\ed last week stated that the Ro.\al \isit is to take place in .July or August and that tho announcement has aroused much enthusiasm in Ireland ) Automobile Race The 'Autocar' posithelv stales that there is no doubt as to Ihe holding of the 1 9<>:< Gordon-rennet t r,,ce in Ireland and that a Hill to legalise the holding of the e\cnt o\er a com se to bo chosen by the Automobile Club of Gieat ISntam and lieland will lie introduced Into Pailiameit as a Co\ci invent measiue eai Iv m the session Nothing couid be better than this ll v so doing tho present Go\ eminent will do much to wipe out the loproach that hangs to Legislatures for the lepnssion of the tiaflic industry in \ eai s gone by The petition in la\or of the race being hold m liela'nd has be< n ivtuinod signed by (amongst oUkms) — The Eail oi MiuiMcr the DuKo of Aberrorn. the Karl of Anneslev. \imount Diiiiumnon, Baron Mass\ . his Honor .ludge \\.-ilk<r Craig. County Couit Judge the Pight TTon C IT Ileinphin Pnvv Counnlloi Sir James Ilaslett MP for Noith Belfast T M Ileah. MP for'Noith I outh .lames L Carew, MP Ini South Meath .liyiiim.ili M.icVinuli, IMP foi South Down John P "Bolnnd. Fs>q M P lor South Ken v (who Mcih in Caelic) Captam Arthur Hill. M P for Vw>st Pow n r.ray Uihan Pistiut (ouncil. Lame Urban District Cowpdl V Coruwall-I'ra(K' Hartst ongo-M eld , .1 V Su Algernon Coi.to, premier bnionet of li eland (who lias also kindly sent it to his agent m li eland to obtain luithcr signatures).

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZT19030409.2.19

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Tablet, New Zealand Tablet, Volume XXXI, Issue 15, 9 April 1903

Word Count
2,453

Irish News New Zealand Tablet, Volume XXXI, Issue 15, 9 April 1903

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