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T E M UKA.

(From an occasional Correspondent.)

Temuka, August 9, 1890. On Sunday. 27th of July, the holy sacrifice oE the Mass was celebrated in St. Joseph's Church by the Rev. Father Pertuis (Greymoutb). Af ler the service had been completed , the Rev. Father Fauvel ascended the pulpit. On his pale and worn countenance was depicted a smile which betokened good news. His first words were : '• Praise be to God 1 many and many thanks to St. Joseph 1 deep and long gratitude to His Grace Archbishop Redwood 1 we shall soon have an assistant priest." The rev. gentleman went on to 3ay that after a month of severe illness, seeing that it would take long, if ever, for him to recover, be was at a loss to know what to do in order that the functions of the Church should go on as unimpaired as heretofore. He fall well was aware that there were no priests available in the diocese— on the contrary, four parishes were struggling on short-handed — and, therefore, to apply to the administrator of the diocese for a curate would be useless. In his trials he went to the feet of St. Joseph, who had ever assisted him in his necessities, and asked that saint to whom, and for whom, to apply. By inspiration he wrote to His Grace Archbishop Redwood, asking him for one of his best priests. After explaining that His Grace had not sufficient priests for his own diocese, Father Fauvel went on to say : " See the nobleness of heart of Archbishop Redwood. It was not his place to procure a prieet for me. He could have wiitten back saying it was the duty of Dr. Grimes, or his representative to procure a curate for me. But no ! He had a deep attachment for the people of this parish, and the first opportunity ha got he has shown his love for us. Deep and unlimited gratitude to him I" After speaking for some time in highest terms of praise of His Grace the Archbishop, stating that tne parish owed a vaßt debt of gratitude to him, Father Fauvel said he had received a message from His Grace informing him that the priest asked for could leave his post if someone could be got to replace him. There was still a difficulty in the way, one wbich might be hard to overcome. He again went to St. Joseph, asking him to use his influence. Here if lam granted the concession of an interpolation, his reverence had reason to approach tbis great saint with great confidence, for from the time the foundation-stone of the beautiful church of St Joseph was laid, to when the cross was fixed on its graceful spue, the patron saint did not forsake him. After the first layer of stove had been completed ttie work of building was stopped, uwing to seriouß difficulties, but by Father Fauvel's recourse to Saint Joseph every hitch was overcome. Aye 1 and when the workmen feared — and, therefore, declined — to place the cross in its lolty position over the spire which surmounts the tower, Father Fauvel himself, with confidence in his friend St, Joseph, ascended the mighty height, and did what even skilled men declined to do. To resume, Fattier Fauvel said that on the morning of the Feast of St. Aune (July 26th) he addressed himself to that saint who was the mother ot the Blessed Virgin Mary, and consequently our grandmother. He said to her : '• 0, St. Anne ! Thou art our grandmother, and this is thy feas'-day. Un such occasions it is customary for grandmothers to give sweets to their grandchildren. Dear grandmother, the sweet I ask of you to-day is to let me have a telegram from Wellington announcing the definite news of the coming of my assistant-priest 1 " He bad just finished dinner when a knock: came to the door. It was a telegram conveying the desired news. In concluding, Father Fauvel cautioned his panshuners against an evil winch ia not of an unheard-of occurrence in parishes where there are several priests working together — an evufcr which St. Paul reproved most sev-rely the people of Corinth. Tue evil he deprecated was the spirit of parties, divisions, etc. The rev, gentleman compared a parish to a large family. In a numerous family oftentimes were to be found some children, disobedient, stubborn, doing mischief. They had to be reproved, corrected, and punished. But, of course, they did not like it and grumbled a great deal at the scolding. In like manner, very often were to be found in a parish certain people who, losing sight of God and of the life to come, broke publicly the laws of /the Lord and holy Church, indulged in vice, gave scandal to their brethren. It is the duty ot the parish priest to reprove tbem privately or publicly ; but these guilty people naturally did not like to be reproved. They got angry, brooded over the correction, and gave way to ill-feeling, spoke to everybody of their pretended grievances to induce them to side with them. They even go to the other clergyman, and try their best to make their cause good before him. To succeed "they show him the greatest marks of respect and esteem ; they praise him, and even offer presents, etc. But all such doings were simply devilish deeds, inspired by the spirit of discord ia ciametrical opposition to the spirit of Jesus Christ, which was a spirit of union and chanty. They dried up the source of all heavenly blessings on their abbettors, and lett them like trees whose roots or Bap had been injured enable to bear any fruit for eternal life. He (Father Fauvel) hoped that such things would never be heard of in tne parish of St. Joseph, concluding with the expression of tbe hope that he and his auxiliary would work harmoniously together for the glory of God and their (the parishioners') welfare until it was the will of God to summon him from the world. Father Aubry arrived in Temuka ou Friday by the express,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZT18900815.2.5

Bibliographic details

TEMUKA., New Zealand Tablet, Volume XVIII, Issue 16, 15 August 1890

Word Count
1,018

TEMUKA. New Zealand Tablet, Volume XVIII, Issue 16, 15 August 1890

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