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THE BO ER WA R.

NOTES AND POINTS OF INTEREST TO CATHOLIC READERS.

THE EX-MEMBER FOR WEST CLARE

Mr. Rochfort Maguire, the former member for West Clare, lost no time after getting out of Kimberley with Mrs. Maguire in leaving the Cape for England. He has made a big fortune in South Africa, and on his marriage with the daughter of \iscount Peel, former Speaker of the House of Commons, he settled £8000 a year upon her. He holds lS),0()0 shares in the Chartered Company

A BRAVE IRISH PRESSMAN.

A young Irish pressman, Mr. W. B. Knox, formerly on the staff of the Johannesburg Star, did a plucky and characteristic deed at the battle of the Modder River, he being engaged to follow the fortunes of the campaign on behalf of Heater's Agency. It rained bullets (says the Cape Argus) and a man's only chance of safety was to He prone upon the ground. One unfortunate Coldstream had his leg blown off, and hastening to the stretchers Mr. Knox besought their aid In taking- the wounded Tommy to the ambulance. They hesitated. 'We shall be all killed if we attempt the rescue,'' was the answer. Knox gallantly volunteered to take the lead if the others would follow, and encouraged by his example the party made a dash for the Coldstream Guard, whom they brought to a place of comparative safety.

IRISH OFFICERS KILLED AND WOUNDED.

In the list of officers killed and wounded in South Africa we find the names of many with Irish connections :— Lieutenant-Colonel William Aldworth, D.S 0.. killed, entered the army in H74, and first saw active service in the Burmese Expedition of 188.")-(I, when he acted as aide-de-camp and actingmilitary secretary to Sir Henry Prendergast. He was mentioned in despatches, and was awarded the D S.O. He was the eldest son of Colonel Robert Aldworth, of the North Cork Rifles, late captain of the i(4th Regiment. Captain Thomas Hugh Berney, who is reported to have been killed durinar General Buller's operations between February 15 and 18, belonged to the 2nd West Yorkshire Regiment. Captain Berney married in 18!>2 a daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel F. W. Bell, of the Stand House, near Ferinoy. Second-Lieutenant the Hon. William M-Ciintock Tlunbury, of the 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys), who has died of his wounds, was heir to a peerage, being the eldest son of Thomas, second Baron Rathdonnell, a representative Irish peer, by hi» marriage with

Katharine Anne, daughter of the Right Hon. Henry Bruen, P. 0., of Oak Park, County Carlow. He waa born on September 15, 1878, and entered the 2nd Dragoons from the Militia on January 4, 1899. Hiß death removes the heir to the Barony of Rathdonnell. Major-General Charles Edmond Knox, reported wounded, commanded the 13th Brigade South African Field Force. He served with the Bechuanaland Expedition under Sir Charles Warren in 1884-5, when he raised and commanded the 4th Pioneer Regiment. He waß born in 1846, educated at Eton, and the eldest son of the late Protestant Archbishop of Armagh, and Catherine Delia, daughter of Mr. Thomas FitzGibbon, of Ballyseeda, Couiity Limerick. General Knox is a bachelor and lives at Bedmin. Second-Lieutenant Walter Long, reported wounded, is slill young, being only in his 21et year. He is the eldest son of ihe Right Hon. Walter Hume Long, M.P., President of the Board of Agriculture, and the grandson of the Earl of Cork and Orrery, bis father having married Lady Dorothy Blanche Boyle, fourth daughter of the Earl. He wag born on July 26, 1870, and entered the 2nd Dragoons from the Militia on May 20 last.

CATHOLIC OFFICERS AMONG THE DEAD.

The following (says the Weekly Register of a recent date) is a list of Catholic officers who have lost their lives in the South African War :—: — Mr. E. J. Beaumont (Clongowes), volunteer from Natal Police, died in Ladysmith during the siege. Mr. Frederick Chadwick (Stonyhurst), Imperial Light Horse, died of wounds at Ladysmith, December. Colonel D. Scott Chisholme, sth Lancers, commanding Imperial Light horse, killed at Elandslaagte, October 21. Mr. J. Forrester Cunningham (St. Edmund's), Imperial Lifjht Horse, killed at Elandslaagte, October 21. Lieutenant Cornelius Joseph Daly (Downside). 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, killed in the Ladysmith relief operations, February 27. Captain Knapp, Imperial Light Horse, killed in a reconnaissance at Ladysmith, November 3. Major Francis Richard MacMullan (Tshaw), 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment, died from wounds received at Rensburg, February 15. Captain Francis Cochrane Loftus (Stonyhurst), Royal Inniskilling Fueiliere, killed at the Tugela, December l.">. Lieutenant-Colonel William M'Carthy-O'Leary (Stonyhurst), commanding lßt Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment, killed in the Ladysmith relief operations, February 27. Mr. Joseph Cuthbert Molony (Clongowes), Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry, killed at the Tugela, December 15. Lieutenant Francis Owen-Lewis (Beaumont), 14th Bombay Infantry, killed near Gras Pan, November 24. The Hon. Joseph H. L. Petre (Woburn, Ramsgate, and Downside), Captain Loyal Suffolk Hussars and Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry, killed on Spion Kop, January 24. Mr. Nicholas J. Walsh (Clongoweß), Baden Powell's Light Horse, killed at Mafeking, October 15. Mr. Hubert Joeeph Wolseley (Fort-Augustus), Imperial Light Horse, killed at Elandslaagte, October 21. To the above list might be added the name of Sir John Talbot Power, Bart., Colonel Spragge's Irish Yeomanry Battalion, whose death was reported in our last issue.

GENERAL BOTHA.

General Louis Botha, Acting-Commandant-General of the Transvaal forces, is the youngest General on the Boer side. He is only 36 yearß of age, and was born at Greytown, in Natal, Greytown being the chief town in the district of Umvoti. He sits for Vryheid in the First Volksraad. General Botha is a skilful tactician, and is possessed of great natural courage, while he gained much useful experience in the Kaffir wars. It is not generally known that General Botha is married to an Irish lady. Her name, curiously enough, is Emmet, and she is said to belong to the family which produced the two well-known United Irishmen of the same name. Botha is extremely well educated, and speaks English and other foreign languages fluently.

CATHOLIC OFFICERS IN SOUTH AFRICA.

The number of Catholic officers and volunteers at the front (says the London Globe} speaks well for the popularity of the Service among that body, as also for their keen desire to have a share in the fighting. Considerably over 250 officers of all rank, from chiefs in command, not counting Volunteer privates, are now in South Africa. Among the many notable names are those of Lieut.-Gen.-Clery, X.C.8., Maj.-Gen. Kelly-Kenny, C.8.. Maj.-Gen. Howard, OB , C.M.G., the Duke of Norfolk, Lords Gerard, Talbot, Granard, Norreys, O'Hagan, and Lovat. To these may well be added the Tipperary lad, Bugler Dunne, and Corpl. Nurse, of Colenso fame, who has been recommended for the Victoria Cross, and who was born at Eensal, New Town.

GENERAL SIR GEORGE WHITE.

The correspondent of the Sydney Morning Herald, who was in Ladyemith during the siege, gives the following pen picture of Sir George White : — ' You have by this time (he writes) seen many portraits of Sir George White, but not one in the least like the greyfaced, worn officer who came to receive the congratulations of the Mayor and citizens of Capetown. The general of the studio looks tall, straight, fresh, and springy, but the general of the siege ib at least 10 years older than any of his pictures — a stooped, patient, almost pathetic figure, stalking, cane in hand, through the streets of Ladysmith. When I first saw Sir George White, in the flush of the double victories of Dundee and Elands Laagte, he seemed to me even then an anxious man, quite unlike the trim, taut soldier of the illustrated papers, and that impression of him was intensified through each successive week of the long -strung ordeal.

THE PORT OF BEIRA.

The following description of the port of Beira from the Rev. Father Tiinoney appears in the Catholic Press :— There is a Catholic church, presbytery, convent and ho a pital in Beira. The district is in charge of the Franciscan Fathers from Portugal. They speak several languages, and tiro most laborious in trying to raise the population to the knowledge of the Christian religion. Three of our number, including the writer, were invited to dine with the Fathers on Good Friday. The change from the saloon of the steamer was a pleasant one, and although the 'menu' was scanty and meagre the brilliant conversation ot the Fathers went a long 1 way to make the afternoon one of the happiest we have ipent since we left our own country. The Franciscan Sisters, an order founded in India, direct the local hospital, which for order and cleanliness is not surpassed anywhere under the sun. Men of all colors and nations are tended here with the greatest care. I visited all the wards with our own Dr. Meredith, who is delighted with every arrangement. The Sisters are French, and wear no long faces. They shed happiness around. The gentle manners of these holy nuns would cure a man of any ordinary ailment within a few days. These Sisters never make grimaces at their patients, but move about among them like ministering angels, and bring to every face a smile of gratitude and affection. The rustle of the nun's white robes is a signal for every patient to rouse himself and salute the cheerful nurse as ehe glides along noiselessly to perform her charitable duties.

A DIFFERENCE OF OPINION.

The Rev. Dr. Kolbe has retired from the editorship of the South, African Cath n lio Magazine, which he had conducted with much ability for a number of years. The war is the cause of his retirement, and he gives his reasons in the following note : • I regret to say that I have felt impelled to resign the editorship of this magazine. Some time ago I claimed freedom of speech on behalf of my country's cause. As long as it was denied me, with whatever circumstances of insult, only by my fellow-clergy or by the laity, I protested that I should go on my way, but that on the slightest hint from my superiors I should resign. Now that some of the Bishops have taken an open stand for what is to me the cause of injustice, lam bound to fulfil my pledge. Their action ties my hands as editor ; therefore lam editor no longer. I can understand the Church pleading for peace or interposing for the oppressed, but I cannot understand the Church shouting with the mob for annexation. It is my firm belief that when the Ark of God is taken into the battle, the result is always disaster. Of course, the Bishops of whom I Bpeak look at things in a totally different light. Ido not for a moment suppose that they think their action even doubtful. All the more must they blame me. I yield to the implied censure. Arrangements will be made for the continuance of the magazine by other hands. To my many friends I send out heartfelt gratitude for all their kindness and sympathy. To my country's enemies, and, therefore, mine, who are probably glad to see my position made untenable, I have nothing to say. So, valet e omnes.'

THE BOER AS SEEN BY AN AUSTBALIAN.

1 On my rounds in hospital (writes a chaplain in the} Methodist Churchman') I came across an Australian whose leg was broken by an explosive bullet. He relates an incident which shows how some Boers, however, are humane and even chivalrous. He was lying between two rocks unable to move with his broken leg. A young well-dressed Boer came up to him, and in faultless English said, "Are you much hurt, old man?" The Australian trembled and blanched, for he expected treachery, and prepared his mind for a pistol shot. " Oh, don't be afraid of me, I won't hurt you, you are hurt enough already. Shall I get you a drink of water ?" "If you please." No sooner was it said than done. " Now, I have two peaches in my pocket, will you have those ?" " Thank you very much," and a further benison was bestowed. "You must be very faint there with this sun pouring down on you." And the young Boer sat on the rock that the shadow of his body might fall on hia wounded foe, and sat so for one hour and a half. Meanwhile ths two discussed politics, the Boer declaring that in the long run the English would overwhelm the Boers, but in the meantime the price they would pay for victory would be appalling, and the Australian, under the mesmerism of sympathetic succor, almost regretting he had left Australia to fight against a foe so noble as the young Boer beside him was. An ambulance came along and the chivalrous Burgher completed his service by gently lifting his companion on to the stretcher, and hoping he would be soon quite well again. Individual instances of this kind rebuke a general condemnation of the Boer race.'

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZT19000621.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE BOER WAR., New Zealand Tablet, Volume XXVIII, Issue 25, 21 June 1900

Word Count
2,164

THE BOER WAR. New Zealand Tablet, Volume XXVIII, Issue 25, 21 June 1900

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