Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
Block image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

You Don't Say So !

Dr. Maclrin contemplates an early trip Home. The Hymeneal altar, eh, Doc. ?

Stout is falling back in popularity. Outside a small gang of temperance devotees his Auckland speech fell as flat as ditch water.

Colonel Fox won't get the best of his little affair with the Premier. Eeport says that Eichard of Kumara holds two bowers and the joker in the Fox game.

Buff and Black, poor Vigilant's successor on the Times and Mail, is making a name for himself. Teddy Cowan is a Napier man who was formerly " on" the Neios and Telegraph.

Mr. Ben Wilson, the genial and unassuming young gentleman who is Private Secretary to Hon. Cadman is engaged to a "Wellington young lady — Miss Dot Parsons. Congratulations.

Pete Hughes, Williamsons funny little advance agent, " there arn't no flies on me," is keeping a pub in Melbourne. He has started a wig, not before he wanted one.

Leonard Harper, of Harper Brothers, Christchurch notoriety, is living in Spain. N.B. — There is no extradition treaty with the land of guitars and garlic.

Some of the Masons say that the election of Mr. H. D. 801 l as Grand Master shouldn't have been, that there were other and better men whose claims should have been considered before his.

Pity Scobie MacKenzie is out of the new Parliament. He made a capital speech the oth^r day when he got a typewriter as a present.. It was a Yost. Yost the very thing for a literary man like Scawbie, whose fist is a terror to the printers.

G. M. Yerex, who recently visited the American Prohibitionist State*, says that the sale of liquor is virtually annihilated in Maine and Kansas, that is of course publicly. Private persons get in supplies all the same.

Congratulations in advance. A daughter of Hon. Jock MacKenzieis to be married shortly to Mr. M. P. Cameron, of the well-known firm of Cameron & Christie, ironmongers, Wellington.

Kennedy Mac. has been talking lately of trying his luck in South Africa. Mac. has been very unlucky. He ought to do well if he goes to Johannesburg, but if he'll take our tip he'll stop here and live down adverse criticism. His great talents will bring him to the front again in time.

People are asking whether any of the old N.Z.L. and M. gang ore to be prosecuted. "Cooked" balance-sheets, misleading reports, and giving advances to themselves, are some of the charges indulged in against the old directors by irate shareholders.

Sir Maurice o'K.orke is first favourite for the Speakership, but Major Steward, u The white flower of a blameless life,"will make a fight for his old position. Buinour says that there will bea third candidate in the field. Sir Maurice is Fair Play's tip. If he can get over one little weakness of character, he's the man for Galway.

Bulletin says that a favourite expression of King Seddon's is " I am not Dick Seddon now, I'm Premier of Hew Zealand.'' Well, and if it is, why shouldn't the Premier Insist upon his dignity being respected ? It's all humbug to pretend that a leader

of the Democracy must necessarily make himself cheap. As a matter of fact, Mr. Seddon is too easy-going and is by no means given to any putting on of official " side."

The Parnell memorial. There will be a rumpus if that balance-sheet is not forthcoming very soon.

Mrs. Eobert Louis Stevenson was a grandmother before Robert married her.

" The advance towards Prohibition in Maoriland will atleaat retard woman suffrage in Australia" — that's what they say on the other side.

Phil May, if he does not succeed Harry Purniss on London Punch, will probably start a comic paper on his own account.

" The New Australia Czar," " Moses," " Don Lane," are some of the cognomens bestowed on the leader of the peteringout movement.

At Blenheim the other day the accompaniments at a local concert were played by a Mr. Kerkey, of Wellington. Needless to say they were " rekerkey."

A New Zealander — John McCormick — of Central Otago, has had his tender accepted (£109,000 odd) for erecting a bridge to replace the famous Victoria bridge at Brisbane, destroyed during the great flood.

Mr. J. H. Clayton, late of the Bush Advocate, Dannevirke, and previously of the Hastings Star, has bought the Marlborough Daily Times, Blenheim, and intends to make a firstclass paper of it.

Ex-Judge Seth Smith, of Native Land Court, is off to England to have another operation performed on his eyes. He was in England for the same trouble some fifteen months ago.

Miss Maive, late matron of the Dunedin hospital, has gone to Cairo to re-organise on her own system the large hospital in that city. The appointment is direct from the Egyptian Government, and is, we hear, a well paid one.

After a couple of years quarrelling, back-biting, envy, hatred, and all uncharitableness the London Tabernacle people have finally decided to allow the Eev. Thomas Spurgeon, late of Auckland, to succeed his father as pastor of that celebrated place of worship. The Eev. Thomas used to be known as the Eev. " Tommy Scourge 'em I" His wife, who has been living in the Northern city for some time past, now goes home to rejoin her husband.

When Christie Murray, the novelist, was brought up at London Police Court recently for wife desertion, the novelist admitted that he left Melbourne with a girl, who was now living with him at Kensington. Chrißtie Murray seems to have gone to the dogs when he took to the stage in Harry St. Maur's Company. He can still write a rattling good novel, however, and has recently done some excellent work, quite worthy of his earlier reputation. Buc woman, lovely woman, is evidently his weakness.

It's all stuff and nonsense about Premier Bosebery going to marry Princess Maud of Wales. He's twenty-three years older than Bhe is, and, although it is said she liies him, the Bulletin says very truly the " Eoyal Family could hardly stand a Guelph's children playing second fiddle to the half bred Hebrew offspring of a Scotch Peer." Eoseberry's first wife was Lady Hannah Bothschild, who brought him a perfect pile of dollars.

Rosebery suffers severely from insomnia, so the story goes. If this be true, he won't last long as Prime Minister. The

Rads, too, hate the idea of a Ministry being led by a member of the hated Upper House.

Nine of the principal hotels in Wellington are now absolutely closed on Sundays. Some of the smaller pubs, are doing a brisk business, but the Licensing Bench are not asleep— you bet.

A Wellington firm of printers (a " society " office) recently tendered for a certain job. Deducting the cost of n.aterial, the balance would pay the comps. about a third of the regulation rates.

W. B. Cadzowis wintering in Christchurch. He is running a series of popular concerts, which have " caught on" wonderfully. By the way, Mrs. Cadzow has just presented W.B. with a bouncing daughter.

The London Financial Times recently had a very hot article on the Harper crash. It was headed " A Colonial Balfour, or Plunder and Piety at the Antipodes." We are waiting to see if any of the big dailies will reprint it. Not likely.

Editor Hornsby, of Napier Evening News, goes to Christchurch to edit the Star, evening (reprint) edition of Lyttelton Times. If Mr. Hornsby is given a show he will put a lot of new life in the now feebly twinkling Christchurch orb.

Hornsby's successor on the Neios is genial little Kirby, who some years ago used to write Timaru Talk for the Lyttelton Times, and afterwards edited Marlborough Express.

Little Wilson, now editing the Nau Zealand Times weekly, the Mml, into which he has put a lot of new life, was boss of the Napier News for three years and made a great hit by his " Touchstone" articles which were widely quoted.

Bob Ahearne, now chief reporter on the Evening Press, was foi many years on Lyttelton Times as a sporting writer. We suppose the Press is too goody-goody to allow much turf gossip. If they want it, Bob's the very man.

A.sk E. D. Hoben, of the Post, how he got that famous bit nf news about Fox, and see him wink the other eye. Hoben runs rings round the other pressmen in the way of getting official and non-official Government information. He gets up very early in the morning when good items are about.

Ivo Evison, late of Catholic Times and Christchurch Truth, is now in Sydney. Eumour says that he is to start a weekly satirical paper in Wellington. He'll have to watch the libel law pretty carefully. Providence has a special down upon weekly papers in this country, as Fair Play knows to its cost. Evison is a very smart journalist and we wish him luck.

Captain Chatfield, long and favourably know as skipper of the Mararoa, has, at Ms own request, taken charge of the Rotoniahana. His home is in Melbourne, and by his change of boats he will be able to see his family more frequently. Skippers are but human — they want to see their wives and families now and again.

The special London correspondent of Melbourne Argus says : — " The Earl of Coventry is very proud of his son Henry, who has done something to restore credit to family name.' 1 The restoration of the family credit, over which the Earl is so h a Ppyi was merely the fact of the young man prodding a fat Matabele in the stummick with a bayonet. Some people are easily satisfied.

A London interviewer caught Sir George Grey in the " un-born-million" vein the other day. Our G.O.ftT. " dilated upon the destiny of the Anglo-Saxon race, the federation of which, he aid, would dominate the world, with its council meeting in

London, Washington, Sydney, Melbourne, and Auckland." Cheap advt. that for Auckland. The old man lovoth not Wellington, but all tho same that prospective council meeting, if ever held, will meot in tho Empire City.

Victoria has a nice little deficit of .£400,000 ; Now Zealand has a surplus of .£200,000.

Sir Robert Stout is reported to be suflbring so sovoroly from a bad throat as to be almost voicolos9. Wo don't wish you any harm, Kobert, but really if wo had anything to do with it wo would not rostoro your power of spocoh unless yon agreed to chuck that ofchor vice — palavoring on tho Ideal State, which you know to bo Tommy -rot.

In Melbourne Punch appears an illustration of tho scene in St. Peter's Church when that famous " No I" abruptly terminated tho marriage corcmony. Tho officiating minister isroproBentecl as a paunchy, pug-nosed, bald-hcadod old chap. Boy.. Mr. Watt oi-8 will feel ilattored.

A similar scene occurrod in Bullurat about four toon years ago. " Will you have this man for your lawful hu«band ?" asked tho clergy man. " No, I will not," was tho emphatic reply. " Then why aro you hero," aakod tho parson. " To tell him so," quoth she.

Mr. John Commons McVay, who was rocontly elected Prosisideut of tho Northern Bowling Association, in succession to Mr. J. Paul, of Now Plymouth, is well and popularly known in Hawko'B Bay. Born in Auckland in 1847, ho loft that city for Napior, when twenty years old, and after -tho lapso of ft low years ho entered into the saddling baainosi on his own account, and is now tho proprietor of a large o«tablishraent providing' employment for 85people, and doing an* extensive businessthroughout tho whole' district from Napier' to Patea on the one: hand, and "Wellington! on the other. MrMcVay has taken avery active interest in all affairs affecting the well-being of Napier ever since he first went to that district. He was prominent in the agitation which led to the adoption of the scheme for the Napier breakwater, now approaching completion, and till quite recently war-la ■ member of the Napier Harbour Board, He resigned that posF tion owing to pressure of private business, much to the regret of a large nuxnoer of the townspeople, bat he still holds his scat on the Municipal Council with which ho has been connected ever since the town was proclaimed a borough.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/periodicals/FP18940501.2.7

Bibliographic details

You Don't Say So!, Fair Play, Volume I, Issue 21, 1 May 1894

Word Count
2,040

You Don't Say So! Fair Play, Volume I, Issue 21, 1 May 1894

Working