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Pages 1 to 20

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Pages 1 to 20

C—l.

1937. NEW ZEALAND.

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEY. SETTLEMENT OF CROWN LANDS (ANNUAL REPORT ON).

Presentec[, to both Houses of the General Assembly by Command of His Excellency.

CONTENTS.

Genebal Report :— page Appendix II: — Review of Past Year . . .. 2 Land for Settlements— page Legislation .. . . .. 2 Summary of Settlements established .. 13 Land-development .. .. .. . . f2j) Extracts from Reports of Commissioners of Small Farms .. .. . . 4 Crown Lands — Special Settlement of Inferior Lands .. . . S North Auckland .. .. .. .. 21 Lands for Selection .. . . .. 6 Auckland .. .. .. 22 Receipts .. .. .. .. 6 Gisborne .. .. .. 22 Postponements, Remissions, and Arrears of Rent (§) Hawke's Bay .. .. .. 22 Rebates .. .. .. .. 6 Taranaki . . .. .. 22 National Endowment .. . . 6 Wellington . . .. .. .. 22 Educational Endowment .. .. .. 6 Nelson .. .. . . .. 22 Lands reserved for various Purposes .. .. 7 Marlborough .. . . .. 22 Expenditure .. .. .. 7 West,land \ .. .. .. .. 22 <nanterbu*w .. .. .. .. 23 Otago .. .. .. .. .. 23 Southland .. .. .. 23 Appendix 111 :— Land-drainage Operations .. .. .. 24 Appendix I : — Appendix IV :— Settlement of Crown Lands — Extracts from Report on Small Farms Scheme North Auckland .. .. .. 8 by A. B. Jordan, Superintendent of Land Auckland .. .. .. .. 8 Development, Te Kuiti .. .. 31 Gisborne .. .. .. .. 9 Hawke's Bay .. .. .. 9 Tables : — Taranaki .. .. .. .. 9 Table 1. —Lands of the Dominion, Position of Wellington .. .. .. 10 (approximately) .. .. 35 Nelson . . .. .. .. 10 „ 2. —Selections during the Year .. 36 Marlborough . . .. .. 10 „ CS^—All Lands held on Lease .. 36 Westland .. .. .. .. 11 „ 4. —Lands-for-settlement Lands .. 37 Canterbury .. .. .. ..11 „ —Endowment Lands leased and ad- 37 Otago .. .. .. .. ..11 ministered by Land Boards Southland .. .. .. 12 „ 6.—Receipts, Arrears, and Postponements 38

Sir, — Department of Lands and Survey, Wellington, Ist September, 1937. I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report on the settlement of Crown lands for the year ended 31st March, 1937, together with particulars of the special settlement of inferior lands, of the development-work that is being carried out on unoccupied Crown and settlement lands, and of the operations under the Small-farms Scheme. I have, &c., W. Robertson, Under-Secretary. The Hon. Frank Langstone, Minister of Lands,

I—o. l.

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REPORT.

Review of Past Yeak. The climatic conditions in most districts have during the past year been generally favourable for farming operations. While the rainfall was unusually heavy during the summer months, taken all round the year could be described as a good one from a productive point of view. An important feature of the year in so far as those engaged in the pastoral were concerned was the succession of very successful wool sales, the demand for all classes of wool proving to be exceptionally keen. The prices for fat lambs, beef cattle, and other classes of stock have been quite satisfactory and have contributed towards .placing pastoralist-s in an improved position. The dairy season has been a good one from a productive point of view, and as the result of an improved price for butterfat the average dairy-farmer is in a better position financially than has been the case for some years. In the early part of the season the prospects of those engaged in cropping were very promising ; but owing to an unseasonable summer in the grain-growing districts the crops suffered severe damage in some cases. Land revenue shows a substantial increase on last year's figures, while arrears of rent have decreased. A large number of applications under the Mortgagors and Lessees Rehabilitation Act, 1936, have been received, and the committees in the various districts are engaged in making inspections to facilitate adjustments. When the rehabilitation investigation has been completed and the adjustments have been made the accounts should be on a sound footing and Crown tenants generally should be in a position to face the future with confidence. The Department has continued to give careful attention to the necessity for bush-preservation and the protection of high and steep country generally, and in this most important matter is working in close co-operation with the State Forest Service. Far too much country has in the past been cleared of its forest cover in an endeavour to increase farming areas. It must be frankly admitted that the bush has been destroyed on hundreds of thousands of acres of steep country which at the time was regarded as suitable for settlement, but which painful experience has shown should never have been touched. Such country will not be opened for settlement in the future, and already arrangements have been made for extensive areas of Grown land to be set aside as permanent State forests and as scenic reserves. An earnest endeavour will also be made to repair certain mistakes made in the past, when pastoral licenses were granted more or less as a matter of course over extensive areas of high country, much of which in its natural state was extremely valuable for water-conservation and general protection purposes. It is proposed to make a careful review of the run country in certain localities, and to refrain whenever possible from granting any further pastoral licenses over lands that would have been better left unleased in the first place. Selections of Crown and settlement lands on all tenures during the year totalled 463,178 acres. This subject is dealt with more fully at a later stage of this report. At the 31st March the tenants on the books of the Department, excluding those established under the small-farms scheme, numbered 36,563, occupying a total area of approximately 18,650,000 acres. Pastoral runs account for 8,843,540 acres, while 1,830,935 acres of purchased estates are held under the provisions of the Land for Settlements Act. Legislation. The Reserves and other Lands Disposal Act, 1936, contains thirty-one clauses dealing with Crown lands, reserves, &c. Land-development. The operations of the Lands Development Board so far as unoccupied Crown land is concerned have been confined mainly to a continuation of work on the Galatea Estate, in the Auckland District, and on the Kakariki Estate, in Hawke's Bay, the net expenditure on developmental work having been £16,262 on the former and £12,453 on the latter. The Board has not given consideration to the undertaking of any work on new blocks of unoccupied Crown land, but extensive rehabilitation operations are controlled by the Small Farms Board and are reported upon under the heading of " Small-farms Scheme.'' The number of Crown tenants who have been assisted by way of loans to develop their own properties now totals 494, the amount advanced during the year being £7,915,

2

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Pursuant to section 10 of the Land Laws Amendment Act, 1929, the following summary of operations up to 31st March, 1937, is recorded :— (a) Ihe Several Areas of Unoccupied Crown Lands in respect of which Development-works have been undertaken during the Year. Auckland Land District:— Ngakuru Block, of 14,755 acres of light pumice land, fifteen miles from Rotorua : Developmentwork commenced in February, 1930, and results have been highly satisfactory. There are now thirty-nine dairy-farms at Ngakuru (including the sharemilkers' farms), with an aggregate area of 7,830 acres. The number of cows carried last season was 1,710. Galatea Estate, of 22,326 acres, near Murupara : Pending the completion of developmental work and the offering of this land for selection, the major portion is being successfully farmed as a sheep and cattle station. As at 31st March, 1937, the station stock consisted of 20,504 sheep and 5,902 cattle. The remainder of block comprises ten sharemilking farms and a demonstration farm. The stock carried by these eleven farms consists of 633 dairy cows, 20 bulls, 20 horses, 320 pigs. Towards the end of the year twenty-two sections with an area of 2,391 acres were offered for selection, and of these, sixteen sections with an area of 1,777 acres were selected on renewable lease. Particulars of the developmental work being undertaken are given in Appendix 111 in the report of the Land Drainage Branch of the Department. Hawke's Bay Land District:— Kakariki Estate, a purchased estate of 17,688 acres at Kotemaori: This block is intended to provide about ten holdings for sheep-farming. An area of 9,291 acres of new grass has been established, and live-stock carried is as follows : 15,800 sheep, 1,360 cattle, 32 horses. A successful farming year has been experienced, a net profit resulting after charging interest on all capital expenditure. Taranaki Land District:— lapuwae Estate, of 3,350 acres, a purchased estate in the King-country : This block is estimated to provide approximately eleven mixed farms. Two. thousand two hundred and sixty acres have been developed, and bush sickness has been successfully dealt with. The season has ended with a net farming profit after meeting interest 011 all capital expenditure. Live-stock consists of 5,730 sheep and 850 cattle.

(b) Total Cost of Development-works carried out to 31st March, 1937.

In addition to the expenditure on blocks set out above, expenditure lias been incurred on tlie roading, survey, &c., of various areas which are being developed by the settlers themselves. The total expenditure £386,871 for development, stock, roading, and surveys (apart from roading-costs payable out of Public Works Fund) up to the 31st March, 1937, provides for 616 farms,

3

Expenditure on E £P eil diture onj Total Expen- Net Development Development diture on Expenditure on alock - 3j st jiarcj, during Year Development Live-stock as lqoii ' ended 31st to 31st March, at 31st March, OD ' March, 1937. j 1937. 1937. North Auckland Land District. Wharekohe Block .. .. .. j 11,535 | 1,616 J 13,151 [ , £ Auckland Land District. Ngakuru Block .. .. .. 84,698 25 84,723 1,402 Te Kauwhata Block .. .. .. 32,176 .. 32,176 Onepu Block* .. .. .. .. 20,120 .. 20J20 Koromatua Block .. .. .. 4,163 303 4,466 Galatea Estate .. .. .. 82,834 16,262 99,'096 5^452 Whangamarino Block* .. .. .. 8,445 .. 8,445 Mangatutu Block .. .. .. 3,715 .. 3'715 Pongakawa Block* .. .. .. 3,764 .. 943 Arohena Block .. .. .. .. 207 207 Hawke's Bay Land District. Kakariki Estate .. .. .. | 30,398 | 12,453 | 42,851 | Taranaki Land District. Tapuwae Estate .. .. .. 13,873 9 13,882 9,686 295,721 30,875 326,596 17,483 * Whangamarino, Pongakawa, and part of Onepu Blocks taken over by Small Farms Board.

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(c) and (d) Developed Allotments disposed of.

(e) The Total Amount advanced to Crown Tenants for the Development, of their Holdings, the Number of Advances, and the Purpose for which such Advances have been made. Number of settlers assisted .. . ■ • • • • • • 494 Loans approved — £ Improvements .. •• •• •• 216,865 Stock 8.597 Total .. •• •• •• •• •• £.225,462 Amounts actually advanced — £ Improvements .. .. •• •• •• •• 176,925 Stock .. .. •• •• •• •• 1)813 Total £1 TO >738 Small-farms Scheme. During the year there has been comparatively little extension of the area included in the smallfarms scheme, the main item being the furtherance of the land-development operations, which have been very successful. The principal reason for not launching out on new work has been the need for the Board to take into account the fact that three-eighths of the wages-cost of development has, from Ist June last, been charged to capital, and, therefore, must be loaded on to the land. As mentioned in the report of last year, much of the land being developed or available for development is " marginal " land which cannot be developed economically by ordinary settlement, and which cannot bear any portion of the labour-costs ; and the Board could not conscientiously undertake additional work on such lands, knowing that there would be losses of capital. Several of the development blocks were completed sufficiently to permit of their being subdivided and the sections placed under the individual management of the occupiers, who were allotted herds for milking. In no case has a tenure been given, but, where the revenue is sufficient, the occupiers have been allowed to collect a proportion of the dairy cheques ; in other cases, the men have remained on a wage basis of £4 per week, less 10s. per week rent for cottage. The carrying-capacity and production have increased enormously in the case of most of the blocks, and this will" be seen from a perusal of the reports of the Superintendent of Land Development and the Chief Drainage Engineer in respect of the blocks under their control. For example, six blocks under the control of the latter have produced 223,961 lb. of butterfat, representing an increase in the case of each individual block of from 50 per cent, to 100 per cent, over the previous year. In the four main blocks mentioned in last year's report butterfat-production has increased in value by 80 per cent., wool by 168 per cent., and pigs by 115 per cent. Full details of production will be found in the appendices. . Of the individual holdings settled, apart from the larger development blocks, be said safely that, generally, they are a success. In every case of the purchase of " one-man " farms the Board was extremely conservative in the matter of valuations, and a fair price only was paid, which is, no doubt the real reason for the rapidity with which the tenants are finding their feet and beginning to pay their way. In a number of cases in the North Auckland and Auckland Districts men are milking from thirty to forty cows (in some exceptional cases the figures are higher still) with capital charges of approximately £1,000 only ; and these men in ordinary conditions cannot fail to prosper. Such properties as these are, unfortunately, not now forthcoming ; in fact, it was found during the year that so small a percentage of properties offered was measuring up to the Board's standards of valuation and carrying-capacity, as well as complying with the requirement that their purchase should not throw the vendors" on to the labour market, that the Board withdrew its invitation to applicants to locate and submit particulars of individual farms suitable for purchase. This was a big disappointment to the applicants, but much expense in making fruitless inspections, both by the Board's officers and by the applicants themselves, was saved.

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Number of Rental Annual Rent Block. Allotments Area. j Tenure. Capital or Interest disposed of. Value. receivable. ! ! -— Acres. £ £ s. d. Wharekohe " 996 RL - 9 > 595 f79 lb _ ° . fEX. 8,325 416 5 0 TeKauwhata .. .. •• 6,165 369 1 6 0neml * 13 1,356 EX. 12,285 614 5 0 Koromatua .. .. •• •• 4 538 EX. 2,900 145 0 0 Mangatutu .. .. •• •• 5 771 EX. 4,680 234 0 0 Ngakura .. .. ■■ • • 20 3,155 EX. 26,491 1,324 11 0 Total 71 8,551 .. 70,441 3,582 17 6 * In addition, eleven sections selected under small-farms scheme.

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The pakihi development-work in the Westport District has continued fairly satisfactorily, and over 1,000 acres in a compact block are now in hand. The results to date are encouraging, so far as they go, but the farming of this class of country is more or less experimental, and the Board has decided not to extend the work any further until there has been some actual experience of how it will stand up to dairying for a season or two. If dairy stock does well and the land retains its pasture there is ample land of this type in the Nelson Land District for future expansion. The largest individual area under development by the Board is the Ahuriri Lagoon, 7,595 acres, near Napier, which was raised from the sea during the earthquake of 1931. This is being drained! roaded, and developed, with a view to its ultimate subdivision and settlement. The main gravity outfall has been completed, the electric pumps being in operation, and the whole area behind the stop-banks being dewatered. The subsidiary drainage of the 5,000 acres (approximately) to the north of the main gravity outfall is being proceeded with, and the ring-fencing of this area is being hastened with a view to stocking as soon as possible. On portions of the southern end the salt content has decreased sufficiently to sow grass during last autumn. Two hundred and eighty acres is being put in permanent pasture, and 24 acres is being sown in barley and oats. An area of approximately 750 acres on which it is not yet considered advisable to fill in subsidiary drains is being sown in temporary pasture to provide grazing for stock, arid thus check weed-growth. The area south of the main gravity outfall. 2,000 acres approximately, is being ring-fenced preparatory to stocking. Experimental cropping will be carried out next spring on an area of 60 acres to serve as a guide in the development of further areas in the future. Altogether the work is proceeding very satisfactorily. The original small-farms-scheme holdings of 5 acres to 10 acres are gradually diminishing in numbers, due mainly to the occupiers resuming their former occupations, although in some cases where the terms of the agreements to lease are expiring the Board has decided not to renew, because of the uneconomic nature of the holdings. Altogether twenty-seven of these holdings have been closed during the year. Since the beginning of the scheme 810 men have received sustenance allowances from the Employment Promotion Fund, but as at the 31st March, 1937, only 101 men were on sustenance, indicating a steady improvement in the revenue derived by the occupiers. Results of the Scheme to the 31st March, 1937, are tabulated as under :— Operations under Original Scheme (mostly 5-acre and 10-acre Sections). Holdings established .. .. .. .. .. .. ~ Number of such holdings since closed .. .. .. .. .. 135 Share milkers' cottage loans approved .. .. .. .. .. 265 Share milkers' cottage loans repaid .. . . .. .. .. 22 Operations since Small Farms Board constituted. Number. , A Area , (Acres). Individual holdings established .. .. .. .. 365 24,522 Sections included in blocks under development .. .. 594 53,799 Area under development, but not sectionized .. .. .. 5 761 Share milkers' cottage loans approved .. . . .. 66 Average number of men employed on development-work during year .. 1,067 Total number who have received sustenance .. .. .. ~ 810 Number in receipt of sustenance at 31st March, 1937 .. .. .. 101 Further details in regard to operations under the small-farms scheme are given in Appendices 111 and IV in the reports of the Chief Drainage Engineer, and of the Superintendent of Land Development, Te Kuiti, respectively. Full statements of accounts are published in parliamentary paper 8.-l [Part IV]. Special Settlement of Inferior Lands. The following summary of the lands dealt with during the year is furnished in accordance with the provisions of section 223 (14) of the Land Act, 1924. (а) Aggregate area of land set apart : Nil. (б) Number of allotments and aggregate area disposed of : Nil. The total number of allotments taken up and the area held as at 31st March, 1937, was thirty-five allotments, 7,256 acres.

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Lands for Selection. During the year 463,178 acres were taken up on various tenures, the number of selections being J,342 under all headings. These figures include some 707 sections, comprising altogether an area of 64,813 acres taken up under miscellaneous leases and licenses, so that the selections on permanent tenures numbered 635 sections, covering a total area of 398,365 acres, "lhe following table gives the selections of Crown lands for the last five years : Selections under all Tenures. Year ending Number. (Acres). 31st March, 1933 1.354 280,518 31st March, 1934 .. . . ■ ■ ..1,118 285,166 31st March, 1935 .. .. •• •• 1,036 302,915 31st March, 1936 .. .. •• ..1,037 210,026 31st March, 1937 •• 1,342 463,178 The total of 463,178 acres selected during the year includes lands taken up under both permanent and temporary tenures, and also town and suburban lands. The permanent selections of rural lan s only were as follows : —

The lands dealt with above comprise both areas offered for the first time and areas which became available for reoffering through various reasons. The figures for entirely new rural areas selected during the year are as follows : —

Receipts. The receipts for the year from all sources (excluding, of course, Discharged Soldiers Settlement Account receipts) totalled £1,402,596, an increase of £126,086 on last year's figures. The receipts for the last five years have been as follows: Year ending 31st March, 1933, £742,820 ; 1934, £1,020,198 ; 1935, £1,259,790 ; 1936, £1,276,510 ; 1937, £1,402,596. Postponements, Remissions, and Abreabs of Rent. Rents, the payment of which remained postponed at the 31st March, amounted to £98,593. Arrears of'rent at the 31st March (including arrears in respect of the current half-yearly charge) totalled £94-2,858, while remissions for the year totalled £170,977. Rebates. For prompt payment of rent 17,195 Crown tenants were granted the usual rebates in terms of section 123 of the Land Act, 1924, and section 59 of the Land for Settlements Act, 1925. These rebates amounted to a total of £41,798. National Endowment. Of the area in the national endowment, 6,449,230 acres were held under lease or license at the 31st March by 4,311 tenants paying an annual rental of £137,582, while a very large area (partly, however, covered by existing leases) had been set aside as provisional State forests, tor further particulars re the national endowment see parliamentary paper C.—l 4. Educational Endowments. An area of approximately 797,292 acres of education endowments under the administration of the various Land Boards is leased to some 4,147 tenants, who pay a total animal rental of £125,610

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Number of Rural Total Area Class of Land. Sections selected. selected. Acres. Crown and national-endowment land .. ■ • 214 215,158 Settlement land .. ■■ •• •• „ ' Education reserves, &c. .. •• •• •• ' Grand totals .. • • ■ • • • 282 225,422

Number of New Rural j Total Area selected Class of Land. Sections selected. for the First Time. Acres. Crown and national-endowment land .. 64 59,853 Settlement land .. •• •• •• > Educational reserves, &c. .. ■ ■ • • • • '' ' Grand totals . • • • • • • •

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Land reserved for various Purposes. Under the provisions of section 360 of the Land Act, 1924, and section 71 of the Land for Settlements Act, 1925, various areas of Crown and settlement land were permanently reserved during the year. The reservations made totalled seventy-four, covering an area of approximately 4,951 acres. A summary of work carried out under the heading is given below. Purpose of Number of Area. Reserve. Reservations. a. e. p. Aerodrome .. .. .. .. 5 587 0 39 Aerodrome reserve, addition to .. 1 28 0 23 Cemetery . . . . .. .. 2 3 3 36 Gravel .. .. .. .. .. 5 18 0 23 High-school site .. .. .. .. 1 6 20• 30 Landing reserve .. .. . . . . 1 9 10 Plantation .. .. .. .. 20 1,080 2 18-60 Public-hall site .. .. .. .. 3 1 1 39 •60 Public-pound site . . . . .. .. 1 0 0 30 Public-school site .. .. .. .. 7 18 1 22 Public-school site, addition to .. .. 3 1 2 07-01 Railway afforestation .. .. .. 1 2,773 1 24-10 Recreation .. .. .. .. 21 386 2 31-92 Resting-place for travelling stock .. .. 3 35 2 25 •50 74 4,951 1 0-03 The above does not include areas that have been vested in the Crown as public reserves in town subdivisions pursuant to the provisions of section 16 of the Land Act, 1924.

Expenditure. Summary of Expenditure approved during the Year ended 31st March, 1937.

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Name of Vote or Account. Net Amount ! Gross Recoveries I * et voted. | Expenditure. recoveries. Expenditure. Vote, Lands and Survey— £ £ £ £ Subdivision I .. .. .. .. .. 188,900 276,921 90,869 186,052 Subdivision II .. .. .. .. .. 205,558 208,834 40 208,794 Subdivision III .. .. .. .. .. 12,820 7,106 52 7,054 Total, Vote. Lands and Survey .. .. 407,278 492,861 90,961 401,900 Vote, Land for Settlements .. .. .. .. 400,000 169,983 95 169,888 Discharged Soldiers Settlement Account: Vote, Expenses 91,500 73,008 .. 73^008 of Management Vote, Swamp Land Drainage — Hauraki Plains District .. .. .. .. 25,710 30,505 7,919 22,586 Swamp Land Drainage Districts .. .. .. 4,290 2,705 326 2 379 Vote, Settlement of Unemployed Workers .. .. 425,000 305,621 213,605 92^016 Vote, Dairy Industry Loans ' .. . . . . . . 90,000 30,510 !. 30^510 Totals •• •• •• 1,443,778 1,105,193 312,906 792,287 Other Accounts. Land for Settlements— Expenditure from capital proceeds of the sale of Crown and National 8,633 8,633 Endowment lands Interest and other charges .. .. .. .. .. 87,120 .. 87,120 Expenditure under special Acts of Legislature—Section 295 (2) Land Act, 6,853 . . 6^853 1924 : Administration expenses of national-endowment lands Discharged Soldiers Settlement Account . . .. .. .. 541 s 646 . . 54] 646 General Purposes Account : Ellesmere Land Drainage Act, 1905, section 6 439 . . '439 Expenditure approved by the Hon. the Minister of Finance from Unauthorized 147 .. 147 Expenditure Account Refunds of revenue,'Deposit Account expenditure, expenditure under special 25,451 .. 25,451 Acts of the Legislature Totals .. .. .. .. .. .. 1,775,482 312,906 1,462,576

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APPENDICES.

APPENDIX I.—SETTLEMENT OF CROWN LANDS. EXTRACTS FROM THE REPORTS OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF CROWN LANDS.

NORTH AUCKLAND. (W. D. Armit, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) The weather conditions during the past year have been generally favourable to the farming community. The continued rainfall throughout the district was responsible for a good growth of grass, and consequent on the mild winter the dairy herds came into profit in good condition. The production of butterfat, cheese, and wool showed a marked increase, as did also the returns of all classes of fat and store stock. The guaranteed price of butterfat has been beneficial to the dairy-farmers, and this combined with increased production has placed them in a better position financially. Wool, fat lambs, store stock, and dairy cows commanded satisfactory on the market this season, and present appearances point to higher prices ruling for good-quality dairy cows and heifers when close to profit. Top-dressing has again been the keynote to success, thus ensuring the upkeep of pastures and also maintaining the Department's securities. The wisdom of making refunds for the purpose of purchasing manures has been borne out by the increased revenue received. An abundance of hay and ensilage has been made this season, thus ensuring a plentiful supply of winter feed. _ _ ... . . , It is now recognized by dairy-farmers that the raising of pigs as a sideline is a big factor m building up revenue, but more attention should be given to proper housing and better feeding. The chilled-beef trade is rapidly becoming very popular, and when proper equipment in all overseas vessels is installed more advantage will be taken by producers in the North. The outlook for the citrus and passion-fruit grower looks decidedly hopeful this year, as in addition to a passion-fruit pulping factory at Kerikeri, an up-to-date lemon-curing factory has just been completed. Flooding of the low-lying areas occasioned hardship to a number of tenants, but there was less damage to grassland compared with the previous year. No fresh blocks of Crown lands were opened for selection during the year, but isolated sections amounting to approximately 8,000 acres were selected under various tenures. Several mangrove-reclamation areas have been stop-banked and handed over to this Department by the Public Works Department for disposal. Negotiations are in progress with adjoining settlers for selection of these lands, it being generally found that " run off " areas are essential for successful farming of mangrove flats. Advances for land-development are still being made, and those settlers to whom loans have been granted have in a majority of cases sufficient pasture established to enable them to meet their rent and interest charges. The prevalence of ragwort is causing some anxiety in the North, but settlers realize the danger, and with the assistance of the Department of Agriculture and the County Councils it is being kept well in check. White butterfly, which caused a lot of damage last year to root crops, is not so apparent this year. On the whole there appears to be a brighter outlook and more confidence amongst the Crown tenants, and this should be more apparent when the adjustments under the Mortgagors and Lessees Rehabilitation Act are completed.

AUCKLAND. (K. M. Gbaham, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) Following a satisfactory summer season for dairying last year this district experienced a wonderfully good winter, for," though there were heavy frosts, fine weather prevailed and the pastures did not suffer to any great extent. The spring came in with an abundance of feed, and frequent rains throughout the whole of the dairying season have kept pastures green and there has been if anything an over abundance of feed for stock. . The sheep-farmers have also experienced a splendid season, despite some late shearing owing to wet and unfavourable weather whilst shearing was in progress. Good lambing was the general experience, and the percentages of lambing were in many cases exceptionally high. The prevailing high prices for wool, lamb, and beef cattle have all contributed towards making the 1936-37 season one of the best recorded. The usual demand for suitable dairy-farms and for farms where mixed farming can be carried on has been consistent throughout the year.

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GISBORNE. (H. L. Primrose, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) With wool-prices very substantially on the high side and stock prices very satisfactory, I have pleasure in reporting one of the best years for sheep-farmers for a long period. Taken all through, the year has been a fairly wet one, and the summer months did not altogether live up to their reputation for lengthy spells of bright sunshine. Still, feed was very plentiful, and that is a big thing for the farming community generally. As surmised last year, when high prices ruled for breeding ewes, most farmers who go in for the fat-lamb trade and have to buy in fresh ewes each year, found they had to pay very dearly for their requirements. The Waikato demand has been partly responsible for this, and the trade with that part continues to improve, approximately 350,000 sheep from this district finding a ready market there. There seems to have been a tendency for more top-dressing of hill-country lands, and I expect that the wisdom of this course will be more fully appreciated in the next few years, especially if present prices continue. There is no doubt that in many instances that have come under my notice the policy has been a paying one. A local industry that seems to be making quite good progress is the growing of lemons and sweet oranges. Evidence goes to show that the latter can be produced on a commercial scale. Our fertile loam soils produce big trees carrying heavy annual crops for which a ready market is found. Shipments of lemons increased by nearly 100 per cent, and over 2,926 cases were shipped last season. There is quite a good opening here for many Crown tenants with small areas of suitable soil. Another feature is the steady improvement being effected on blackberry-infested country, principally as a result of the use of goats. This is very noticeable round about the Wairoa District. In the coastal area north of Gisborne some parts of the country are suffering considerably from erosion during heavy rain. The area so affected is rather extensive, and it is a matter that must eventually aifect valuations of properties. In such country the rainfall is very heavy, reaching up to 100 in. towards the main ridges in Matakaoa and Waiapu Counties. Facial eczema was much less prevalent than in the two previous years, but has by no means died out yet. Dairy-farmers have had plenty of feed, and butterfat returns have kept up for a longer period. All through the year there has been quite a steady demand for medium-sized sheep-farms, and also for dairy-farms. Generally, the prospects of the farming community in this district have not- been so bright for years.

HAWKE'S BAY. (F. R. Burnley, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) Climatic conditions generally during the past season have been more favourable than usual, resulting in a plentiful supply of feed through the summer. Production on dairy-farms has consequently been maintained, and, with the welcome improvement shown in prices for wool and stock, sheep-farmers also have had a very successful year. With a view to increasing the carrying capacity, farmers are still taking advantage of subsidies under unemployment-relief schemes, principally for the purpose of fencing, scrub-cutting, and draining. Orchardists have had a disastrous season. Late frosts ruined portion of the crop and a hailstorm and frost in February did further damage. In some cases the whole crop was lost. This class of settler will again have difficulty in meeting charges. The arrears position shows considerable improvement, partly due to concessions granted, but mainly owing to increased incomes. The revenue for the year shows an increase of over £5,000 on the previous year.

TARAJSfAKJ. (A. F. Waters, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) Tlie weather on the whole has not been so unfavourable for farming operations as in the previous year, although there were some unusual features. The autumn was good and there was plenty of feed to start the winter with. Cold conditions set in early in May, being ushered in by a very severe storm which, however, did not do a great deal of damage. The weather continued severe until July. An exceptionally mild August of springlike conditions followed, but again the winter reasserted itself, and unseasonable weather was the riile until well into the normal summer. Production of butterfat was well maintained over the year, and towards the close of the season showed an increase over the previous season's figures. With increased production and a guaranteed price, the average dairy-farmer is in a much better position than in any year since the slump, and in the majority of cases there should be no difficulty in meeting ordinary recurring payments. The sheep-farmer has had a very good year. The wool clip was greater than for the previous year and, while the quality was much the same, there was less of the log-stained wool in evidence. The prices obtained were far above last year's figures. The lambing percentage was good, but there were heavy losses due to the rough weather, principally in the northern part of the district. The wild-pig trouble is still unabated, and until this menace can be controlled there will continue to be heavy losses of lambs. During the year there were twenty-one selections of farms, totalling an area of 4,460 acres. The revenue for the year was over £57,000, an increase of 13-4 per cent, on the previous year's figure. This is very satisfactory.

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WELLINGTON. (H. W. C. Mackintosh, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) Throughout the year just closed weather conditions were most erratic. Following on a favourable autumn the winter was cold, and wet weather conditions prevailed throughout spring and summer. The plenteous rainfall produced a rank growth of grass which assisted butterfat-production but militated somewhat against the best results from early fat lambs. In most localities very few lambs were sold before Christmas, and it was well on in January before the flush were ready. In the dairying districts of southern Wairarapa, which usually dry up badly in hot summers, there has been an abundance of rain, and the longer growing period has made considerable difference to production. In the wetter northern areas of the Wairarapa the season, although good for dairying, has proved rather too wet, and returns will no doubt be about the same level as the previous season. In many cases haymaking operations were hampered by wet-weather conditions and less than the average amount of hay was saved. In other cases, however, where the winter was relatively mild farmers have been able to carry over reserves of hay from last year and stock should be sufficiently provided for this coming winter. The guaranteed price for butterfat has had the effect of stabilizing the prices for dairy stock, dairy cows averaging about £8 or £9. Well-bred run or station cattle commanded high prices, while yearling steers of this class in some localities realized as high as £7, with a correspondingly high price for beef cattle. Sheep-farmers have experienced a good year, prices for both wool and stock having been much better than for some time past. Fat-lamb prices have been good and altogether the pastoralist should be able to meet Ms commitments and have something over for top-dressing and maintenance of buildings, fencing, &c. It is pleasing to note that many settlers are painting their houses and farm buildings. The better prices obtained for butterfat, wool, &c., have encouraged many farmers to top-dress their pastures, and a consequent improvement in revenue returns has been manifest. There is still room for more to be done in this direction, but this work will no doubt be undertaken more generally when its advantages are more widely realized. The prices ruling for farm produce have created a keen demand for land, and any worth-while areas coming into the market are well applied for.

NELSON". (P. E. Wilkinson, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) The 1936-37 season has again been remarkable for the amount of summer rain right through the summer months with an absence of the usual dry, warm spells. Owing to the wet season lambing percentages were lower than for many years and the mortality amongst young sheep was very high in most localities. There was an abundance of summer feed, and sufficient winter feed is available. Hop-growers have bad a bad season owing to much wet weather, the returns having dropped at least 25 per cent, on last season. The apple crop has been only medium, caused through unfavourable weather conditions. The total export for the season will be in the vicinity ot 604,000 cases. The market opened up on the low side for cookers, but dessert varieties about equal the prices paid last year. The growers, however, should be materially assisted by the guaranteed prices. Heavy frosts in the early part of the year caused considerable damage to tobacco crops in part of the district.

MARLBOROUGH. (G. I. Maktin, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) Generally the farming community in this district has experienced a good year. The continuance since last season of a reasonably fair rainfall over most parts of the district has removed the fear of drought, and this, coupled with a sound export price for lamb and the high prices obtaining for all classes of wool, has been reflected in a more confident and spirited activity in the market for store sheep. Those engaged in agricultural farming have recorded good average yields, but there would seem to be a tendency for those on the lighter and poorer lands to persist in this type of farming to their disadvantage. In this respect there is still a marked absence of the use of lime and fertilizers, and though the benefit accruing from their use is generally appreciated the high cost of both in this district limits their application. An increased area has been grassed down this season and this can be attributed partly to a general rise in the price of wool and sheep and a realization that continued cropping does not pay. Dairy-farmers have shown no appreciably increased outputs on last year, despite a favourable season, and it is to be hoped that, when charges are brought into relation with the producing capacity of their holdings, settlers will be in a position to make a more liberal use of lime and manure.

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WESTLAND. (B. King, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) As the rainfall during the latter half of the past year was some 20 in. above normal with the sunshine recorded showing a corresponding decrease, the past season has been anything but a favourable one for the farming interests. Although there has been an abundant supply of feed it is anticipated that the returns of butterfat per cow will be considerably below those of the previous year, but with the higher prices ruling the gross income will show a decided increase. Although the climatic conditions were unfavourable for dairying, they have in no way affected grazing pursuits, and graziers of both sheep and cattle have experienced a good season. Lambing percentages were well maintained, most flocks showing 100 per cent, and over, and prices realized for fat lambs in most cases exceeded expectations. The total revenue for the year was £17,299 18s. lid., as against £14,432 Bs. Bd., an increase of approximately £3,000.

CANTERBURY. (N. C. Kensington, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) The weather conditions in the early part of the year were unfavourable to the agricultural farmer, but favoured the pastoralist in that heavy rains extended into March and April. Cultivation for supplementary feed and crops was retarded. Fortunately, winter was comparatively mild except for rains in July. Spring was later than usual, but November rains had beneficial effect, and prospects for good harvest appeared assured. Continuous heavy rain for three months, however, did heavy damage to crops. Though stock came through winter very well the heavy rains were against the fattening of lambs, the feed being soft and rank, with consequent mortality. Harvesting and shearing were held up unduly. Pastoralists in high country had a good year, there being no serious snow losses. There was a fair average lambing, and all surplus store sheep and lambs brought the highest prices for years. The wool clips were good and brought excellent prices. Dairy-farmers had the most successful season for a long period. Production was well maintained and stability of prices was a satisfactory feature. Orchardists had a fair year, but tomato-growers had a bad season owing to cold rains and heavy frosts. Taking everything into consideration, it has been a good season, as the high prices obtained for most farm produce have greatly improved the general outlook of many farmers.

OTAGO. (F. H. Waters, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) From the general reports by the Field Inspectors the past year has been a good one as regards the prices for wool, lambs, and surplus stock. Dealing with the high-country runs conditions were somewhat varied, the north-western part of the district experiencing good winter conditions with low losses, while the high-country runs in the north-east suffered through some heavy drifting snowstorms, with considerable losses and a poor lambing percentage. In North Otago the settlers on the lower country have had an excellent season, lambs fattening well and good prices being obtained for the coarser wools. The southern part of the district has not been so fortunate, as a very broken spring and summer has been experienced. Lambs have not fattened well, and harvesting operations have been greatly delayed and crops spoilt. The turnip crop is not up to the usual standard, and on the low-lying areas near Balclutha serious flooding in November and December has had a marked effect on the dairy returns. In Central Otago the showery weather experienced was most beneficial, and reports show that good barley crops have been grown on the Hawea Flats. There has been a splendid growth of grass, and excellent returns from wool and lambs. Unfortunately, the weather experienced in Central Otago has not been beneficial to the orchardists and the growers of small fruits. With little bright sunshine the crops have not ripened well, while a severe frost which occurred in October did a good deal of damage in scattered areas, principally to the stone-fruit. It is expected that the apple crop will show a better return, and this may improve the position. The different schemes for the conservation of water for irrigation purposes have been pushed ahead by the Public Works Department, and settlers who come within these schemes are now able to bring areas under irrigation, which should be reflected in the near future in an increase in flocks and the fattening of lambs. In reviewing matters over the past year, it can safely be said that the average settler has had an increased return and his position has improved accordingly.

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SOUTHLAND. (T. Cagney, Commissioner of Crown Lands.) The district enjoyed a favourable autumn and mild winter with ample supplies of winter feed available for all classes of stock. The spring, however, was an unusually wet one, and this class of weather prevailed throughout the period, making the present season one of the wettest experienced for a considerable number of years. Owing to the unsuitable climatic conditions sowings of root and green crops were late and growth was retarded by wet cold weather, with the result that the yields will be disappointing and farmers will have to depend mainly on hay for supplementary winter feed for stock. It is satisfactory to note that most farmers saved fair supplies of hay during suitable breaks in the weather. At the close of the period a strong flush of grass was noticeable throughout the district, and this will, to some extent, provide good grazing well into the winter. Oat and other seed crops showed remarkable promise earlier in the season, but the weather seriously affected the successful harvesting of these and a considerable shortage in seed output may be expected. Back-country runholders, in common with farmers on the lower levels, enjoyed a remarkably good winter. No serious snow loss of stock was reported. Lambs generally fattened reasonably well, but were retarded to some extent by the softness of the pasture. Ragwort is still very much in evidence throughout the district. This weed thrives mainly on dairy-farms, but can be effectively controlled by running a few sheep with the dairy herd or, as an alternative, applying sodium chlorate, which may be used either as a powder or in a diluted form and may be procured at a reasonably cheap rate. An apathetic attitude is adopted by many farmers towards controlling this pest. Notwithstanding good prices for rabbit-skins of late, the rabbit nuisance is still much in evidence. With favourable prices ruling throughout' the season, particularly for wool and sheep, a generally buoyant tone is the natural result, and farmers, notwithstanding weather drawbacks, have enjoyed a lucrative year.

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APPENDIX lI.—LAND FOR SETTLEMENTS.

Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937.

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I I " ; ! i ' Name of Estate. j | Principal Purpose for which Holdings are utilized. Present North Auckland. Aponga .. . . 9 .. Dairying and grazing .. .. . . Very fair. Awanui . . .. 6 1 Dairying .. .. .. . . Good Bickerstaife ... .. 39 .10 Grazing . . ., .. . . f Bayliss .. . . 1 .. Dairying .. .. .. ., Fair. Cadman .. .. 1 .. Grazing .. . . .. Good Carroll .. .. 16 10 Homes Very fair. Cradock .. . . , . [4 Homes and orchards Creadon .. . . 4 .. Run-off . . . . .. .. Fair Eccleston . . .. 10 16 Homes .. Finlayson .. .. 1 .. Grazing .. .. .. .. pôô r , Hetana .. .. 2 87 Homes and orchards .. .. .. Very good Kitchener .. .. 1 12 „ .. .. . s Koremoa .. .. 13 .. Dairying and grazing .. Lawry .. .. 1 .. Grazing . . .. .. .. Good. Viethuen .. ,. 1 29 Homes and orchards .. .. .. Motutara . . .. 12 . . Dairying and grazing . . .. .. Very fair. Otarao .. .. 3 .. Dairying .. .. .. .. Good. £ a f™ta • • • • 2 .. „ Fair. rakaraka .. 15 1 Parahi .. . . 9 .. Dairying and grazing . . .. .. Very fair. Prescott .. .. 3 17 Homes .. .. .. .. .. Good. Plumer .. .. 4 17 Puketi . . .. .. .. Grazing ■ 11 .. Dairying .. . . .. .. Fair. Remuera .. 31 1 „ Very fair. Streamlands .. . . 12 I ,, .. ., ,. Good Tangowahine .. 19 1 Dairying and grazing .. .. .. Poor. Tauraroa .. .. 2 .. Dairying .. .. .. .. Very fair. Te Pua .... 4 1 Tokiri .. .. 4 .. „ ; ;; Upokonui .. .. 5 .. " " Good. Waari .. .. 26 40 Homes and orchards .. .. .. Waimata .. .. 15 . . Dairying Waiteitei .. . . 9 2 „ .. .! !! !! Very fair. Whakata .. .. 6 .. ,, .. .. .. ,, Good. Totals .. 297 260 Auckland. Apata, .. .. 7 1 Dairying .. .. .. .. Good. Balachraggan .. 18 8 „ .. .. .. .. Verv good Bushmere .. .. 2 .. „ SaZfactory. Sford .. .. 8 1 „ Good . Delaney .. .. 1 .. Home .. Fencourt .. .. 8 39 Dairying and mixed farming .. .. Very good Gorton .. .. 10 .. ,, .. Hannon .. .. 2 .. Good" Hereford Park .. 2 .. Dairying " .. .. !! Unsatisfactory. Hikuai .. .. 20 1 Dairying and mixed farming .. .. Good. Horahia 6 Horahora .. .. 7 3 Kaipaki . . .. 4 .. ; 5 ara p iro 7 vêr yg ood. Kopuku .... 3 1 „ .... Fair Kopuku (2) .... 3 2 Mangaotama.. .. 3 1 „ .. " Very good. Mangakura 6 Mangapouri .... 2 13 „ Mangateparu.. ..53 3 ,, " Mangawhero .... 8 20 ,, Matamata .. .. 62 271 „ " Matuku .. 11 , , _ _ t " Morgan .. . . 4 .. Dairying .. .. .. .. Satisfactory. Nelson ..... 3 .. ,, Ngahinapouri .. .31 „ .. .. .. Very good. Norwegians .. .. 2 1 ,, .. .. .. .. Satisfactory. Nolan .. .. 5 Ohauiti .. . . 10 2 ,, .. .. .. ., Unsatisfactory. Okauia .. .. 6 11 „ .. .. .. .. Fajj., Omeheu .. .. 10 .. „ .. .. .. .. Good. Opouriao .. .. 29 71 „ .. .. .. .. Very good. Ormi .. .. 2 .. „ .. .. .. .. p air . Orongo .. .. 32 3 ,, .. .. .. . , Fair, improving. Otamarakau .. .. 7 .. ,, .. .. .. . . Very good. Otway .. .. 8 10 Pakarau .. .. 17 ! 7 " • • • • »

C.—l.

Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937 —continued.

14

Toaap. TTrpp- . , i-ittu. .... , I Remarks as to Present Name of Estate. jjjjg® Principal Purpose for which Holdings are utilized. j Position. Auckland —continued. Pukemapou .. .. 11 Dairying .. . . .. -• Very good Puketarata .. • • 5 . . „ ■ • ■ ■ • ■ ■ ■ Good. Puahue .. .. 16 5 Dairying and mixed farming . . . . ,, Rangiatea .. . • 5 22 Dairying .. ■ • • ■ • • Very good. Rangitaiki .. . . 8 .. Dairying, small farming .. . . .. „ Reporoa .. • • 99 15 Dairying and grazing . . . . • • Good. Rewi .. .. 6 6 Dairying .. •• ■■ • X er yg°°f' , , Reynolds .. .. 21 4 „ Good to doubtful. Roekburn .. .. 1 • • >> • • ■ • ■ • • ' ī, alr j IRiotoniā/iinkH/ • • 1 •• • • • • • • (jood. Selwyn .. • ■ 58 196 Dairying and mixed farming .. . . Very good. Tahaia .. •• 11 ■■ Dairying .. •• •• • • . » Tainui .. .. 2 1 Grazing .. • • • ■ • • * air Tairua .. • • 19 7 Residential and farmlets .. .. • • Good. Taniwha .. 10 2 Dairying .. •• •• •• ,, Tangao .. .. 1 • • „ * alr ' , Tapapa .. .. 10 .. „ Very goo.d. Tautari .. •• 35 11 Business and residence .. .. ■■ Fair to doubtful. Teasdale .. .. 11 89 Residential and farmlets .. .. Very good. Te Miro .. • • 30 4 Dairying and grazing . . . . • ■ Fair. TeNgaroa .. .. 2 .. Dairying .. •• ■■ ■ • „ Te Poi .. .. 2 .. „ Good. Waiare .. .. 4 .. ,, ■ • • • ■ • • • >> Waimana .. 18 25 Dairying and mixed farming Very good. Wairakau .. 14 ,, ■ ■ ■ ■ » Walters .. .. 3 ,, ■ ■ ■ ■ >> Waitakaruru .. 15 3 Dairying, grazing ■ • • • •• „ Whatawhata .. 3 .. Dairying .. ■ • • • • ■ Good. Whitehall .. .. 4 15 Dairying and grazing .. •• •• Very good. Totals . . 816 887 Gisborne. Apanui .. .. 7 1 Dairying .. • • • • • • Good. Ardkeen .. .. 15 .. Pastoral .. ■ • ■ • • • » Clydebank .. ■ ■ 3 4 ,, • • ■ • • • • • » Glencoe .. .. 6 .. Dairying Homebush .. . ■ 13 .. ,, • • • • • • • ■ » Hukutaia .. .. 18 3 ,, • • • • • • • • >> Kanakanaia .. .. 7 1 Pastoral .. • • • • • • >> Ngatapa .. • • 25 3 „ • • • • • • •• Ohuka .. .. 11 •• >> •' Fair. Paremata .. .. 7 .. Dairying and pastoral .. .. . • „ Pouparae .. . • 3 6 Agricultural .. . • • • • • Good. Repongaere .. .. 10 2 Dairying and pastoral .. .. •• „ Rere .. • • 2 .. „ • ■ >> Ruangarehu .. .. 2 .. ,, •• » Te Arai .. 47 15 ,, • • • • ' ' Te Wera .. .. •• Pastoral .. •• Fair. Waimarie .. .. 11 6 Dairying and pastoral .. .. . ■ Good. Wharekaka .. .. 13 .. ,, • ■ • • » Wigan .. • • 12 7 ,, ■ • • • • ■ » Willows '.. .. 12 9 ,, •• •• ■ • >. Totals .. 224 57 Hawke's Bay. Argyll .. . • 44 20 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. Very good. Awamate .. .. 6 .. Dairying .. . • • • ■ • Fair. Beattie .. .. 5 .. Pastoral .. • • • • • ■ Good. Clydebank .. .. 13 3 „ • • • • • • » Corby .. • • 4 .. Mixed farming .. • • ■ • ■ • Fair. Coyne .. 1 •• » ■■ ■■ •• >> Crownthorpe .. 18 . . Pastoral .. • • • • • • Uooa. Elsthorpe .. .. 33 18 „ Very good. Forest Gate .. .. 16 13 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. . . Good. Glengarrv . • • • 28 .. Dairying .. .. • ■ ■ • Fair. Gwavas .. .. 10 1 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. . . ,, Hatuma .... 55 26 „ .... Very good. Kumeroa . .. ' •• 14 3 Agricultural, pastoral, and dairying .. ,, Lindsay . • ■ • 57 16 Mixed farming .. . . ■ • ■ • >, Mahora .. .. 20 15 ,, • • • • • • • • >> Manga-a-toro .. 21 7 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. ■ • „ Mangatahi .. .. 20 4 ,, • • • • •' " Marakeke .. .. 17 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. .. Fair. Omana .. . • 9 1 Dairying .. .. • • ■ • Good. Otamauri .. .. 15 2 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. . . ,, Parinui ... .. 3 .. Mixed farming .. . . .. ■ • Fair. Pourerere .. .. 6 1 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. . • Good. Pukahu .. .. 2 .. Fruit Fair.

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Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937—continued.

15

Name of Estate. ! folds' Principal Purpose Jor which Holdings are utilized. Remarks as to Present Position. Hawke's Bay—contd. Raumati .. .. 28 5 Pastoral and dairying .. .. .. Verv fair Raureka .. .. ]o 9 Dairying and fruit-culture.. .. Ver'v cood Rissmgton .. .. 5 .. Pastoral .. " Good Rylands .. . . 5 .. „ " '" p Springhil] 1 :: :: 1? I M0S * iy P ast0ral " " - •• vCygood. Te Kaihi .. .. 3 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. Good Te Kura .. .. 11 .. Dairying ., ,. ,. -p.,;., Te Mata .. ., 12 4] Fruit farming Tongoio .. .. 12 .. Mostly pastoral Tomoana . . .. 4 10 Fruit and dairying .. .. _ Verv pond Waihau .. .. 17 4 Mostly pastoral .. . . .. ,, Good Waipuka .. .. 1 .. Pastoral .. . . .. p a j r Watea .. .. 10 .. Mixed farming Wilder .. .. 4 '' " Woodlands .. .. 8 .. Dairying and Agricultural Miscellaneous .. 3 .. Dwellings .. .. " Totals .. S87 161 Taranaki. Araheke .. .. 3 . . Dairying .. . . .. .. Fai Clandon .. .. 7 t T ' Croydon .. .. 7 "1 " Very good. Hawke .. .. 1 .. ;; ;; •• •• • • Good - S" a a t0ki '• '• 2 l 3 Residential, small' farming.. " " Unsatisfactory. • • • • 6 .. Mixed farming .. .. . . . # J Humga .. .. 8 2 Dairying and mixed farming .. . . Good. Katikara " :: 3 :: S5 rming :: ;; ;; ;; Soof ctory ' Kohura .. .. 11 .. Mixed farming Kota .. .. 7 _ 6 " " •' Mana . . .. 1 .. Grazing .. .. " y'\ Mangamaire 1 ... ci a if?J arco • • • • 2 .. Mixed farming .. . . a ° ° ry ' Ktu e :: -i 1 •• •• ;; :: Okahu .. .. 1 :: Dairying :: ! Unsatisfactory. Parkes .... 7 " .... aLL - Pin 1 . " ' * • • • • • • (jrOOd. Italiii ;; \ ;; .. .. .. .. Unsatisfactory. Ratapiko .. .. 4 ] Dairying and mixed farming .. Good " TaitaZ " '• 2 38 Residential, small farming. .. " Very good. laxtama .. .. (> . Mixed farming G oo'd. -LciiiK.i .. .. 7 i Dairying :: :: I u Sn f r ing :: :: ii Tut.utawa .. .. 3 .. Dairying and grazing .. . . .. Good Totals .. 140 63 Wellington. Akitio Uhe " " " jR ail 7 in g . ■' Pair. tfm'lle " " « ' ' « razm g> shee P. and cattle .. . . Good. Almadale .. .. 8 .. Dairying Lowei . good . upper> Aorangi .. .. 19 23 „ fair (improving). Armstrong " " l " als ° a few sheep.. .! " Very fair to fair. Armstrong .. .. 1 .. Dairying Good Bartholomew'' !'! 6 " " " " " '" ? ood; buildi "gs poor. Benge .. .. i " " Improving. Braemore .. .. 4 Pastoral ' ' ' P 00rBrown .. .. \ D a " G ° od " Bruce .... 1 Bryce .. .. 3 ;; ;; ;; • ■ • • * alr to p° 0r - Callender .. .. 1 .. Dairying, also a few sheep.. . Fa,V ' Carrington .. .. 34 2 Mixed " . . Cherry Grove .. 3 .. Dairying, one section mixed .. . ! Stotions'l;' and 3, great improvement; Section 1, little improveCloverlea .. .. 17 .. Dairying and residential .. .. Good^ 88 '■ '• 1 '• Dairying Good " (owner requires Coyle .. .. 1 .. supervision). Currie .. .. 2 .. " " " " n ° or ' , " • • • • • • • • One good, one fair.

C.—l.

Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937 —continued.

16

I Wr „. , . , „ ... .... i Remarks as to Present Name of Estate. kofds." ! holds'. Principal Purpose for which Holdings are utilized, : Position. ;■ '1 ! — Wettington —continued. ., . , n a Dawbin • • ■ • 1 • ■ Dairying and residential .. ■. ■ • uooa. Devonshire .. • • 1 .. ,, S iX ° n 36 II Mixed " .. •• F air - Eaglesham • 5 .. Dairying and grazing Good g °° d ' Epuni Hamlet .. 15 30 Mixed and garden .. • • • ■ Good. Evans • • • • 1 • ■ Dairying, also a few sheep.. .. • • P alr - Fairfield •• •• 7 1 Dairying .. •• •• •• >> xfollonn . . • • 6 • • Mixed dairying, also a few sheep .. .. Good. .. 1 .. Dairying and residential .. • ■ • • P alr - jjf , I ' ...... Poor. Glasspole .. •• 1 » Pair. Gower ■ • • • V " . • • Medium. Graham .. 1 •• " .. .. Good. Greves° •• 1 •• Dairying, also a few sheep.. .. ■■ Fair Hall Jones .. 11 29 Gardening .. Good. n.mmnnd •• 1 •• Dairying and residential .. ■■ air. Hawtev • -.40 56 Residential Doubtful, little demand. Hardie • • ■ • 1 • • Dairying (reselected May, 1932) . . .. Good progress being ui fid©. Haunui No. 1 • • 7 • • Dairying; one section mixed .. • ■ Very good (mixed neHaunuiNo. 2 ■■ 7 .. Dairying Good g °° d ' Harper •• •• 1 •• « Heatherlea •• 1 Residential .. •• •• Showing up very well. Heretaunga .. •• 12 1 14 Kesiclentiai .. Fair to rioor Heights •• •• 2 .. Sheep and dry cattle Pair to poor. tt-ii .. 1 .. Dairying, also a few sheep.. . . • • f* air. tt i • 7 Mixed .. • • • • • • Fair t0 P oor * Horrobm • • •• 1 •• llxe . ' S+ill imr>rnvinpJohnson •• 1 Grazing Good Kairanga .. H •• Dairying •• Uoocl - Kiwitea • ■ ■ ■ 1 • ■ Dairying and residential Kopane . • • • 14 • • Dairying Kuku • ■ • • 4 .. Mixed Langdalc .. •• 10 15 Grazing Langley-Purdom .. 1 Dairying Lean •< •• 1 Residential Lewis 1 Dairying po ° l - Little 11 :: " 1 " sUp.anddrycaiile i! " " Loughnan " 25 3 pSial !! Very Httle demand at S* 26 „ 7 Dairying' !! " - Makopua .. •• 2 .. Pastoral Improvement this year. Marama-a-mau • • 6 . . Dairying • • • • ■ • • • • Mangawhata . • • • • • 7 >> • • • • " " ™ • ' Marshall . • • • 1 • • >> y '' '' '' " ' p ' Mnunsraraki . . • • I 7 4 Residential .. • • • • • • t?Y l - . Mateikona .. 5 .. Grazing Pair and improving. iViataiKona 01 TioiWiW . .. • ■ One section much imMatamua . • '' Jo • • proved; others poor. Melling • • • ■ 2 .. Residential Proving Moroa .. • • 19 • ■ Dairying Pair and fmproving Motukai . ■ • 3 .. Grazmg . • • • • ■ • • £ alr ana im P r<mn SMuhunoa .. 2 .. Dairying to poor. McDonnell .. 1 •• » ; " G ood. McKenzie • • • • 1 • • » McLean .. • • j • • » -p a j r g 00( j. Nesdale No. 1 ' '' 1 • ■ Dairying and pastoral Pair. Nesdale No. 2 . • 1 • • Dairying Ngahape .. ■ • 6 • • Grazing Good. Ngakaroro .. . ■ 2 . . Dairying . • • • • • • • q 0(k | Ngarara .. • • 5 .. » • ■ '' '' '' p„„_' Normandale .. 21 27 Mixed .. .. •• ■■ Fair Ohakea .. .. 3 14 Dairying ***• Olliver .. • • 2 .. Grazing 01ver ' '' ] ' ' Dairying .. ■ • • ' ;; G ;' od (one sect ion just Omapu .. • • • ■ » • changed ownership). n 2 ....•••■ Pair. 0r ° ua » ... Good. Osborne • . . • • ° • • Otahome .. .. 2 .. Grazmg .. • • • • ■ • p'-ij Oturoa .. • 7 1.. Dairying -tailing.

C.—l.

Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937 —continued.

3 —C. 1.

17

Name of Estate. ; folds' holds Principal Purpose for which Holdings are utilized. Present Wellington—continued. Owenga .. ■ . 18 3 Residential .. . . .. .. Fair. Paa Creek .. .. 1 Dairying, also a few sheep.. .. .. Good. Paparangi .. . • 18 18 Residential .. . . . . .. Fair to poor. Paramu . . . . 1 . . Grazing .. . . . . .. Poor. Perham . . .. 1 • ■ Mixed .. .. .. .. .. Fair. Phillips .. ■ ■ 4 ■ ■ Dairying .. .. .. .. Very good. Pihautea .. . ■ 26 2 ,, .. .. .. .. Good. Pitt . . • - • ■ 5 Gardening .. .. .. .. Fair. Pohehe . . • ■ 1 • ■ Dairying, sheep, and cattle .. .. Good. Poroporo .. .. 16 2 Mixed . . . . . . .. .. Fair. Pukekoa .. . . 9 .. Dairying . . . . . . .. „ Pukenamu and extension 8 .. ,, .. .. . . .. Fair to poor. Puketoi . . . . 8 2 Grazing, sheep, and cattle .. .. Very good. Putorino . . .. 14 .. Dairying .. . . .. Fair. Quillinan .. ■ . 1 • • „ • ■ • • • • • • Good. Raumaewa . . .. 3 . . „ .. .. .. .. Fair. Ruatangata .. . . 3 .. „ .. . ■ .... Good. Sandilands .. .. 1 ■ ■ ,, • • • • • • • • Fair. Saxon .. .. 1 • • „ • • • ■ • • • • Fair to good. Soland . . .. 1 • • „ • • • • • • • • Very good, improving; sheep to cheek ragwort. Stanley .. . . 1 • • „ • • • • • • ■ • Fair, improving. Stokes .. . • 1 • ■ ,, • • ■ • • ■ • • Fair. Tablelands and Hikiwera 12 5 Grazing .. .. .. .. Good. Taikorea . . . . 5 . . Dairying .. .. .. .. 'Fair. Tauherenikau .. 1 • . Mixed .. .. .. . . .. Improving. Taumaihi . . .. 2 1 Residential .. .. .. . . Poor. Tapuae . . •. 2 .. Grazing .. .. .. .. Good. Tawaha . . .. 24 1 Mixed .. .. .. .. .. „ Te Matua . . .. 6 9 Dairying .. .. .. .. „ Te Ore Ore . . .. 8 .. Dairying and mixed farming .. .. Good to fair. Te Whiti . . .. 6 .. Dairying .. . . .. .. Fair. Tikotu .. • . 3 .. ,, .. .. .. .. „ Tiraumea .. ■. 16 .. Grazing .. . • • ■ • * Good to fair. Tupurupuru . . . . 3 . . ,, .. .. . • • • Good. Tuturumuri .. . . 12 . . ,, .. .. .. .. „ Waddington . . . . 13 3 Gardening .. .. .. .. Poor. Wakren ■ • • • 1 • • Dairying .. .. .. .. Fair. Waihora . . .. 3 . . Mixed .. .. .. .. .. Good. Waitawa . . .. 3 . . Dairying .. .. .. .. „ Waterson . . . ■ 2 . . ,, .. .. . • ■ • Fair. Westella . . . . 12 .. ,, .. ■. . ■ • ■ ,, Westmere . . .. 9 . . Mixed .. .. .. .. . . G°°d. White . . • • 1 ■ ■ Dairying .. .. .. • ■ „ Wilford . . . . 64 135 Residential .. .. .. .. „ Woulfe . . .. 1 • • Dairying .. .. .. .. Very good. Wright .. . . 1 • • » • • • • • • • • » Youle .. • • 1 • ■ » • • • • • • • ■ Good. Totals .. 904 340 Nelson. Blue Glen .. .. 1 •. Grazing .. .. .. ■ • Poor. Braeburn .. .. 21 2 Mixed farming .. .. .. • • Good. Glenrae .. . . 1 • • >> • • • • • • • • >> Golden Downs .. 1 • • ,, • • • • • • » Homestead .. .. 1 • • Grazing .. .. .. .. „ Lake .. .. 5 1 „ • ■ • • • • • • Fair. Maruia .. .. 10 .. Grazing and dairying .. .. .. „ Matakitaki .. .. 1 ■ • Grazing Palmer .. .. 1 • • Mixed .. .. . . . ■ .. ,, Spittall .. . . 1 ■ • Dairying Tutaki .. .. 4 1 Grazing .. .. .. . • Poor. Waimaunga . . .. 1 .. Dairying .. .. .. . • „ Walker .. .. 1 .. „ •• Good. Wangapeka . . .. IS 3 Mixed farming Totals .. 64 7 Marlborough. Alberton .. . . 4 . . Agricultural and dairying .. .. . . Poor. Blind River .. .. 18 .. Agricultural and sheep .. .. '.. Very good. Bomford .. .. 1 • • Agricultural .. .. . . .. Poor. Erina .. .. 10 2 Sheep .. .. .. .. ■ • Fair. Fernleigh .. .. 6 .. Dairying Flaxbourne .. .. 3 26 17 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. .. Very good. Goat Hills .. .. 3 .. .Sheep .. . , .. ,, .. Fair.

a—l.

Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937 —continued.

18

1 t poop. TTrpp- . , Vr ,j. i.-T j Remarks as to Present Name of Estate. j holds. Principal Purpose for which Holdings are utilized. Position. Marlborough—continued. Hillersden .. .. 52 8 Sheep . . .. .. ■ • Good. Hillersden Bush 1 ■ • . Linkwaterdale .. 5 .. Agricultural and dairying .. .. . . iair. Lynton Downs .. 11 . . Sheep .. .. • • • • • • >> Moorlands .. .. 6 .. Agricultural Neville .. • ■ 1 1 U • • • • •' " , North Bank . . .. 9 .. Sheep .. .. • • • • • • t*ood. Omaka .. . . 14 .. Agricultural, sheep, and dairying .. ■ . „ Puhi Puhi .. .. 2 .. Sheep Rainford .. • • H ■ • Dairying . . . • • • •• » Richmond Brook .. 12 .. Sheep Very good. Scarborough .. • • 166 28 Agricultural and pastoral .. .. • • » Waipapa .. .. 4 . . Sheep .. .. • • • • • Good. Warnock .. • • 2 .. Dairying .. .. . • Poor. Wither .. .. 17 5 Sheep and poultry .. .. •• lair. Totals .. 481 61 Westland. Kokatahi .. • • 8 .. Dairying and grazing .. ■ • Satisfactory. Poerua .. 23 5 ,, Raupo .. • • 4 .. „ ■ • • • • • » Runanga .. • • 1 • • Residential Totals .. 36 5 d (TY) t PvhlLYf/ Acton .. 6 .. Mixed farming .. .. Pair; holdings too small; land dirty, too much cropping. Albury .. • • 78 3 Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. .. Very good. Allanholme .. • • 10 .. » • • • • Annan .. ■ • 43 5 Mixed farming and grazing .. ■ ■ Well established. Ashley Gorge . . 7 3 Dairy-farming and grazing . . . . Ashton •• 6 .. Mixed farming .. .. Fair; holdings too small; land dirty. Ashwick .. • ■ 8 .. Sheep-farming and grain-growing . . . . Fair. Avenel .. .. 17 .. Mixed farming .. . . .. ■■ Satisfactory. Avenel Extension . . 12 .. „ Generally satisfactory. Avonhead . . .. 18 1 Small farming .. .. ■ • • ■ Still uncertain. Avonhead No. 2 . . J 7 1 ,, • - ■ • • • • ■ » Aylesbury .. •. 6 .. Mixed farming .. .. . . ■ • t*ood. Bankfield .. 9 •• Mixed farming and grain-growing .. .. ['air. Beach .. .. 10 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. Fair; holdings too small. Bourndale .. •• 10 .. Mixed farming and grain-growing .. .. Fair Braco .. .. 2 12 Market-gardening .. •• Vr ell established. Brinklands .. ■ • • . 2 Dairying and mixed farming .. .. Under manager. Broadfields .. .. 4 .. Mixed grain-growing .. .. •• Still uncertain. Brooksdale .. .. 14 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. Uncertain; holdings too small. Bruce .. .. 4 .. „ Pair. Buckley .. ■ • 3 .. „ ■ • • • • • » Buddo" .. .. 9 6 Workers' dwellings .. .. .. i », Burke's Homestead .. 1 .. Homestead site .. .. • ■ • • Chamberlain .. 19 2 Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. .. -fcair Clandeboye .. .. 11 •• Dairy-farming and gram-growing .. .. Very fair. Clandeboye No. 2 6 » . • • 5 a ""' , , . Claremont .. .. 11 •• Sheep-farming and gram-growing .. .. Boor to fair. Clayton .. ■ • 6 » ■ • • • 0 . . . , , dunes ... .. 8 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. ■ • Fair; cropping instead of dairying. Coldstream .. .. 10 .. Mixed farming and grain-growing .. .. Fair; holdings too small. Cooper's Creek .. 1 .. Sheep-farming .. .. .. • ■ Fair. Copland .. .. 2 .. Sheep, dairying, and grain-growing . . „ Craigmore . . • ■ 9 . . Mixed farming .. .. ■ • • ■ Poor to fair. Cricklewood .. .. 11 • • » • • • • • ■ " Culverden .. .. 53 18 Mixed farming and grazing .. l*ood. Douglas . .. 36 .. Mixed farming and grain-growing .. . . Fair. Doyleston . . .. 5 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. ■ ■ Uncertain yet. Drayton .. -. 14 6 Agricultural .. .. •• Dromore . . • • 2 . . Mixed farming and grazing .. .. Uncertain; holdings too small. Eccleston .. . . 4 .. Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. . . Good. Epworth .. . ■ • • 2 Now freehold .. .. .. ■ ■ _• • Finlay Downs .. 4 .. Mixed farming and gram-growmg .. . . ! oor to fair. Four Peaks .. .. 8 .. Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. . . Good. jyrie ■ .. . . 4 1 Mixed farming .. . . ■ . . . Not satisfactory. Glenmark . . .. 27 3 Mixed farming and grazing .. ■ Good. Glentanner .. ., .. • • Homestead-site , . •. .. . • Pair,

C.—l.

Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937—continued.

19

Name of Estate. e d e s " : Principal Purpose for which Holdings are utilized. | Remarksjis to Preaent _i j Canterbury—continued. Gorge Road . . .. 4 17 Worker's home . . Grange .. .. 3 I Dairying and grain-growing . . Pair; holdings too TT „ small. Hadlow .. .. 1 . . Mixed farming . . . . . . .. Fair. Hawthorne . . . . 9 .. „ . . . . .. _ Satisfactory; holdings „ . too small. Hei Hei .. .. ]2 4 Poultry-farming, &c. .. .. .. "Uncertain yet. Hekeao .. .. 10 7 Mixed farming . . . . .. ,. Satisfactory. Hewitt .. .. 1 .. Homestead-site .. Highbank .. .. 69 13 Mixed farming . . . . . . . . Good. Hillboro .. .. 3 .. Mixed farming and grain-growing .. . . Poor to fair. Homebrook . . . . 15 . . Mixed farming .. .. .. .. Good. Hornby .. .. 17 6 Agricultural and gardening . . . . Fair. Horsley Downs .. 7 23 Mixed farming .. .. .. .. Well established. Isleworth .. .. 18 . . Mixed grain-growing .. .. .. Uncertain. ■Jungle .. . . 2 .. Dairy-farming .. .. .. . . Fair. Kaimahi .. . . 4 9 „ . . . . .. .. Satisfactory. Kakahu . . .. 5 . . Workers' homes and gardening . . . . Poor to fair. Kapua .. . . 12 . . Mixed farming and grazing .. .. Good. Kapuatohe . . . . 5 9 Market-gardening and dairying . . . . ,, Keith . . . . .. 1 Workers' homes and gardening .. .. Satisfactory. Kereta .. .. 4 , . Mixed farming .. .. .. . . Good. Kinloch .. . . 30 2 Dairying and sheep-grazing .. .. Well established. kohika. .. .. 16 .. Mixed farming and grazing .. .. Good. Kohika No. 2 .. 4 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. .. Poor to fail'. Kowhatu .. .. 5 . . „ .. . . .. Pair Ladbrooks . . . . 14 .. ,, Lambrook . . . , 6 .. ,, Lansdown . . .. 10 1 Mixed farming and grain-growing Lauriston .. .. 4 1 Mixed grain-growing .. . . .. Fair; too much eropping. Leeston . . .. 5 1 Agricultural .. . . .. .. Well established. Lees Valley . . .. 8 .. Sheep-farming . . .. .. .. Position difficult; imt it proving. Lyndhurst . . .. 18 . . Mixed farming .. .. .. .. Satisfactory. Lyndon • • • • 7 1 „ . . .. .. Well established. Lyndon No. 2 . . 9 . . Mixed farming and grazing Macgregor .. . . .1 .. „ .. .. .. Very poor. Marawiti . . 12 1 „ G ood. May town . . .. 8 3 Mixed farming and dairying .. .. „ Mead . . .. 21 1 Mixed farming and grazing .. . . Well established. Meadows .. .. 14 .. Mixed farming and grain-growing .. . . Fair Milford .. .. 4 . . Mixed farming Mills .. . . 21 . . Mixed farming and dairying .. .. Fair to good. Moanaroa . . .. 3 .. Mixed farming . . .. . . .. Fair, improving. Morice .. .. 28 3 Dairying and grass-seed growing . . .. Satisfactory. Morten . . . . 17 1 Poultry, &c. . . .. . . .. Uncertain yet. Montford .. .. 7 . . Mixed farming and grazing . . . . Improving. Mount Nessing .. 11 .. Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. .. Fair. New Park .. .. 7 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. .. Fair; holdings too small. Uakwood . . .. 5 .. Mixed farming and grain-growing .. .. Fair. Ohapi . . .. 6 .. Mixed farming .. . . .. .. Good. Omihi .. .. .. .. Homestead-site Orakipaoa .. .. 26 1 Market-gardening .. .. .. tī Otaio . . .. 9 . . Mixed farming . . .. . . .. " t Otarakaro .. .. . . 7 Small farming and dairying .. . . Well established. Papaka .. ., 9 .. Market-gardening . . .. .. Good. Pareora . . .. 26 2 Mixed farming Pareora No. 2 .. 26 7 „ Patoa .. . . 1 3 Grazing and small farming .. .. Satisfactory. Pawaho .. . . 7 18 Market-gardening . . .. .. Peaks .. .. 9 3 Mixed farming .. . . .. .. " Puhuka . . .. 9 1 Workers' homes Punaroa .. .. 15 2 Dairying, sheep-farming, and grain-growing .. Good. Raincliff .. .. 1 .. Sheep-farming .. .. .. .. Fair. Rakitairi .. .. 20 2 Mixed farming and grain-growing .. .. Fair to crood. Rapuwai . . .. 5 . . „ .. .. p a i r . Rautawiri .. .. 6 .. Mixed farming, grain - growing, and small Good. farming Riverina .. .. 3 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. .. Fair; holdings too small. Roimata . . .. 7 22 Workers' homes Rosebrook .. .. 11 3 Small farming and dairying .. .. Fair to good. Rosewill .. . . 151 11 Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. .. Good. Ruapuna No. 2 .. 15 .. Mixed farming .. . . .. .. Satisfactory. Scargill .. .. 9 .. Mixed farming and grazing .. .. Scotston .. .. 2 .. Mixed farming .. .. .. . . Fair; improving. Seafield .. .. 6 .. ,, .. .. .. .. Fair; holdings too small. Seaforth . . .. 7 . . Small farming and dairying .. . . Fair.

C.—l.

Summary of the Settlements established upon Estates acquired and dealt with under the Provisions of the Land for Settlements Act up to the 31st March, 1937 continued.

20

Name of Estate. J jSjggt; ! ifofds". j Prmeipal Purpose for which Holdings are utilized. j Sh^wd«0TOB tU1Ued ' 29 1 Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. .. Poor to fair o„ r ;„„ w „ll 6 .. Mixed farming and gram-growing .. .. *air to good. Stoke" ' 7 Mixed farming Good. Studhdmc Junction ' 4 .. Small farming and dairying .. .. Good. Talritu 5 ■ ■ Sheep-farming .. . • • ■ • • » Taniai '' ■ • 8 33 Workers' homes .. .. • ■ • • Satisfactory. T ' 9 1 Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. . ■ Good. Tnrnwnhi " - 3 25 Workers' homes .. .. • • • • Satisfactory. 'Teschemaker .. 14 .. Mixed farming and grain-growing .. .. Poor to fair Timaunga .. •• 16 •• Mixed farming •• Pair to good. Timaunga Extension .. V • • ' V> ' + t :, T • 25 Sheep-farming and gram-growing .. .. roortotan. Valverde !! !. 10 .. Mixed farming .. Holdings too small, land Waiapi . . .. 11 4 Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. ■ • Good. 34 .. Sheep-farming, fruit, and grain-growing . . Poor to fair. " :: 7 .. T WnitrAi Peaks . 8 • • Sheep-farming .. • • • • • ■ Improving. Welburn .. • • 6 • ■ Mixed farming and dairying .. • ■ Uncertain. Wharenui 11 14 Workers'homes .. •• •• •• W ell established. Winchester '' .. 10 .. Sheep-farming and grain-growing .. .. Pair. Woodlau . . • • 4 . . Mixed farming and grazing . ■ • • Uncertain yet. Totals •• 1,845 353 Otago. r i Airedale .. • • 10 1 Dairying and general .. •• • • Ardgowan . . • • 66 6 ,, • • ■ • • • " » k m i vpfi ., . . ■ • r an • Arnmore • • • • 0 • • „ . •" rWri Arthurton .. • • 4 .. Grazing • • oofl - Aviemore • • • • 1 • • », Awamoa . • ■ • 1 1 Mixed . . • • Barnego .. • ■ 20 4 Dairying and general ,, Bellamy .. 13 Grazing .. Poor. Olareview .. • • 5 .. Dairying and general .. • • • ■ Orood. Clifton ■ • 8 ■ • General . ■ • • • ■ ■ • Fair. Conical Hills .. 45 2 Grazing and general Poor. Crosshill ... •• ■' 1 Mixed Croucher .. 1 " Fair _ " almam ' ' '' ' ' Sixed Good. Downs .. • ■ 8 • • , lxe '' p„„,, Duncan .. •• 4 5 Dairying £oor. Earnscleugli . • • • * rult '' "' *' '' ' ' p nrv H Elderslie No. 1 34 3 General £>ofl Elderslie No. 2 . .. 16 >. ■■ " " " » ■ - Galloway .. •• H 1 Fruit and homestead-sites .. •• Veryiair. Gladbrook '' '' 46 3 Dairying FairGlean .. •• 4 .. Mixed •• " Greenfield .. 36 7 „ • • • • • ■ • • 00ct - Hilderthorpe .. 19 .. General and workers' homes .. .. Pair Hydg , .. 2 4 Mixed and general . . • • • • i*ooa. Janefield !! 19 3 Dairying and fruit Kauroo Hills • • 42 3 General Kelso .. •• 3 .. Dairying .. Onlv fair Kurow .. ■■ 11 3 Dairying and general .. •• •• Unlytau. Lakeview .. .. 1 • • General .. ■ • • ■ • • " ooct - Maerewhenua .. 77 1 „ • • • ■ • • '' ' Makaraeo .. • • 3/ 1 >> • • Poor Makaraeo Extension .. 3 .. f„;, Manuherikia .. .. 9 .. Genera, with irrigation Veryiau. Maraeweka .. .. 8 .. General . • • • • • • • »> SadoXnk:: :: A :: gT." :: :: :: g00d - Sr.. :: I 9 S andm " :: :: ■ ||W Murray field .. •• 2 .. Mixed .. •• •• Onlv fair. Oakleigh .. • • 1 • • »» . • * "' i Otanomomo . . .. 25 1 Dairying £ooa. Otekaike . • ■ • 64 1 Mixed .. .. • • • • • • • Pomahaka " 24 t V. Very fair. Poplar Grove 21 2 Dairying Pukeawa .. .. 14 2 Mixed Good. Pukenui .. •• 6 .. _ ,, ■ ■ Puketapu .. ■ • 6 5 Dairying > Rorkford • • 4 • • JVIixed • • Rosebery .. .. 15 • • Grazing and general >, Rugged Ridges .. 1 Grazing Very tair.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/parliamentary/AJHR1937-I.2.2.2.1

Bibliographic details

C-01 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEY. SETTLEMENT OF CROWN LANDS (ANNUAL REPORT ON)., Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives, 1 January 1937

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10,664

C-01 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEY. SETTLEMENT OF CROWN LANDS (ANNUAL REPORT ON). Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives, 1 January 1937

Working