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General News.

The Freeman* Journal publishes an eight-column anonymous letter, sent from and bearing the London postmark, professing to be the confession of one of the assassins. It is intimated that the crime was conceived as an answer to the appointment of Lord Frederiok Cavendish, by an Irish assassination society, having branches throughout the kingdom. Over twenty persona are said to be implicated in the crime, all of whom have now escaped to England in various disguises. The writer says they attended the funeral of their victims. The story has created a sensation, but is considered a hoax. It contains many gross absurdities. The United Ireland says : — In our eighty-second year of legislative union we are at our forty-first Coercion Act. The very first Ministerial measure introduced into the very first " united " Parliament in which the union of England and Ireland was represented was an Irish Coercion Bill ; the very latest Ministerial measure of the most enlightened, sub! i raited, humanitarian, united Parliament that ever sat in London is an Irish Coercion Bill. For every second year of the whole eighty-two the same " united " Parliament has had to pass an Irish Coercion Act, and the last on the list is the most bloody-minded of all.

Canon Farrer, in his eulogy of Darwin, said that the attacks upon religion in his name were contrary to his convictions.

M. Renan is short, obese, and elderly. He has a full-moon face, but the nwe, instead of being turned up, is heavy and dipping. The forehead is not high or particularly wide. All the lines bounding it are semicircular. Ary Kenan, the son of Ernest, and the grandnephew of Ary Scheffer, makes his debut in the Salon this year. He draws well, colours well, tut does not, according to the London Truth, sufficiently observe the world in which he lives.

Lieutenant Danenhower, one of the survivors of the ill-fated Jeannette, which was lost in the Arctic regions, in his description of his wanderings after the sinking of the vessel, speaks of his landing with his companions on the coast of Siberia. After proceeding inland gome distance, they met some of the native Indians, and to his surprise found them to be Christians and Catholics. He says of them : " After eating they crossed themselves, shook hands and said 'Pashee bah I' They also showed us their crosses, which they kissed, and I was very plad to hay« in my possession a certain talisman (a miraculous medal) which had been sent to me by a Catholic friend at San Francisco, with the message that it had been blessed by the priest and I would be sure to be safe if I wore it. I did not have much faith in this, however, but I showed it to the natives, and they kissed it devoutly. It was the only article in the possession of the party, indeed, that indicated to the natives that we were Christians. You can imagine our feelings at meeting theie people, for they were the first strangers whom we had seen for more than two years, and I never before felt bo thankful to missionaries as I did on that day at finding that we were among Christian natives." This region is, during the greater part of the year, ice-bound; yet even this frigid barrier has not prevented the teachers of the Gospel from spreading the light of truth. — Baltimore Sun.

A long interview with the Cardinal Secretary of State gives the facts respecting Lord Denbigh's visits to the Vatican, and Mr. Errington's mission, as understood by the Pontifical Government, more correctly than they have b»L-n represented generally by the pressHis Eminence said all the assertions and ideas that Lord Denbigh was here to assist or supplement Mr. Errington's mission were entirely beside the mark. The noble Karl was already well.known at the Vatican, and was a man for whom the Pope entertained much regard. Together with Lady Denbigh, he had been received at an ordinary audience. "Of what passed," said the Cardinal, between the noble lord and the Holy Father at their interview I know nothing ; but assuredly it waa nothing of a diplomatic nature." When I ventured to press his Eminence a little as to the qualification of one who acts, although he is not an agent, and is sent though he has no mission, the Cardinal said, laughingly, he might perhaps be the precursor, foreshadowing a mission. In any case, the Holy See strongly desired and had good hope of the re-establishment of a mission, and had from the first manifested its wish in no uncertain terms. The Cardinal expressed strongly his views of the utility of such a mission in the general interests of order, civilisation and good government. He questioned me much respecting the motives of Sir H. Wolff's interrogations in the House of Commons. How, he asked, could a Conservative object to a step so evidently Conservative in character ? On my suggesting the probability that the object of Conservative attack was the apparent want of candour and sincerity in our Premier's method of conducting the nepociation, the Cardinal adverted to the entire openness and straightforwardness of their statements of their wishes and hopes in the matter.

About twenty years ago the people of Poland rose against Russia, and made a fruitless attempt at throwing off the yoke under which they had groaned nearly a century. Among the innocent victims of the rebellion were several hundred Catholic priests, who were sentenced without trial to perpetual exile in Siberia, part of the time to bs spent in penal servitude in the mines of that country. The number of the exiles has by this time dwindled down to a few dozens. The penal servitude is over, but tte banishment subsists; and the latest reports received from Siberia, and reproduced by the JBicn Pullic of Brussels, and the Gertnania of Berlin, show that the unfortunate exiles are simply starving with cold and want of food. One of them writes :—": — " After walking 9,000 miles our condition is worse than it was in the mines, where we had at least shelter and a piece of bread. The cold — forty degrees below zero — and hunger are sure to kill us, unless God, in His mercy, sends us a lifeboat to save us." There certainly is not another government in the world beside the Russian, that would starve people in that way, after they have escaped with bare life from the hardest punishment that could be

devised for unproved crimes. The Turks are more merciful : they give their prisoners the happy dispatch straight off and have done with them. — Universe.

The Bishop of death's action with reference to the murder of Mrs. Smythe is thus described by a " Westmeath Catholic " in a letter to the Times :— "The Bishop was in a distant part of his Diocese when the dreadful crime referred to was committed, but on the first opportunity after his return to Mullingar — viz.. at the first Mass on Easter Sunday morning, when His Lordship officiated in his Cat hedral for an unusually large congregation — he denounced in most powerful and scathing language the frightfully shocking crime which had, a few days before, been committed at Barbavilla." On his Lordship's attitude towards political outrages in general, the writer adds : — " I have had the honor of Dr. Nulty's acquaintance for several years ; and, although I feel constrained to differ most respectfully to some of His Lordship's political opinions, I believe most firmly that there is not a man, lay or clerical, in the United Kingdom who more thoroughly abhors and regrets the commission of crime. As a neighbor of Dr. Nulty's I know that he has always been most constant and untiring in his public denunciation of crime and of secret societies, and from matters which have come to mv knowledge I have strong reason to believe that, were it not for His Lordship's most zealous and praiseworthy labors as a priest, the number of Westmeath victims to the ' wild justice of revenge ' would be even greater than it unfortunately is." — Liverpool Catholic Times.

One of the most Radical of the Radical papers of Prance is La France, a journal which does not allow a day to pass without casting its venom on the Catholic Church, and upon all institutions that bear the name of Catholic. The founder, and until lately the conductor, of this paper is, or rather was, M. Charles Jenty, one of the most prominent French Radicals and haters of the Church in which he was born. Yet, strange to say, this hatred could not stand against death, and, when the fatal moment arrived, it was found nowhere. Thus it happens that in La France of last Saturday, just below an article entitled " The Tenth Crusade," which is a violent onslaught on the Catholic Cburch, we find the following announcement in prominent type : " You are requested to be present at the funeral service and burial of M. Charles Jenty, former member Parliament, officer of the Legion of Honor, who died, comforted by the Sacraments of the Church, on April 26, 1882, at the age of 56, at his residence, 68, Avenue des Champs Elysees.' 1 Now, here is another inconsistency. A man who has spent thirty years in writing the Church down, sends for a priest at the last moment, and his own paper is compelled to bear witness to the fact of his recantation. — London Universe.

Mr. O'Donnell has given notice that on the second reading of the new Coercion Bill he will niove : That outrage and disaffection in Ireland are due above all to the unjust and merciless eviction of upwards of 40,000 men, women, and children by the police and military forces of the Crown during the tenure of office of the right hon. member for Bradford. That the feeling of exasperation caused by this eviction of a whole population has been intensified by the conduct of numerous magistrates, police officers, and other officials in causing the slaying and wounding of men, women, and children, without any subsequent punishment or trial for such slaying and wounding. That the assassination of two members of the Irish Government, which could not have occurred except through the criminal negligence of the Irish police as organized by the right hon. member for Bradford, and which has been universally condemned and deplored in Ireland, is no excuse or palliation for confiscating the safety and liberty of the Irish people. And that, under these circumstances, the proposed Prevention of Crime (Ireland) Bill can only act as a provocation to discontent, and as a fatal obstacle to good government, order, and tranquility.

Mr. MacFarland, M.P. for Carlow, writes to the Herald explaining his reasons for withdrawing his motion in the House relative to the condition of the Skye crofters. He says he did so at the request of Mr. Fraser Mackintosh, the member for Inverness, who had also a motion on the books in reference to the same matter. The latter hon. gentleman has been talking and promising and " giving noticea " for months, but has really done nothing whatever. I have reason to know that the friends of the crofters have given up all hope of any help from the Scotch members, and would be most happy to see the matter taken up by Mr. MacFarlane or some of the active Irish party. If the Scotch members, they say, meant business and honestly desired to expose landlord doings in the North, they could have easily had a field night on the subjects long since. The hope of the crofters is in Mr. Parnell and his colleagues to whom they look with confidence for an early statement of their case in the House of Commons. That the crofters stand in sore need of help from some honest and earnest party in the House is obvious. Their own representatives will do nothing for them. Their Press is against them. The Inverness Courier writes that " if the people are not incited by the outsiders, they will resume their former condition of orderly behavour ;" that is to say, they should submit to be rack-rented and exterminated without a murmur. If " outsidera " do not come to the rescue it will go hard with the unfortunate crofterp. — Dublin Freeman

Longfellow, Eossetti, MacCarthy, Darwin, Emerson — all dead ? No ; living, in that endless life wherein they are receiving either reward or punishment for their deeds in this. What, after all, is earth with its fame and its glory and its riches, in the face of eternity 1 Catholic Mirror.

We are in receipt of encouraging news from the vicariate of North Carolina. Bishop Northrop and Father Gross lately visited the mission of Newton Grove, and immense crowds attended the services there held, which continued for three days. The c oquent sermon 8 delivered by the Rt. Bey. Bishop were well received, and the indications are that the influences of the faith are spreading far and wide. Twenty-one persons, all converts, were confirmed. A visit was also made to Good Shepherd's Church, in Dulpin county, where three persons were confirmed. — Catholic Visitor.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZT18820728.2.8

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Tablet, New Zealand Tablet, Volume X, Issue 485, 28 July 1882

Word Count
2,187

General News. New Zealand Tablet, Volume X, Issue 485, 28 July 1882

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