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ST. JOSEPH'S SCHOOL.

THI annual breaking-up of this school took place on Friday evening, in the presence of the Rev Fathers Lynch, Adm , Hunt, Murphy, P. O'Neill, and Byan, and a large gathering of the laity.— An elaborate programme had been prepared, and the performance was excellent. The following was the programme : Piano, " The wearing of the green"; chorus, "Auld lang syne"; recitation, lint standard, "Watching for Father"; piano, "Thy voice is near"; chorus, "Dreaming of home"; piano, "Andante in 0"; recitation, seoond standard, " Grandfather's spectacles" ; piano duet, 11 La ci darem " ; solo and chorus, " Starlight on the quiet river " ; piano, Kuhlau's Andantino ; recitation, third standard, " Papa's letter " ; chorus, « Over the snow " ; piano, " Sweetbriai " ; vocal solo, "Beautiful bird, the spring is near"; piano, "Bigoletto"; chorus, « Silver lake."— Part 11.-Drama in three acts, •• The Ghost of the Elm Grove." Vocal chorus, " Home, sweet home." The selections for the piano were extremely well played, and in every instance very good. Both solos and choruses were given without accompaniment, and the harmony and pitch were admirably sustained. The recitations were simultaneous and nothing could be better. Every word was distinct and clear, and the expression most intelligent. In the drama the girls did their parts capitally. A ballet introduced into this play gave it quite a classic tone. The children went very prettily through their evolutions ahd dances, and the introduction of some grotesque variations performed by an old cottager, a negro, and one or two more remarkable characters, added merriment to the scene. On the conclusion of the play, the Bey Father Lynch made a ■hort address. He said : Friends, I have been requested by his Lordship the Bishop to apologise for bis unavoidable absence this evening. He is now engaged in examining the Oamaru Catholic schools, and will not return till to-morrow evening. . You will be pleased to learn that his lordship thoroughly enjoyed thejexcursion which he was induced to make to Mount Cook. You will find him much benefited and invigorated by the short visit to that charming and health-giving locality. He regretted much that he won id not be able to preside at the annual distribution of prises, but under the circumstances it was not possible. The Bishop examined St Joseph's School a short time ago, and more than once has referred to the satisfactory progress made by the pupils— to their diligence and general good conduct throughout the year. No one takes a more lively interest than Bishop Moran in the welfare of Catholic children. When he is pleased we ought I think, to be satisfied that everything is going on well. Children, allow me to thank you on behalf of all present for the very pleasant evening you have enabled us to spend. Ihese entertainments give indication that careful tuition is imparted in the Bchool. This excellence shows that teachers are capable, aod pupils intelligent. There is a certain fitness in ending the scholastic year with a song. You cease to labour in school, and joyously go forth to take well-earned holidays. You are now leaving school for a time, or perhaps altogether. You will, I hope, put in practice those lessons of politeness, of kindness, of virtue which you have received within these hallowed wall?. You will, I trust, while enjoying vacation in a rational way, avoid the forward and boisterous manner which, onfor. tnnately, is so frequently observed in girls in our streets. You will cultivate the quiet, modest, ladylike demeanour which should be characteristic of every convent pupil. Some of you are probably leaving school for good. Well, remember you are only going from one school into another— into the great school of the world— where all learn, even if bitter experience be the only teacher. Try to cultivate the habit of acquiring some useful knowledge every day by reading, and of learning oa ah occasions by observation. You may learn much of what is good from everyone you meet. Though many are perverse, and in their perverse ways to be guarded against, al, have one or more good qualities which you can admire and imitate. We would do well to form the habit of passing over, while we sedulously avoid, what is blameworthy, and of watching closely and admiring and cultivating tbe qualities which are really good. Thus Charity will not so often suffer, and we shall have no lack of good teachers. There is just one point that I would like to insist upon : though yon have a class of domestic economy in this school, you should try at borne, especially during vacation, by study and observation to learn all those things which tend to make a borne comfortable and happy. Believe me, the bad cooking and slovenliness of some women have more to do than people think with the intemperance and carelessness of men. I have now to dismiss yon for tbe summer holidays, lam sure I express the wish of everyone present when I say that I hope you will thoroughly enjoy them (applause). The children were then dismissed.

In one of tbe rooms adjoining the ball a show of work was arranged. The work of the various standards was a marvel of skill

and neatness, the fineness of the stitching being in some instances wonderful as contrasted with the ages of the children. In the lit standard Mary Anne Dunne and Louisa Murray distinguished themselves; in the 2nd Mary O'Connor and Mabel Nelson ; in tbe 3rd Nelly Francis and Maggie Oleary ; in- the 4th Minnie Fitspatriok ; and in tbe 6th Mary fiustin and Mary Oolnmb. Besides thtse speoU mens of plain work tbere were samples of knitting and mending, and mixed specimens something after the style of the old-fashioned samplers, but more elaborate, of many kinds of sewing. All was without exception most creditable. The drawing and exercise books, and copies also showed unmiatakeable marks of careful teaching well responded to, and all had been done in the regular course of the daily instruction. The evidence of first-class work was everywhere apparent. The Sister in charge of the school and her auiitanti deserve sincere congratulation.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZT18921223.2.41.1

Bibliographic details

ST. JOSEPH'S SCHOOL., New Zealand Tablet, Volume XXI, Issue 10, 23 December 1892

Word Count
1,016

ST. JOSEPH'S SCHOOL. New Zealand Tablet, Volume XXI, Issue 10, 23 December 1892

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