Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

In the Public Eye.

Mr. G-kohoe J. Smith, the newly-elected

member for Christchurch J " City>iS nOt a " eW figUre in Parliament, for he i*epresented Christclmrch from 1 893 to 1899, when he was defeated. Mr. Smith was

born at Xewcastle-on-Tyne, England, and is forty years of age After receiving an education at the Wesleyan School at his native place, he entered the service of Messrs. Ham el and Maples, Government solicitors, in the capacity of a clerk, and remained there for five years. He came to the colony in 1880, and accepted an appointment in the firm of Grarrick, Cowlishaw, and Fisher, of Christchurch. After eleven years' service with them, he joined Messrs. Bowron Bros., leather merchants, Christ-

church, and afterwards became a partner in the firm. Mr. Smith is an earnest worker in the cause of temperance. Ho is also an enthusiastic volunteer, h\s experience commencing in an engineer company in England. He was for three years a lieutenant in the City Rifles, Christchurch, and then became captain of the Sydenham Eifles Mr. F. H. Hasklden, the new member for Patea, arrived at Auckland EASELS hl 186U - After WOTkin ? for three years on his father's farm he went to the Hokitika goldfields, and thence to Opotiki, Bay of Plenty. Joining the colonial forces he went through the Maori war on the East Coast, and during an engagement shot one of the

murderers of the Eev. Mr. Volkner. He was mentioned in dispatches for gallantry. Mr. Haselden then tried in turn the Gympie Creek (Queensland), West Coast, and Thames goldfields. Losing all he had at the Thames, he accepted the position in 1873 of manager of the Muriwhenua Station at the North Cape, the property of Messrs. Tates and Jones. After three years in this position he was appointed manager of Messrs. Russell and Morrin's Ruanui Station, near Euapehu, which he converted from a wilderness of fern into a well-grassed sheep run. Eight years later he purchased 2,500 acres of land on the Mangawhau River, twenty miles from Wanganui. He cleared and grassed it, and occupied it for seven years. He then took up land at Shannon for three years, and afterwards sold out, and took up another property at Hunterville, where he at present resides. He has a dairy herd of 100 cows, and runs over 4,000 sheep. Mr. Haseldeu has always taken a great interest in local affairs, and has held office as Chairman of Road Boards and as a member of the Wanganui and Eangitikei County Councils. He has also been Chairman of the Rewa Dairy Factory since its inception. The new member, who has been a Justice of the Peace for eighteen years, is a brother of Mr. W. E. Haselden, S.M. at Wellington.

Me. Evert Maclean, whose death occurred recently at his residence MR. EVERY _, rT . MACLEAN. Bleak House,Howick,near Auck land ,was a fine sample of the pioneers who have helped materially to make this country what it is. Mr Maclean came to this colony some fifty years ago. On landing Mx. Maclean and his brother Robert had one great advantage over many who came to New Zealand to follow farming pursuits. They had a thorough knowledge of stockbreeding and agricultural work generally. It had been bred in them in their native country of Devon, where their progenitors had been noted stock-breedei's for many years.

The two brothers secured land in the East Tamaki District, and imported the first pedigree stock from the Old Country. Their fine Shorthorns and Herefords as well as Leicester, Southdown, and Shropshire sheep took many prises at the Agricultural shows in the Auckland province, and did much to make the stock in the district what they are. Mr. Maclean naturally always took an interest

in Agricultural Shows, aud was himself a most energetic worker in the cause. He did good work in the foundation and management of the Auckland Agricultural Society. And with his brother he assisted materially in the establishment of the New Zealand Stud and Pedigree Stock Company, aud in the development of the Waikato as a farming district. But it was not only as a stock-breed-er that Mr. Maclean served his country, he was at one time in the Provincial Council and during the unsettled period of the Maori War his energetic temperament and admirable horsemanship fitted him for the position he held as an efficient captain of a troop of volunteer cavalry.

Mr. John Hugh Buchanan Coates. the General Manager of the M LL?» B " National Bank of New COATES' _ Zealand, is a brilliant example of the position to which a man may attain, provided he has the requisite euorgy, talent arid address. Mr. Coates was born

at Auckland in 1851, his father being private secretary to the then Governor. He was educated at the Church of England Grammar School and at St. John's College, Auckland, and in 1869 entered the service of the Bank of New South W.iles. He served for four years in that institution at Auckland and on the Thames Goldfields, and then accepted, the position of toller in the National Bank at Auckland. In 1876 he became accountant, and eight years later manager On the retirement of Mr. W. Dymock as General Manager of the Bank, the Hoard of Directors elected Mr. Coates to succeed him. Before taking up his newduties, Mr. Ooates visited Kngland to confer with the directors of the Bank as to the

conduct of tho business iv the colony. Ho returned in 1898. The following year he was offered but declined the position of President of the Bank of New Zealand. In 1889 he was elected a Fellow of tho Hankers' Institute of London. Mr. Coatcs has always taken a keen interest in athletics, and was one of the founders of tho Auckland Athletic Association, of which he was President before leaving to take up his residence in Wellington. ♦ Mr. John Rohkhts, the well-known billiard champion, is now MR. JOHN in N(JW Zeala]H | He i 8 ROBERTS- , , . at tho time or writing engaged in a series of matches lie intends playing in New Zealand, startingin Auckland and finishing nt Invercargill He will next visit Australia, and then play his way homo again, taking a tour through the Hast, visiting Indian and Chinese ports, and finishing up in America, a memorable trip

lasting- over twenty-seven months."] Mr.' Roberts is now fifty-four years of age, and those who saw him play on his visit to New Zealand some twenty-five years since affirm that he has lost little, if any, of his brilliancy of play and perfect command of the game. Jt may be of interest to give the following particulars of his career. In 1871 he won the Billiard Championship by beating J. Bennett. In 1 875 and the two successive years he repeated the performance, Cook being his adversary on each occasion, although Cook had three times previously put him down. In 1885 he was again victorious over Cook, and the same year he also again met and defeated J. Bennett. In this match Roberts secured the largest break, 155. viz., in a game of 3,000 up. During his play in Auckland recently Roberts gave interesting exhibitions of what can be done with the cue, and how infinitely superior he was to any player who could be brought against him.

Sergeant Richard Shepherd, of County Armagh, Ireland, volunsbSbT^z.c. *"«? from th \ Avm R tu Militia into the 68th Durham Light Infantry in 1855. He served in Malta, Crimea, Corfu, Cephalohia, and Burmah, and coming to New Zealand in 1864 was at the Gate Pa engagement. Two years later he joined the Ist Waikato Regiment, and took part in the engagement of Irihanga, Whakamarama, and Ake Ake. He left the Regiment in 1868 to join the Armed Constabulary under Major Eraser. When Te Kooti made his escape from the Chatham Islands and massacred the settlers at Poverty Bay, Sergeant Shepherd's Division was ordered there, and when the arch rebel and his followers made their escape into the Urewera Country, be was one of the party who followed them for some fourteen days, Te Kooti having a start of six days. The marching was kept up day and night over terribly rough bush country, wtoere they had to cut their way with tuiftahawks, and ford dangerous rivers.

When tlie attack" was made on Te Kooti at Ruakitura they had been without food for twenty-fonr hours, and for four days, in incessant rain, without tents, they lived on horseflesh and less than a cup of flour each per day Sergeant Shepherd had charge of a party of ten men on a ridgy at the rear of the Ngatapa Pa when Black and Biddle were recommended for the N.Z.C. He had some narrow escapes there ; the shoulder strap was shot off his coat, the skin torn

from his hand, and the stock of his carbiue broken by the enemy's bullets. Several of the party were killed and wounded, and as one of the latter was on the point of falling over the cliff the sergeant seized and saved him. On looking up he saw a Maori with a rifle at his shoulder, and the muzzle three feet from his breast. A. sergeant of the Poverty Bay scouts arrived in the nick of time, and shot the Maori with his revolver. After the capture of Ngatapa the Company was ordered to Wanganni, where Titokowaru

had driven the settlers from their homesteads, and was threatening the town. Sergeant

Shepherd was at the engagements of Taurangahika, Moturoa, and Otauto. He received the New Zealand Cross for bravery at the latter place. He had charge of a picket of six men, and was ordored by Colonel Whitmore to hold a path leading, to the Maori encampment, when three of the men were shot dead through their heads, and three others were wounded, including the sergeant, the bullet, entering the left side of his jaw, passing under the tongue, and out close to the jugular vein. In addition to the Cross, Sergoant Shepherd received the New Zealand War Medal from the Home Government, and also the medal from the New Zealand Government. ♦ — Mr. Harraway, the well-known Chairman of the Otago Education MR. HARRAWAY. Board> jg a geut i oman who has done much to further the cause of education in Otago. It is men of his stamp, who devote their whole energies to making the system as perfect as possible, that have made New Zealand's educational facilities an example to other colonies.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/NZI19010901.2.3

Bibliographic details

In the Public Eye., New Zealand Illustrated Magazine, 1 September 1901, Unnumbered

Word Count
1,753

In the Public Eye. New Zealand Illustrated Magazine, 1 September 1901, Unnumbered

Working