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IRELAND'S RESOLVE.

A gband National League demonstration was held at Knockaderry, in county Limerick, on Bunday, September 21. Father Eugene Sheehy, administrator of Rockhill and Bruree, was the chief speaker. On arriving at the place of meeting he received a regular ovation. The chair was taken by the Rev. Cornelius McCarthy, P.P., of Knockaderry. The following passages from Father Sneehy's speech are taken from the report appearing in the Cork Herald :—: — Rev. Father Sheehy, who was received with deafening cheer.*, again and again renewed, supported tbe resolutions. He said — I find my name associated with a resolution pledging this meeting, and planting the declaration here, that Ireland will not rest satisfied with any mere instalment of social redress, witb any mere measure of political right, short of national independence (cheers). That is the vow of agts ; and it has come sounding through the dark and gloomy history of Ireland ; it has come associated with the struggles and sacrifices of buried generations of Irishmen (cheers). But above their graves, and the echo and the vow of centuries repeated, we reecho here to-day, and we tell all whom it may concern, friend and foe, that there will not be ultimate peace and contentment within our shores until we have the green flag of our country floating in the light of victory above our native Parliament in College-green (cheers). Perhaps at no time in the chequered history of our country was it more apparent to tbe Irish mind— ay, and the feeling and the thought finds favour even in the English mmd — that their Home Rule is not merely an Irish term, but that it has become a social necessity (hear). What are the forces at our command to make our resolves a reality ? We have the enlightened force of public opinion. We have the moral sense and the conscience and intelligence of Ireland at our side — (cheers)— not merely the moral sense of Ireland within our shores, but tbe moral sense of that immense greater Ireland that stretches in its übiquity into every point of this earth's hemisphere, Australia and America (cheers). In every hamlet as well a* in every gre tt city in those far off countries our Irish people are standing on their feet against the permanence of Castle government in aur country (cheers). Ay, and at Home in Great Britain, in Liverpool, and Glasgow, ia Scotland, you have the Irish masses in their millions banded for the object for which we are struggling. Our weapon is a free platform and a fearless utterance of thought (cheers). J here is no necessity — it would be unwisdom, it would be unfortuuate— to employ any other weapon in this our country. " It is not strength and it is not steel Alone that make the Saxon reel, But wisdom working day by day." (Cheers.) We have advantages now unknown to our fathers— • unknown even and not enjoyed at least in thi3 country twenty years ago. We have a national Press which in ability and couragq is unexampled even in a country . with men never wanting to make sacrifices for right and liberty (cheers). They had a splendid weekly Press in United Ireland, the Nation and Weekly Neivs, and they had a weapon equally powerful in the Freeman's Journal (cheers for Gray). All honour to that paper (cheers). With these weapons, then, the people would fight, and could the Castle Govern* ment wield any weapons to combat them ? They might as well try

and shut out God's sunlight. He would ask them to cherish in their heart's core affection and gratitude towards the Irish Parliamentary party, towards every member of that patriotic band (hear, hear). No such body of men ever went into the British House of Commons to represent Ireland. No such splendid patriotism, no such magnificent courage, no such splendid gifts, no such truly Irish eloquence ever flourished defiauce in the teeth of an English statesman as are per* sonified in the section — personified in William O'Brien ; personified, intensified, and glorified in Tim Kealy : personified above all, with, a combination of more eminent qualities than he had enumerated, in the leader and captain of the national cause, Charles Stewart Parnell (cheers). Mr Parnell was the unquestioned leader of political thought and political capital in Ireland. There must be no paltaring with this matter. Mr Parnell was the leader of the Irish people, and they would have no other (cheers;. They stood with Mr Parnell on the League platform, and they subscribed to tbe principles and the programme of the National League, and they would have the settlement of the land question as indicated in the programme of the National League, and they would not for the present listen to any other methods of land reform (hear). No matter in what dulcet tones other principles were recommended to them, though the siren charmed ever so sweetly, they would turn a deaf ear to it. The Irish people were practical politicians, and in a word they were not prepared just now to accept theories that might be very plausible and very nattering to the speculative mind, but they were like things given to children to play with (hear). They would not cease uatil like a brave, patient, and victorious pj'ule, they had won every fullest measure of national right and social redemption ; until Castle Government was no more, and Charles Stewart Parnell Governor of Ireland, Tim Healy Prime Minister, William O'Brien Secretary of State, and Thomas Sexton winning for himself on the floor o£ the Irish House new laurels to wreath a.brow that is already glorionsly decorated with all the more splendid wreaths of Irish eloquence (cheers) ; until, in a word, victory floats over and travels the country in the light of freedom and triumph, and Ireland stands emancipated from the centre to her shores, a nation among the nations (loud, cheers).

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZT18841121.2.37

Bibliographic details

IRELAND'S RESOLVE., New Zealand Tablet, Volume XII, Issue 31, 21 November 1884

Word Count
978

IRELAND'S RESOLVE. New Zealand Tablet, Volume XII, Issue 31, 21 November 1884

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