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Native Schools.

No. i. (Extract miii the went p-ninth Annual I apart liftin’ Minister of Education.) The number of Maori village schools in operation at the end of 1904 was 100. In 1905 three schools were opened, two were transferred to Education Boards, four were closed, and two were given up by the Department. There were thus ninty-five schools in working order at the end of 1905. The number of children on the rolls of these schools at the 31st December, 1905, was 3863 as against 3754 at the end of the preceding year. The number of children is thus increased by 119, while there were five schools fewer in number. The average attendance for the whole year 1905 was 3428, an increase of 344 on that of the preceding year. The regularity of the attendance has increased from 81 to 84 per cent., which is very little behind the average attendance at the public schools of the colony. This is all the more satisfactory when it is considered that none of the Maori schools are town schools. In addition to the village schools, there are six mission schools that are usually inspected and examined by the Department, two schools of this kind having been established during the year. There are also six boarding-schools established by the authorities of variou Churches in New Zealand; these form the only means available of affording higher education specially for Maori boys and girls. The total number of Native schools open at the end of 1905 was thus 107. European children attending Maori schools are provided for in the matter of higher education by the provisions of the regulations concerning free places in

secondary schools, and admission has already been granted to candidates who have gained in Native schools the necessary qualifications. Three new schoolsOruanui and Waitahanui, in Taupo district, and Mangarorongo, in the King Country—were opened during the year, the first two with considerable success. There is still some difficulty in procuring candidates who possess the qualifications desirable in the case of Native school teachers, and, for this reason, the school built at Waimarama, Hawke’s Bay, could not be opened until some time had elapsed after its completion. The schools at Papawai and Te Kuiti were, at the request of the people interested, handed over, the former to the Wellington and the latter to the Auckland Board of Education. The school at Te Houhi had to be abandoned owing to the departure of the Maoris consequent upon the resumption of their lands by the legal owner, while Awangararanui, Raorao, and Pariroa schools were closed owing to the attendance falling below the number required. The Department has found it necessary to increase the accommodation at several schools, and has before it applications of a promising nature for the establishment of several new schools. Information upon these, as far as it has been ascertained, is given in the Inspector’s report. During the year a gratifying advance has been made in the matter of handwork in Native schools. Fire new workshops have been established, all of them with the assistance of the Maoris, and at small expense to the Department. A beginning has also been made in the matter of giving instruction in cooking, the utensils being such as are in general use in Maori kaiangas. Instruction in practical needlework has also, during the year, been considerably developed, especially in the largest schools. For the higher education of Maori youths there are six Native Boarding Schools available— viz., St. Stephen’s and Te Aute for boys, and Hukarere, St. Joseph’s, Victoria, and Turakina Schools for girls. The Government offers 123 scholarships, tenable at one or other of these schools for two years, to children of predominantly Maori race who pass the Fourth or a higher Standard at the Maori village schools ; most of the holders have passed the Fifth, Sixth, or Seventh Standard. At the end of the year thirtyeight of the scholarships were held by boys and fourty-four by girls. To Maori children attending public schools who pass the Fifth Standard before reaching the age of fifteen scholarships of the value of £2O a year are granted, to enable them to attend a secondary school or to become apprenticed to a suitable trade. Under these conditions there are seven scholars attending secondary schools and seven boys serving apprenticeships. Further advance has also been made in regard to what are

known as “ nursing scholarships.” There are now (1906) three probationers— one each at the Napier, Wellington, and Auckland Hospitalswhile arrangements have been made for admission of three scholars as day pupils. Six scholarships are offered by the Government to Maori youths to whom it is considered advisable to give university training. Three of these are reserved for those who wish to study medicine, and the remaining ones are open. At present there are three scholarships being held, one student taking the medical course, one arts, and one law. With reference to the conditions under which all the scholorships are granted, it seems evident that higher qualifications may now be safely demanded from those who wish to obtain secondary or higher education. There is already manifest a been desire on the part of the Maori parents for instruction in manual and technical work of such a cheracter as is likely to be most useful to the young Maori. The ready assistance they have given in various localities during the year in the establishing of workshops is evidence of this desire. The Department is also beginning to find that where boys and girls can obtain practical training of some kind at home, their parents do not wish them to attend a secondary school. It may be seen from these facts that the system of handwork and manual instruction in Native schools is now beginning to bear fruit, and an extension of the scheme is to be looked for as a natural result. For boys, instruction in elementary agriculture is probably the direction in which extension of technical work is desirable, while for girls needlework, cookery and domestic economy may be further developed. The total expenditure on Native schools during the year was £24,077, which includes £95 paid from Native school reserve funds and £2OOO from Civil List for Native purposes. Deducting £36, recoveries from various sources, the result is a net cost of £24,041 for the year 1905, as against £24,881 for the previous year. Included in this sum is expenditure on new buildings and additions, £2560 ; on secondary education (including boardingschool fees for holders of scholarships from village schools, apprenticeships, hospitalnursing scholarships, University scholarships, and travelling expenses of scholarship holders), £2116, The staff of the village schools included seventy-three masters, twenty-one mistresses in charge, eighty-seven assistants, and fifteen sewing teachers. The masters received salaries ranging from £9O 16s 8d to £269 5s rod; the head-mistresses from £6O to £173 13s gd ; the assistants from £g 8s 48 to £SO ; and the sewing teachers from £6 13s 3d to £lB 15s. In one school the master and mistress work conjointly, the total salary being £320 10s at the end of the year. The assistants and sewingteachers in the greater number of the

schools are generally members of the teacher’s family, who give assistance in some part of the day’s work. The assistance thus given is, however, becoming more valuable every year; indeed the Department regards the work done by the assistants in the preparatory classes as of prime importance. A scale of salaries has been approved, approximating to that set forth in the Schedule to “ The Education Act Amendment Act, 1905.” The effect will be to produce a more even distribution to the amount paid as salaries to teachers, and to raise the salaries of assistants generally. As regards the race of the 3863 children attending Native schools during 1905, 80.8 per cent, were Maori or nearly Maori, 8.6 per cent, were half-castes living as Maoris, 2.2 per cent, were half-castes, or nearly so, living as Europeans, and 8.4 per cent, were Europeans. Of the 3786 children of Maori or mixed race attending public schools, 59.6 per cent, were Maori, 5.9 per cent, were of mixed race living as Maoris, and 34.4 per cent, were ol mixed race living as Europeans. The standard classification of pupils of Native schools at the end of the year was : Preparatory classes, 1223, an increase of 18 on the previous year ; Standard I, 728, an increase of 97; Standard 11, 629; Standard HI, 594; Standard IV, 439; Standard V, 159; Standard VI, So; and Standard VII, 28. (The italics are ours).

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/MAOREC19070101.2.9

Bibliographic details

Native Schools., Maori Record : a journal devoted to the advancement of the Maori people , Volume 2, Issue 19, 1 January 1907

Word Count
1,428

Native Schools. Maori Record : a journal devoted to the advancement of the Maori people , Volume 2, Issue 19, 1 January 1907

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