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In the Public Bye.

Rear-Admiral Gkorge Collier Remey is a

native of the State of ADM ?B A NAVY MEY> lOW8 ' and entered the United States Naval Academy as an acting midshipman about the age of fourteen. In June, 1859, he was made a midshipman, and served on the Asiatic Station, being present off Taku, China, during the allied operations of the French and English, which resulted in the capture of Tientsin and Pekin.

Commissioned a lieu-

tenant in August, 1861, he was Executive Officer of the gunboat " Marblehead " in the blockade of Charleston Harbour. While in command of a battery constructed on shore, he was captured by the Confederates during an attack on Fort Sumter, and re-

mamed a prisoner in their hands for thirteen months. He was later attached to the "Do Soto," "Oanandaigua," and " Mohongo," and was one of three officers selected to guard the remains of the assassinated President Lincoln while they lay in state in the Executive Mansion. After the Civil War he was promoted to Lieutenant - Commander, and at>out this time was sent on a special mission by the State Department on matters connected with the relations between the United States and Mexico on the frontier. In the following years he servec on the staff of Rear-Admiral Green, on the North Atlantic Station, as Executive Officer of the frigate " Sabine," and as instructor in ordnance

nnd gunnery at the Naval Acadomy. U<» was promoted to Commander in 1872. and in this grade served in command of the sloop-nf-war " Enterprise," and ns Chief nf Staff, to Rear- Admiral Nicholson, on the European Station, witnessing the bombardment of Alexandria in 1884. He was commissioned captain in 1885. In these two grades he had tonrs of shore duty at tin* Navy Department and at the Navy Yards at Washington, Norfolk, Va M and Portsmouth, N.H. He was the- first captain of tho cruiser '" Charleston," being in command at the time she chased the filibuster steamer "Itata " which

ADMIRAL REMEY

was carrying arms from the United Statos to aid the Chilian insurgents. At the ou<- break of th<» war with Spain, tho then Commodore Reu\oy was Commandant of "the Navy Yard -fit iWtsmouth, N.H. ; Butt lu v was soon ordei'ed^to assume command of the Naval Base at Key West, tin; principal advanced point of supply and information for the* North Atlantic fleet,

and from which place the blockade of Cuba whs maintained and largely directed. After the war he assumed hispresentconimand as Comniander-in-Chief of the United States Naval Force on Asiatic Station, including all Japan, China, India, and the Philippines, with headquarters at Manila. The vessels of the fleet are about fifty in number, of all sizen, with two Junior Keai -Admirals and sonw> eight thousand officers and men. It ia

worthy of note that during the recent operations of the Allied Forces in China, in the summer of 1900, Rear- Admiral Re - mey was present as Coinmander-iii-Chief of the : u;s: Naval Force, amid scenes similar £o his earliest naval experience on the same spot.

ALFRED RICHARD BARCLAY, BA.. LL.B. IN.ZO MH.R.

Alfred Richard

< ; ' : ' . . Bapclay, Barrister and Solicitor of 'the Supreme Court of New Zealand, was the son of the Rev. G. Barclay, of South Canterbury, well known as a pioneer clergyman and prominent figure in educatonal circles. He was educated ! at Tinifiru Public School, Christ's Ohristchurch College, and the University of Otago, and was dux 6f Timaru School, and head of Upper Fifth in Christ's College, when "he left. He took an active part in the Debating Society of the University of Otago, and was oneof thefirst two students who were appointed vice-presidents of that body. He graduated B.A. in 1878, being the third in New Zealand to attain that honour. He subsequently entered the law office of Messrs. Gr, and J. A. Cook, Dunedinj and graduated LL.B., and in due course was admitted as a barrister and solicitor;. He was appointed lecturer in Constitutional. History and Law in Otago University in 1891. Be took no prominent or active part in politics or public life, except occasionally speaking at > meetings or assisting in public movements, but .delivered a considerable number of speeches , ancl addresses at various times on social, economic, and literary subjects. He was elected as representative of the city of Dunedin in December, 1899. This election was one of the surprises of the colony ,owing to the unexpected defeat of i the able and talented sitting member, Mr. Scobie MacKenzie. Mr. Barclay claims that his success on the first occasion of his standing for . Parliament for, a large city like Dunedin is: 'somewhat remarkable inasmuch as that, though selected as one of the O-overnment and Liberal candidates, he was at ii»at time, not even personally .known to the Prer mier, had never had any communication with

him, had but a very small personal acquaintance amongst the ranks of labour, and belonged to no large organization of any kind. Nor did he in any way offer his services, but was invited by the party to accept nomination — a high honour to one who had no political services of any kind to point to. In politics Mr. Barclay belongs to the Radical party, and supports, to a very considerable extent, State Nationalization. In the l'ca 1 !!) of sport Mr. Barclay was a cricketer and footballer for many years, and until lately represented the University Cricktt Club in the Otago Cricket Association, and was vice-president of the Umpires' Association. Of late years he has taken to chess, and last year was president of the Otago Chess Club. He also came out first in the second Chess Tournament held in the " House " in Wellington last session. He is vice-president of the Dunedin Fabian Society, and various other local bodies, and was member of the Athenaeum Committee for several years. He has published various pamphlets and addresses, such as "The Origin of Wealth," " Federation," "Four Years of Industrial Conciliation anil Arbitration," etc, etc. Mr. Barclay has also been clerk of the Convocation of the University of New Zealand since its establishment. He combines a certain amount of journalistic and press work with the profession of the law.

Mr. .Robert Allan, one of the Christoluireh Royal Reception ■Conirnismissioners, was born in Nelson in 1848, but claims Canterbury as his home, having resided there since its foundation . He was educated at the Public School in Lytteltonjand was one of the first pupils to enter the Scotch School when it was opened by the Rev. J. D. Ferguson. He left school at an early age, and worked for the old firm of J. Gc. Peacock find Co., general merchants, where he received a varied commercial training, going ou one occasion as super-cargo to Chili, to buy wheat for New Zealand. After leaving the

old (inn, Mr. Allan entered into business, and during tho past twenty years Ims been concerned in many enterprises in Canterbury* Ho was one of the promoters and lirst directors of the Canterbury Tramway Company, and was, for souk* years, one oi the early directors of the Ivainpoi Woollen Company. At present, lie is a director ol the well-known linn of Skelton, Krostiek and Co., Ltd. lie is also the owner of a sheep farm in North Canterbury. In public matters, Mr. Allan has always taken a fair share, having served as a member on the Heathcote Lload lioard, and for nine* years as a member of tho Lyttelton Harbour Board during the time the dock and other large works were carried out. He was also

the first President of the; Industrial Association of Canterbury, and presided over the first Industrial Exhibition held in Canterbury over twenty years ago. During the Canterbury Jubilee Year he was again placed in the position of President, and presided over the Exhibition, which had a most successful career, leaving a profit of £3,000. Mr. Allan also took a leading part in the erection of the fine- block of buildings known as the Agricultural and Industrial Hall, and represents the Industrial Association on the Directory. These fine premises formed a

portion of the Exhibition Buildings, and it is here that the Mayor's reception of Their Royal Highnesses was held. ♦ Mr. Henry F. Wigram, another of the Christchurch Executive MR. HENBY F. Commissioners, is a WIGBAM. ' . member or Wigram Bros., the well-known firm of produce merchants. He is a prominent .public, man, being on the directorate of several companies, and Chairman of the Lyttelton limes Company. That he enjoys the confidence of his fellow- citizens is especially shown by the fact that he -was elected last year Chairman of the Canterbury Jubilee Memorial Committee, which is entrusted

with work that evei*y Canterbury man is deeply interested in. . . .

A sketch of Mr. Robert Cliisholm's earlier

career appeared in the Magazine at the time when he filled the Mayoral Chair for the City of

Dunedin. He has lately been appointed one of the Royal Reception Commissioners fur Dunedin, and it might be well to glance at the work effected during his mayoralty. This was exceptionally heavy, embracing as it, did the institution of the Patriotic and Indian Relief Funds, the despatch of South Africau Contingents, the reception of Imperial and Indian troops, duties in conneche

tion with the death of the Queen find

proclamation df the King, (he demonstrations at the time of the Relief of Ladysmith and Mafeking, and the commencement of the preparations for the Royal Reception, all of which were additions to the ordinary duties usually required of the Mayor of an important borough, which, owing to Mr. Chisholm's extraordinaty capacity for work and high sense of civic duty, have resulted in many arduous undertakings, and marked improvements being effected in the city. Pressure was brought to bear on Mr. Chisholm to induce him to offer himself for another term, but he declined, as he had pledged himself not to oppose Councillor Den nis- ton, the present Mayor.

Mr. F, R. Chapman, another of Dunediu's Royal Reception ComMR. F.B. CHAPMAN. missiouerß> U the youngest of four surviving sons of the late Mr. Justice Chapman, and is a native of New Zealand. Mr. Chapman was called to the English bar in 1871, after having been a pupil of Mr. Charles Russell (afterwards Lord Russell), of Killowen, Lord Chief Justice of England, and has practised inDnnedin since

1872. He has for many years taken leading briefs in the principal litigations in his province, and is a constant figure in the Court of Appeal. He was senior counsel for the defence in the notorious . Hall case in .1887, and one of his most recent cases was that of Aitcheson v. The Kaitangata Coal Company, in which his client recovered a heavy verdict for coal royalties .after a complicated trial, lasting twenty-three days. Mr. Martin Chapman (a brother) also occupies a similar position at the Wellington bar. Mr. Chapman is an occasional contributor to the scientific columns of the press, and is the author of several papers printed in the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute.

He has several times been President of the Otago Institute. Ho married in 1879 the only daughter of the late Mr. Georgo Cook, one of the leaders of the Otago bar, their family consisting of two sons and three daughters. Mr. Seymour Thokne Gkokce, the youngest son of Liontonant-Colonel th"oehSZ. ™/»™ «-8- ° ! «» 4th Hussars, was born in St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, in February, 1851, and was educated at Cheltenham College for Woolwich. He arrived in New Zealand in 1869, and took up a block of land at Taupo. Some time later Sir George Grey secured his services as manager of

Kawau . Island, and the improvements effected duriu«j the twelve years he held the position proved the wisdom of his selection. Mr. Thome George has always taken great interest in politics. He whs elected a Member of the House of Representatives for Hokitika in 1878. A year later the electors of Rodney did him the same honour. The

manner in which ho performed his Parliamentary duties ensured his re-election in 1882. In 1884 he settled in Auckland. Mr. Thorne George has proved himself a good citizen by taking his fall share of civic duties also. He was twice elected Mayor of Parnell, and lias filled a seat on the Harbour Board and Hospital and Charitable Aid Board. He also in 18^5 was elected Captain of the "0" Battery of the Volunteer Garrison Artillery, and has ever been found ready and willing to assist in any movement that had for its objects the advancement of the colony. Canterbury is as remarkable for the excellence of its press as MR. G. G. STEAD. fm< itg ftgricu , tara , pro . ducts, and it is perhaps fitting that two pf her three Commissioners are both produce merchants* 'and also heads of two of the most important newspaper companies in the colonies. Mr. G. G. Stead has been for some time Chairman of Directois of the Press Company. He is also noted for his intimate connection with the Canterbury

Jockey Club, and as the. premier racehorse owner in New Zealand. Mr. Stead wag among the most prominent of those who

succeeded iv accumulating and despatching Canterbury's magnificent present of troops and horses for South Africa. He was also

Kuyal Eecepiion Commissioiier, Invercargill,

for many years a member of- the Canterbury College Board of Governors, from which lie lately resigned as a protest against the somewhat conservative attitude of the

Board

Mr. John McLeod, who was appointed by the Government as one of M MoIZ N Uk Aackl, D d Boyal Reception Commissioners, has resided in this colony neai'ly all his life. He arrived in Auckland from Scotland with his father nearly forty years since Having to face the world at a very early age, Mr. McLeod, like many another pioneer, had to depend on evening classes for much of his educatiou, or go without it. He preferred the former alternative, and amongst those who assisted him in his earliest endeavours to acquire knowledge, he holds the late Dr.

Kidd, Mr. Henry Wovtliington, ami Mr. Peltzer in grateful remembrance. Mr. McLeod is best known in his connection

with Friendly Societies, to which he has devoted a gi'eat deal of his spare time. For some years he acted as President of the Auckland United Friendly Societies' Conference, and still holds the responsible position of Trustee of that important body. He is also Provincial Corresponding Secretary of the Auckland District Manchester Unity of Oddfellows, Trustee of the Good Intent Lodge, and Treasurer of the McLeod Juvenile Lodge of the same Society. Mr. McLeod takes considerable interest in educational matters in the city, having been a member of the City Schools' Committee for some years, and he is at present its Treasurer.

Colonel Wales, the third of the Danedin

Royal Reception CotnCOLONEL N. Y. A. m { ss j on( , rs vvas born at WALES. „ „ n . ' , Jieliuru, m Northumbei*land,and educated at Jedburgh, in Scotland.

Ho emigrated tv Australia in the iluys when the excitement of tin- new ti'nlil limls was at. its height. In 1801 he came across to Dunedin, where lie soon came to the front as a man who thoroughly understood tho higher duties of citizenship, and fulfilled them honourably. He has been at divers times MemberoftlieHoii.se of We present at ives, and of the Dmu'din City ( 'ouisril and Harbour Board ; of tin; hitler he was oneo Chairman. In l8!)5-ti ho ably filled tho Mayoral Chair. I Lis conception of his duty to his country did not end here. The year 1862 found him a member of the No, 1 Company City Guaids. From the position of ensign he was not. long" in rising totlmt of Commander of the district, an.d lie eventually retired with the rank of lieutenant-Colonel of Militia and H norary Colonel of Volunteers, positions which he still holds. During 1 his visit to London in 18.5, Colonel Wales was appointed Honorary Associate

Grand Priory of the: 0 I'd or of St. John of Jerusalem iv E.igland, ami he *ils»> received the. Honorary Associates' Medal.

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Bibliographic details

In the Public Bye., New Zealand Illustrated Magazine, 1 July 1901

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In the Public Bye. New Zealand Illustrated Magazine, 1 July 1901

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