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Pages 1 to 20

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Pages 1 to 20

E.—9

Sbss. 11.—1897. NEW ZEALAND.

EDUCATION: REPORTS OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS. [In continuation of E.-9, 1896.]

Presented to both Rouses of by Command of His Excellency.

SECONDARY SCHOOLS INCORPORATED OR ENDOWED.

SUMMARY OF THE ACCOUNTS OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURE FOR 1896 FURNISHED BY THE GOVERNING BODIES OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS.

£75,823 0 8

£75,823 0 8

I—E. 9.

Act o{ Incorporation or Institution. :emarl ;s. Name. Auckland College and Grammar School .. 1877, No. 51, Local Auckland Girls' High School .. • • 1878, No. oo, -Local .. Under management of Education Board. Not in operation in 1896. Thames High School .. .. •• 1878, No. M, Local. Whangarei High School 1878, No. 63, Local .. Act may be repealed by Gazette notice under Act of 1885, No. 30. New Plymouth High School .. •• 1889, No. 2 Local. Wanganui Girls' High School .. .. 1878 No. 42, Local .. Wanganui Collegiate School .. ■• U J Board identical with Education Board. Endowment, Beg. I., Jol. 52. See also D.-lb, 1866, p. 9. Wellington College and Girls' High School 1887 No 17 Local. Napier High Schools .. • • ■ • }™> £"• V , G,f rne High School .. • ■ 88 ; No 8 local. Nelson Colleges ., •■ > No. 15, Local Greymouth High School.. • • 1883, No 21 Local .. Christchurch Boys' High School .. .. 1878 No. 30, Local .. Christchurch Girls' High School .. .. [HllJ Ran g ioraHi,hScho ol .. .. 1881 No. 15 Local. Akaroa High School .. • • • ■ > ' T j Ashburton High School .. • • 187|, No 49 Local. Timaru High School .. • • • • f °' °- • L j Waimate High School 1883, No. 1 J, Loca .. Not in operation in 1896. Not in operation in 1896. A department of Christ's College, Canterbury. Under management of Canterbury College Undor management of Canterbury College, Endowment, Gazette, 1878, Vol. 1, p. 181. Not in operation in 1896.

Receipts. To Credit balances on 1st January, 1896 .. Endowment reserves sold Rents of reserves Interest on investments Reserves Commissioners School fees.. Boarding-school foes . • ■ • • Books, &c, sold, and refunds Sundries not classified Interest on Current Account Debit balances, 31st December, 1896 .. £ s. d. 11,191 7 6 1,829 7 2 22,275 3 9 1,898 17 3 2,760 13 1 22,450 18 5 3,599 7 9 377 18 10 2,327 2 5 123 6 9 6,988 17 9 Expenditure. By Liabilities on 1st January, 1896 Office management and expenses Teachers' salaries Boarding-school accounts Examination fees and expenses Scholarships and prizes Printing, stationery, and advertising .. Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. Buildings, furniture, rent, insurance, rates, &c. Interest Sundries not classified .. Credit balances, 31st December, 189b.. £ s. a. 8,646 14 11 2,505 14 4 30,912 12 7 3,460 2 7 435 6 0 2,401 11 10 1,518 3 1 1,390 11 11 7,431 11 8 1,967 16 2 3,113 10 10 12,039 4 9

E.—9

2

Income of certain Secondary Schools for the Year 1896.

From Endowments. Schools. Cr. Balances on 1st Jan., 1896. Boardingschool Fees. Stationery and Books sold, and Refunds. Interest on Current Account. Sales. Rents. Interest on Moneys invested. Paid by School Commissioners. School Fees. Sundries unclassified. Dr. Balances, 31st Dec, 1896. Totals. Auckland College and Grammar School Auckland Girls' High School Thames High School Whangarci High School New Plymouth High School Wanganui (Girls') High School Wanganui Collegiate School Wellington College and Girls' High School Napier High Schools Gisborne High School \ [ Nelson College Greymouth High School Hokitika High School . \ Christchurch Boys' High School Christchurch Girls' High School !" Christ's College Grammar School Eangiora High School Akaroa High School Ashburton High School Timaru High School Waimate High School Waitaki High School .' '. Otago High Schools Southland High Schools £ s. d. 234 11 6 • I £ s. d. > 23 0 0 £ s. d. ) 3,189 1 0 £ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d. 3,195 5 8 £ s. d. I 41 13 4 150 0 0 150 0 0 248 6 8 189 1 2 ' £ s. d. £ s. d. §1,000 0 0 £ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d. 7,641 18 2 41 13 4 898 12 1 507 14 3 1,166 6 5 3,959 5 9 918 13 5 7,820 8 11 117 ]7 3 113 9 8 775 13 1 51 14 0 r I I 508 16 9 55 4 6 449 16 1 248 10 0 836 9 8 1,771 2 2 • • I ,. 303 14 6 239 10 4 84 0 0 354 14 0 1,158 0 4 I - ■• I •■ - I I 0 5 0 "100 0 0 0 12 6 1,229 0 8 55 0 0 I 162 0 0 30° 9 9 10 9 6 62 12 2 4,198 11 2 1.615 - 8 11 1,566 10 3 646 3 11 1,096 12 6 86 17 i 1,178 7 6 161 17 6 106 5 0 481 14 3 34 0 0 37 0 0 481 4 6 356 14 3 300 0 0 60 0 0 60 0 0 929 12 3 2 2 0 2,014 12 11 89 9 10 40 0 0 1,91218 1 113418 9 11 "7 5 4,325 6 10 1,334 3 8 5,927 12 9 457 5 10 1,144 9 0 5,221 15 4 3,395 8 10 8,392 0 6 417 0 9 364 13 4 867 7 1 3,400 8 3 1,801 16 9 2,245 17 2 9,234 4 0 4,339 3 3 168 5 10 992 9 0 32 13 9 1,167 14 11 •• 45 0 0 3,084 5 2 304 13 4 2,670 8 1 279 12 0 119 0 2 618 12 8 1,296 2 10 192 0 8 I 1,351 12 1 2,187 2 1 705 17 2 195 0 0 10 0 0 12 11 8 86 7 2 117' 6 2 •• 1,700 0 0 269 16 5 2,058 10 6 1,517 5 0 1,966 1 6 137 8 9 125 19 0 193 10 9 582 15 4 0"7 9 49 12 0 45 18 8 33 6 6 2,009 12 3 405 15 9 1,553 12 1 427 17 10 2 10 0 2"s 0 - 66"7 2 115 14 4 56 4 0 30 4 9 73 8 6 66 18 0 58 6 8 434 5 5 168 8 11 1 311 8 8 2,803 3 7 578 6 8 • - ji.ooo" 0 0 - 52 13 8 " 2,819 12 6 457' 3 0 15 0 3,27716 5| Totals 11,191 7 6 ] 1,829 7 2 i 22,275 3 9 1,898 17 3 ! 2,760 13 1 22,450 18 5 • • 3,599 7 9 377 18 10 2,327 2 5 75,823 0 8 123 6 9 6,988 17 9 * Parliamentary vote. t Received from insurance company. ! I J Mortgage paid off. § Loan.

3

E.—9

Expenditure of certain Secondary Schools for the Year 1896.

Schools. Liabilities on 1st Jan., 1896. Expense of Boards' Management: Office and Salaries. School Salaries. Boarding- Examiners' school *?, e , s Acc °™ t- Expanses, j Scholarships, Exhibitions, Prizes. Printing, Stationery, Advertising, Land, Buildings, Furniture, Insurance, Eent, Bates. Cleaning, Fuel, Light, &c. Interest. Sundries unclassified. Cr. Balances, 31st Dec, 1896. Totals. Auckland College and Grammar School Auckland Girls' High School Thames High School Whangarei High School New Plymouth High School Wanganui (Girls') High School Wanganui Collegiate School Wellington College and Girls' High School Napier High Schools Gisborne High School Nelson College Greymouth High School Hokitika High School Christchurch Boys' High School Christchurch Girls' High School Christ's College Grammar School Eangiora High School Akaroa High School Ashburton High School Timaru High School Waimate High School Waitaki High School Otago High Schools Southland High Schools £ s. d. 5l" 2 1 £ s. a. 364 15 7 . 54 3 0 8 17 4 26 10 3 90 4 11 78 14 6 1 195 0 0 £ s. a. 3,890 15 10 500 0 0 176 14 0 778 3 0 1,152 2 0 £ s. a. 1 1 £ s. a. • • I 3918 0 15 0 0 £ s. a. 64 18 8 2 13 6 20 9 6 £ s. a. 231 15 10 3e' f 6 11 25 16 10 £ s. a. 1,682 6 0 41 13 4 30 13 7 239 5 6 133 0 5 243 13 8 496 15 7 1,181 4 0 £ s. a. 67 9 0 24"8 4 56 2 1 46 16 0 £ s. a. 242 10 0 4 0 6! £ s. a. 470 8 7 24 13 6 125 18 3 11 2 4 2 16 0 £ s. a. 626 18 8 194 17 8 80 3 11 61 12 101 1,029 18 5 222 1 10: £ s. a. 7,641 18 2 41 13 4 898 12 1 507 14 3 1,166 6 5 3,959 5 9 918 13 5 7,820 3 11 il,237 13 0 7 10 6 223 14 3 i 17 19 6 102 8 8 794 8 0 1,726' 0 10 *3,274" 2 6 8912 0 182 16 11 156 9 5 "" 79 0 11 1,762 7 0 18 15 0 242 11 4 144 0 6 384 12 0 103 0 5 703 17 11 255 14 0 553 7 11 8 6 3 103 13 6 306 16 5 109 18 11 338 16 4 37 17 8 36 0 0 20 14 0 224 7 11 124 16 3 0 4 0 tl,101 16 0 425 0 0 110 2 10 +60 0 0 J72 10 0 128 1 1 65 13 10 103 14 6 2 0 0 188 18 0 509 9 2: 74 2 0 §383 19 7 962 19 0 4,325 6 10 1,334 3 8 5,927 12 9 457 5 10 1,144 9 0 5,221 15 4 3,395 8 10 8,392 0 6 417 0 9 364 13 4 867 7 1 3,400 8 3 1,801 16 9 2,245 17 2 9,234 4 0 4,339 3 3 588 3 7 5 0 0 5 5 0 255 0 10 70 9 2 191 8 7 2,042' 4 2 1,663 "6 0 63 6 0 239 "l 4 99 "6 11 110 0 0 3,885 0 0 1,546 9 4 2,923 0 10 213 6 8 207 17 6 567 1 8 1,576 3 4 88 17 0 60 13 11 56 1 1 78 19 6 266 6 0 835 19 3 163 11 6 9a 17 8 72 12 2 2 13 10 7 13 0 26 11 2 70 11 9 3 7 0 19 19 3 108 18 6 82 1 2 65 9 0 28 4 5 212 19 7 12 5 0 7 17 4 32 16 11 99 14 0 0 16 250 0 0 3,528' 7 2 6 15 4 129*1 0 1,15413 7 3 14 6 31 4 0 135 1 5 18 3 6 81 4 9 148 12 6 75 0 0 ■• 2 6 6 13 1 6 52 0 0 35 13 0 0 10 7 12 6 142 - 2 3 99 3 6 167 9 10 0 15 6 21 17 3 ||261 4 3 49 6 1 47 10 2 29 0 8 •• 3 "3 0 1,220 12 7; 1,480 6 0! 800 7 5 1 3,169 19 8 1,045 14 0 4,182 13 9 1,188 17 0 556 19 2 2 4 5 57 "2 7 17 11 1 126 14 9 494 18 6 62 5 6 60 6 8 220 3 11 75 7 1 62"4 3 247 5 3 2,806 16 4| Totals .. 8,646 14 11! 2,505 14 4 30,912 12 7; 3,460 2 7 435 6 0 ,2,401 1 10 1,518 3 1 7,432 1 8 1,390 11 11 1,967 16 2 3,113 10 10 12,039 4 9|75,823 0 8 • Including £106 12s. 6d. paid to Technical School. t lucli iSes £1,100 investment. t Grant to Education Board. § Excluding money on loan. ]| To Education Board, £209 5s.; lor pupils' fees, £51

8.—9

4

Staff, Attendance, Fees, and Salaries at Secondary Schools.

EEPOKTS OF SECONDAEY SCHOOLS.

AUCKLAND COLLEGE AND GEAMMAE SCHOOL. 1. —Eepokt op the Boabd. Distinctions. —The school gained five of the fifteen junior scholarships offered by the University of New Zealand in 1895, and the other five candidates sent up for this examination passed with credit. Fifteen also passed the ordinary examination for matriculation, and one the medical preliminary. Three cadetships have been awarded to pupils of the girls' side on the result of the last Junior Civil Service Examination. Of former pupils, Mr. W. J. Barclay gained the Vans Dunlop Scholarship at Edinburgh for anatomy and physiology; at Cambridge, Mr. W. S. LaTrobe was placed in the Mechanical Science Tripos, Part I.; Mr. B. N. Tebbs, in the first class of the Natural Science Tripos, Part II.; and Mr. E. C. Maclaurin, in the first class of the Mathematical Tripos, Part 11.

Schools. Stal II s t> M Attendi mce fi Juartt m- Lai irof 1 3t Tei .896. or ll II i i o K o 01 p. § Annual Bates of Fees. Salaries at R; End of ites paid at year. % be I 2 X I US Sit i! $3 For Ordinary Day-school Course. For Board, exclusive of Day-school Tuition. liegular Staff. Visiting Teachers. Auckland College and Grammar School 15 21 155 198 16208 Iff 173 (6.13 (£7- 9 (6.16 (17-12 (6.28 1(7.34 I 361 I » t 26 £ s. d. j 10 10 0 (880 £ s. d. I - £ s. d. 3,531 0 0 £ s. d. 140 0 0 Whangarei High School 1 3 10 9 8 8 0 176 14 0 Thames High School 14 14 (880 "(770 I I "500 0 0 New Plymouth High ) School } Wanganui Endowed ) School Wanganui (Girls') High ) School J 4 11 18 56 39 101 1 176 174 135 6 6 0 ( 12 12 0 (990 ] 10 10 0 (880 f 13 i 0 1 10 12 0 ( 13 i 0 \ 10 12 0 j 9 9 0 (880 I 45 0 0 I- 40 0 0 I 42 0 0 ) - I 40 0 0 "790 0 0 >> l, 600 o a 8 19 42 8 77 73 30 =700 0 0 (225 0 0 land fees. Wellington College I'J 69: 140 17 245 231 59 "2,025 0 0 Wellington Girls' High ) School J Napier Boys' High School 8 20 94 5 127 116 1,175 0 0 7 14 30 51 50 16 11 800 0 0 Napier Girls' High School 14 32 16 2 64 59 10 9 9 0 40 0 0 '•740 0 0 156 0 0 Nelson College 6 20 59 6| 91 89 25 12 12 0 40 0 0 =1,250 0 0 Nelson Girls' College .. 21 50 9 85 71 23 12 12 0 40 0 0 = 625 0 0 Christ's College Gram- ] mar School Christchurch Boys'High ) School Christchurch Girls' High I School Rangiora High School .. Akaroa High School Ashburton High School.. 11 7 21 17 s 4 ] 61 119 48 16 5 25 j 48 110 58 3 9 16 9 13 5 1 142 259 119 (6.17 (0- 5 (6.10 \g- * 16.28 l<7.15 6.43 \gA6 136 251 112 I 22 } .. I „ I 87 33 1 lit 3 C 11 0 6 I 7 17 6 (990 (660 ( 12 12 0 (990 19 9 0 (660 j 9 9 0 (880 (990 (770 J 10 0 0 18 0 0 J "10 10 0 (880 ('800 (600 10 0 0 { or less j 10 0 0 14 0 0 ) 52 10 0 j 42 0 0 I - I 40 0 0 I •■ ) I 43 10 0 I 40 0 0 |«2,425 0 0 3,425 0 0 1,180 0 0 d 213 6 8 200 0 0 550 0 0 244 17 6 285 0 0 262 16 0 Timaru High School Waitaki High Schools — Boys' 44 40 1,526 0 0 50 0 0 4 31 35 34 5 d 740 0 0 12 0 0 Girls' 10 23 3 42 40 410 0 0 Otago Boys' High School '3 1 62 135 6 204 191 12 »2,297 14 0 297 i 0 Otago Girls' High School U 42 77 20 144 132 11 el,362 10 0 262 16 0 Southland High School.. 5 31 55 (6.57 l<7.35 J- 89 3 10 0 0 (35 0 0 1 30 0 0 J* 1,165 0 0 25 4 0 Totals 132 168 920 49 ,1397 129 61023 gr 991 2,473 363 29,407 i 8 1960 17 6 a Residence for Head, a Headmaster {or mistress) 1 teach in both schools. I Hi i £4 10s. for public-school pui »Ei las Badi >ils £ Mil hot nist mast< ise a] ;ress ; yeStt iv re( id bi ind a mdai :eives jnothe :dIV. no sa fs. ir resi ,lary; si o'Hes ide at si 3ven mi xlmastc ;hool. isters sr am li J i reside at th< 1 five others ■A 10s. or £3 f< I school, have houses >r public-schi c Principal resid i. f Two visil ool pupils abovo leg at school, tins masters Standard V

5

E.—9

Staff. —The following additions to the staff have been made during the year : Mr. P. Marshall, M.A., B.Sc, F.G.S., formerly senior scholar of the University of New Zealand, Science master; Mr. James Hight, M.A., formerly senior scholar of the University of New Zealand, French and German master; Miss W. Picken, M.A., formerly junior scholar of the University of New Zealand, assistant mistress ; Mr. H. J. D. Mahon, 8.A., of the University of New Zealand, English and commercial master ; Mr. Thomas Dunn, 8.A., formerly junior and senior Education Board scholar, and New Zealand University junior scholar, junior master. Two valued members of the staff died during the year—viz., Mr. E. E. Watkins, who for twelve years held the office of French and German master, and Mr. Owen Ilbert, M.A., for three years and a half chief classical and English master. Boll. —The number of pupils on the roll for the last term of 1896 was 381—viz., 208 boys and 173 girls. Endowments. —The endowments which were set apart for the Auckland Girls' High School remain unutilised; and, at the same time, the wants of this school, caused by the opening of the girls' department, are urgent. When the Girls' High School was closed by the Board of Education and taken over by the Board of Governors of the Auckland College and Grammar School, a portion of this building and of the playground, which had been designed exclusively for boys, was appropriated to the school for girls; and this arrangement, which was intended to be temporary, has now been in operation for more than eight years. The present accommodation in both departments is barely adequate. G. Maueice O'Eokke, Chairman.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 234 11 6 By Management— Ground-rents .. .. .. 1,947 12 6 Office salary .. .. .. 100 0 0 Weekly rencs .. .. .. 1,241 8 6 Other office expenses .. .. 54 10 2 School fees .. .. .. .. 3,195 5 8 Commission, &c, to collector .. 210 5 5 Contractors'deposits.. .. .. 15 0 0 Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 3,890 15 10 Sale of old buildings .. .. .. 23 0 0 School requisites .. .. .. 139 15 6 Loan from Diocesan Pension Board .. 1,000 0 0 Election expenses .. .. .. 3 410 Legal expenses .. .. .. 35 8 9 Scholarship expenses .. .. 9 10 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 55 8 8 Printing and advertising .. .. 106 6 6 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c.— School .. .. .. .. 4G 15 3 Property .. .. .. .. 20 13 9 Book and stationery account, and other temporary advances .. ~ 125 9 4 Fencing, repairs, &c.— School .. .. .. .. 215 11 9 Property .. .. .. .. 572 110 Insurance and taxes— School .. .. .. .. 37 12 0 Property .. .. .. .. 207 0 5 Interest on loans .. .. .. 242 10 0 Compensation .. .. .. 272 1C 6 Contribution to swimming sports .. 3 3 0 „ domain wicket .. 6 0 0 athletic sports .. 10 0 0 New buildings .. .. ... 650 0 0 Contractors' deposits refunded .. 15 0 0 Balance at end of year .. .. 626 18 8 £7,656 18 2 £7,656 18 2

W. Wallace Kidd, Secretary. Examined and found correct, with the following exceptions : (1) That the loan of £1,000 for the purpose of building cottages at Devonport has been raised without the authority of law; (2) that the payment of £84 to a member of the Board for his services as teacher under the Board is unlawful, and must be refunded.— J. K. Waebueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

3. Work of the Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest.—Boys: Latin, mathematics, English, French, chemistry, electricity, and magnetism, as for University Junior Scholarships. Girls: The same, with the substitution of heat and botany for chemistry and electricity, and with the addition of drawing and painting. German is taught on both sides as an optional extra subject. Lowest. — Boys : Latin—Elementa Latina (Morris). French—Chardenal's First Course. English—Mason's First Notions of Grammar, with easy parsing and analysis; reading and repetition from Longmans' Fifth Eeader and Evangeline; Longmans' Historical Eeader. Geography—Longmans' Shilling. English composition. Arithmetic—Longmans' Shilling, as far as vulgar fractions, inclusive. Girls : Same as boys, except that Latin is not taught. 4. SCHOLAESHIPS. The College gave free education to twenty foundation scholars, twenty holders of certificates of proficiency from the Education Board, six children of members of the teaching staff, and one Maori scholar. Seven Eawlings, seven Williamson, and sixty-five Education Board scholarships were held at the College.

6

8.—9

AUCKLAND GIBLS' HIGH SCHOOL. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Endowments, paid by School Commis- By Bates on endowments, for year ending sioners .. .. .. 41 13 4 31st March, 1897 .. .. .. 41 13 4 £41 13 4 £41 13 4 James Muib, Chairman. Vincent E. Eice, Secretary and Treasurer. Examined and found correct. — J. K. Warbueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

WHANGAEEI HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Eeport of the Board. Sir,— Whangarei, 30th March, 1897. I have the honour, by direction of the Whangarei High School Board, to submit to you the following report for the year ended 31st December, 1896 : — During the year Mr. E. D. Duxfield, M.A., resigned the principalship, and Mr. Eoger Lupton (London University) was appointed in his place. Mr. Lupton has succeeded admirably in building up the school, the number on the roll for last term was 22 ; average attendance, 18 : under twelve, 3 ; between twelve and fifteen, 10; between fifteen and eighteen, 9. Mr. Duxfield received as salary £55 2s. for first term, and his successor £121 125., for last two terms of the year. The annual fee for the ordinary course of instruction was £8 Bs. The work done in the highest form was that required for Matriculation and Civil Service Examinations. In the lowest form : Latin —Principia Latina, Part I. to XXXIX. ; Fxench— Chardenal's First Course, to exercise 93; Euclid—l., 1 to 26; algebra—elementary rules; arithmetic—simple and compound rules; English grammar—Trotter; history—Brief; geography (general) —Longmans'. Beading—Eoyal, IV ; composition, spelling, and drawing. Whole school: gymnastics. During the year the Board founded two scholarships, tenable for three years, at the discretion of the Board—which were won by Catherine Kinross Kerr, of Otonga public school, and John Dunsmuir of Kamo public school. Several parents residing in the country districts around have commenced to send to the High School their children who have passed through the primary schools, and there is a promise of the school's usefulness being increased and its stability secured. I have, &c, The Hon. the Minister of Education. J. McKinnon, Secretary.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. S, s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 117 17 3 By Management— Grant from vote of General Assembly .. 100 0 0 Office salary .. .. .. 5 0 0 Current income from reserves.. .. 55 4 6 Other office expenses.. .. .. 3 17 4 Paid by School Commissioners .. 150 0 0 Teachers' salaries and allowances .. 176 14 0 School fees .. .. .. .. 84 0 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 2 13 6 Interest .. .. .. .. 012 6 Rents, insurance, and taxes .. .. 19 6 6 Expended on site or buildings .. 200 0 0 School appliances and furniture .. 19 19 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 80 3 11 £507 14 3 £507 14 3

J. M. Killen, Chairman. J. McKinnon, Secretary. Examined and found correct. — J. K. Warburton, Controller and Auditor-General.

THAMES HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Eepoet op the Board. This term there is some increase in the number of pupils, Sixteen new pupils have been enrolled, and the number on the roll is now thirty-five, instead of twenty-eight as during the third term of 1896. Out of this small number two passed the Matriculation examination ; one gained a certificate at the District Senior Scholarship examination, and two passed the Junior Civil Service examination. An assistant master is at present urgently needed, but the funds hitherto would not allow the additional expense. The governors are quite sensible of the difficulties of carrying on a High School with two teachers only, and better work could be done with the assistance of another competent teacher. Thames, 23rd February, 1897. 8. Caeter, Secretary.

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2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. j Expenditure. £ s. d. To Current income from reserves .. .. 255 8 2[ By Balance .. .. .. 54 2 1 Paid by School Commissioners .. .. 150 0 0 Management— School fees .. .. .. .. 239 10 i Office salary .. .. .. 30 0 0 Goldfields revenue .. .. .. 253 8 7 Other office expenses .. .. 718 6 Sundry .. .. .. .. 0 5 0 Other expenses of management .. 16 4 6 Teachers' salaries and allowances .. 500 0 0 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 10 4 0 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. .. 24 8 4 Book and stationery account, and other temporary advances .. .. .. 26 211 Fencing, repairs, &c. .. .. .. 15 16 10 Insurance and taxes .. .. .. 14 16 9 Interest .. .. .. .. 406 Balance .. .. .. .. 194 17 8 £898 12 1 £898 12 1 Statement of Assets and Liabilities on 31st December, 1896. Assets. £ s. d. Liabilities. To Uncollected rents .. .. .. 427 5 2 Nil. Uncolleeted school-fees .. .. 228 13 8 Balance in bank .. .. .. 194 17 8 £850 16 6 Thomas Radfokd, Chairman. S. Cabteb, Secretary and Treasurer. Examined and found correct — J. K. Waebueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

3. Woek op the Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. — Same as for the Junior University Scholarship Examination, namely : Latin, French, English, mathematics, science (chemistry and electricity). Lowest. —Latin —Via Latina (Abbott). French—Macmillan's Progressive French Course, Part I. English Grammar —Mason. English Composition —Abbott's How to Write Clearly. Arithmetic —Hamblm Smith. English History —Nelson's Eoyal English History. Chemistry and Physics —Science Primers. 4. Scholarships. The Governors grant four free-tuition scholarships. The scholars are selected by competitive examination.

NEW PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ a. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 113 9 8 By Management— Current income from reserves .. 449 16 1 Office salary .. .. .. 25 0 0 Paid by School Commissionerß .. 248 G 8 Other office expenses .. .. 110 3 School fees .. .. .. .. 354 14 0 Teachers' salaries and allowances .. 778 3 0 Examinations—Examiners' fees .. 36 15 0 Other expenses .. .. .. 3 3 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 20 9 6 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 25 16 10 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. .. .. 56 2 1 Site and buildings— Purchases and new works .. .. 84 12 9 Fencing, repairs, &c. .. .. 28 0 2 Rents, insurance, and taxes .. 20 7 6 Bush-felling, surveys, &c, on endowments .. .. .. .. 17 14 6 Hire of piano, £2 ; shield, 15s. .. 2 15 0 Refunds to scholars .. .. .. 4 4 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 61 12 10 £1,166 6 5 £1,166 6 5 J. M. Boy, Chairman. E. Veale, Secretary and Treasurer. Examined and found correct— J. K. Wakbubton, Controller and Auditor-General.

2. Woek of Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. —Latin —Csesar, Book I.; Via Latina, exercises 49 to 82. French—Grammaire dcs Grammaires, pages 187 to 202, and even exercises 114 to 132; Chardenal's Advanced Course, exercises Ito 14; Le Conscrit; conjugation of irregular verbs. Arithmetic (general)— Algebra— Hall and Knight, pages 1 to 207, with omissions. Euclid (Hall and Stevens) —I. to IV., 10; exercises on Books I. and 11. History—Bansoine, matriculation period. Geography—. Chisholm, except Asia; Zealandia Geography. Grammar—Mason, pages 1 to 125, omitting declension and conjugation of Saxon words. Literature —Tempest. Science—electricity and magnetism.

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8

Lowest. —Latin—Elementa Latina, pages 1 to 25. French—Dejardin, exercises 1 to 45. Arithmetic—Colenso, to end of vulgar fractions, omitting areas and solids. Algebra—Hall and Knight, pages 1 to 33. Euclid (Hall and Stevens), 1., 1 to 12. History—Primary, period 1216 to 1660. Geography—Petrie, pages 1 to 56. Grammar—Mason's First Notions, pages 1t074 ; simple parsing and analysis. Literature—Lady of the Lake. Dictation, composition, &c. 3. SCHOLAESHIPS. The Board gave free tuition to three scholars. Six scholarships of the Education Board were held at the school.

WANGANUI COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. Genebal Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ a. d. Expenditure. £ a. d. To Balance .. .. .. 51 14 0 By Management— Current income from reaerves .. .. 836 9 8 Office salary .. .. .. 40 0 0 Refund, insurance .. .. .. 3 7 3 Other office expenses .. .. 14 0 0 Sale old building and firewood .. .. 17 18 6 Other expenses of management .. 24 14 6 Law charges .. .. .. .. 7 10 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 7 10 0 Rates, refund .. .. .. .. 0 15 0 Site and buildings— Fencing .. .. .. .. 18 0 Purchases and new works .. .. 267 13 7 Fencing, repairs, &c. .. .. 95 2 3 Rents, insurance, and taxes .. .. 133 19 9 Interest .. .. .. .. 102 8 8 Law charges .. .. .. 11 2 4 Balance .. .. .. .. 222 1 10 £918 13 5 £918 13 5 Edwaed N. Lipfiton, Secretary. Examined and found correct —A. C. Eitchie, Auditor.

2. Work of Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest.— Greek, Latin, French, English, science, mathematics, all up to Junior Scholarship standard, and divinity. Lowest. —Latin, English (including history, geography, composition), arithmetic, science, drawing, and divinity. Carpentering classes are conducted by Mr. Dunn, one of the staff. Under his supervision, three large buildings have been erected entirely by the boys—namely, the cricket pavilion; the new workshop, 40 ft. by 20 ft. ; and a large building, measuring some 60 ft. by 20 ft., and containing a class-room, a laboratory, and a music-room. With the exception of the windows, and the brickwork of the chimneys, everything was done by Mr. Dunn and the boys, even to the gas-fittings. 3. Scholarships. Seven scholarships of the Education Board were held at the school. The headmaster gave sixteen scholarships, varying in value from £12 to £57.

WANGANUI (GIELS) HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Ebvbnue Account, 1896. £ s. d. By Office Staff— £ s. d. To Balance frem 1895 .. .. .. 775 13 1 Secretary.. .. .. .. 20 0 0 Interest on mortgages .. .. 303 14 6 Clerk .. .. .. .. 20 0 0 Rents from endowments leased .. 248 10 0 General expenses .. .. .. 50 411 School Commissioners — Teachers'salaries and foes .. .. 1,152 2 0 Taranaki .. .. .. .. 151 13 4 Caretaker .. .. .. .. 46 16 0 Wellington .. .. .. 37 710 School books and stationery .. .. 49 10 3 School fees — Examination fee .. '.. .. 15 0 0 Tuition .. .. .. .. 1,158 0 4 Furnishing Account .. .. .. 23 14 10 Boarding.. .. .. .. 1,229 6 8 Fire insurance .. .. .. 17 17 6 Insurance .. .. .. .. 50 0 0 School requisites .. .. .. 65 8 0 Contractor's deposit .. .. .. 5 0 0 Borough rates .. .. .. 19 14 0 Bank interest .. .. .. 17 19 6 Insurance, refund for improvements .. 50 0 0 Boarding fees .. .. .. 1,237 13 0 Telephone .. .. .. .. 6 0 0 Building .. .. .. .. 86 13 0 Contractors'deposits.. .. .. 5 0 0 Plans and supervision .. .. 5 5 0 Repairs .. .. .. .. 34 6 9 Site .. .. .. .. 6 2 7 Balance .. .. .. .. 1,029 18 5 £3,959 5 9 £3,959 5 9 A. A. Browne, Secretary. Examined and found correct— J. K. Warbueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

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2. Woek of the Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. —English and French as for B.A. degree, I'niversity of New Zealand. Latin, mathematics, mechanics, heat, history, and geography, as for University Junior Scholarships. Scripture— Life of St. Paul, and the history of Bible translations in England. Gymnastics. Lowest. —Beading and spelling from Longmans' Fourth Eeader. Grammar —part of Mason's First Notions of English Grammar. Geography—the English Colonies. History—Tudor period. Arithmetic—revision of simple rules and compound rules. French—Chardenal, Part I. (part). Scripture—Life of St. Paul. Gymnastics. Sewing. 3. Scholaeships. The Board of Governors gave three scholarships : one of £40 and free tuition, and two of free tuition.

WELLINGTON COLLEGE AND GIELS' HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Eepoet of the Boaed. The Governors of Wellington College and Girls' High School are again able to report that during the year 1896 the two institutions under their care have been carried on satisfactorily, and have done good work. The College at the close of the year was attended by 245 pupils; the Girls' High School at the same time had a roll of 127. At the last University examinations one boy from the College passed the Junior Scholarship Examination with credit; one passed the Medical Preliminary ; one the Solicitor's Entrance Examination ; twelve passed the Matriculation Examination ; and four qualified for matriculation on the Junior Scholarship papers; three passed the Senior and seven the Junior Civil Service Examinations. Of the pupils at the Girls' High School, one gained a Junior University Scholarship; one passed the Medical Preliminary, and one the Junior Scholarship Examination, with credit; fourteen passed the Matriculation Examination, and three qualified for matriculation on the Junior Scholarship papers ; one passed the Senior and six the Junior Civil Service Examinations. The Board of Governors cannot but again impress upon the Government the position of difficulty in which they are placed by having to meet the burden of interest upon moneys which they were forced to borrow in order to provide the necessary school buildings. They would again remind the Government that the moneys borrowed for the erection of the Girls' High School were borrowed under the express sanction of the then Premier and Minister of Education, and under the promise of assistance from the Government; and again they would urge the claims of Wellington for such assistance in the matter of secondary education as has been given to other cities of the colony. Wellington, 2nd April, 1897. Chaeles P. Powles, Secretary.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Current income from reserves.. .. 1,771 2 2 By Balance .. .. .. .. 1,720 010 Paid by School Commissioners .. 62 12 2 Management— School fees.. .. .. .. 4,198 11 2 Office salary .. .. .. 165 0 0 Levin Scholarship money .. .. 20 0 0 Other office expenses .. .. 30 0 0 Moore and Rhodes Income Account .. 45 0 0 Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 3,167 10 0 Turnbull Scholarship Income Account 47 0 0 Examiners' fees .. .. .. 89 12 0 Mary Scholarship Income Account .. 50 0 0 Scholarships .. .. .. 93 15 0 Refunds and discounts .. .. 419 0 Prizes, two years .. .. .. 89 111 Prizes .. .. .. .. 5 10 6 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 223 14 3 Balance .. .. .. .. 1,615 811 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. .. .. 156 9 5 Site and buildings— Labour .. .. .. .. 17 15 0 New works .. .. .. 33 13 9 Drainage .. .. .. .. 251 7 0 Fencing, repairs, &c. .. .. 11l 9 9 Playgrounds .. .. .. 154 5 4 Insurance, and taxes .. .. 323 17 8 Furniture and apparatus .. .. 86 0 7 Interest on Current Account .. .. 100 3 10 Endowments — Rates and survey .. .. .. 98 10 1 Interest on cost of reclaimed land .. 136 2 8 Fencing .. .. .. .. 110 Tuition-fees refunded or paid over to Technical School .. .. .. 106 12 6 Legal expenses .. .. .. 216 0 Interest on cost of buildings .. .. 658 5 4 £7,820 3 11 £7,820 3 11 J. E. Blaib, Chairman. Chas. P. Powles, Secretary. Examined and found correct— J. K. Wakbueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

3. WOEK OF THE HIGHEST AND LOWEST CLASSES. Boys. Highest. —Latin —Virgil, .ZEneid, Book XI.; Livy, Book V. ; Horace, Odes, Book II.; sight translation; Bradley's Arnold, Chapters 1 to 50; Bradley's Aids to Latin Prose; Horton's History of the Eomans; Notes on Antiquities. Mathematics—Euclid, Books 1., 11., 111., IV.,

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and VI., with exercises on all (Hall and Stevens); algebra, to permutations and combinations (Hall and Knight) ; arithmetic, general (Hamblin Smith) ; trigonometry, to solution of triangles (Lock). Science —Jago's Advanced Chemistry; practical chemistry; tests for bases and acids; Wright's Heat. English—Shakespeare, Twelfth Night; Macaulay's Essay on Pitt; Chaucer, Prologue; Morris's Elementary Historical Grammar; Hewitt and Beach's Manual of Our Mother Tongue; Nicol's English Composition Exercises; paraphrasing; essay-writing. French —Edmond About, Contes Choisis; Moliere's Tartuffe ; Blouet's French Composition; Brachet's School Grammar; Vecqueray's Examination-papers. Lowest. —Morrison's English Grammar, Part I.; Henry Hill's Geography for Standards 11., 111., and IV.; Longmans' Simple Stories from English History, Nos. 1 and 2; Eeaders— "Century" No. 4, "Ship" Nos. 3 and 5; essays, dictation, spelling, writing. Latin —Hardly any. Arithmetic —Standards 11. and 111., Southern Cross series. Girls. Highest. —Latin, mathematics, French, English, heat, and botany, as for Junior Scholarship Examination. Loivest. —Grammar—Parts of speech, simple parsing, and analysis. Geography—The four continents and New Zealand, without detail. History —Gardiner's Outlines of English History, William I. to Henry VI. Composition—on stories and poetry read from various authors. Dictation and spelling—from Longmans' Eeader, Standard V. Eeading. Arithmetic —Weights and measures; L.C.M. and H.C.F.; the four simple and compound rules. 4. SCHOLAESHIPS. College. College scholarships : Free education, three. Seven scholarships arising from funds given by private benefactors, and eight Education Board scholarships, were held at the College. Girls' School. College scholarships : Free education, eight. Izard scholarship, £25, one. Eight Education Board scholarships were held at the Girls' School.

NAPIEE HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Eepobt of the Boabd. The Board of Governors, as at present constituted, is composed of the following gentlemen : Mr. J. W. Carlile (Chairman), and Captain Eussell, M.H.E., elected by the Education Board; Messrs. G. H. Swan and J. W. Neal, elected by the Municipal Council of Napier ; Mr. W. Shrimpton and T. Moore, M.D., by the Hawke's Bay County Council; Messrs. E. Harding and T. Crosse, by the Waipawa County Council; Mr. H. J. Twigg, by the Wairoa County Council; Mr. H. A. Cornford, by the Governer in Council. The schools were examined by Mr. T. W. Eowe, M.A., immediately before the recess. His report to the Governors shows that the work of the schools is satisfactory. Six boys and five girls passed the Matriculation Examination. The average attendance at the boys' school for the year was fifty, and at the girls' school fifty-nine. During the past year extensive necessary alterations and improvements have been made in the school playground. J. W. Caelile, Chairman. 2nd February, 1897. David Sidey, Secretary.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 816 10 3 By ManagementDeposit receipt repaid .. .. 7SO 0 0 Office salary .. .. .. 60 0 0 Endowments—- Other office expenses .. .. 19 011 Current income from reserves .. 351 12 6 Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 1,618 18 0 From property not a reserve .. 745 0 0 Music teachers .. .. .. 143 9 0 Interest on moneys invested and on Examinations—Examiners' fees .. 18 15 0 unpaid purchase-money .. .. 161 17 6 Scholarships — Board fees, rail and Paid by School Commissioners— coach fares .. .. .. 227 11 9 Examiner's fee .. .. .. 20 0 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 14 19 7 School fees .. .. .. .. 1,164 7 3 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 25 14 0 Board of scholarship children, rail and Caretaker's salary .. .. .. 124 16 3 coach fares, paid by School Commis- Book and stationery account and other sioners .. .. .. .. 226 9 6 temporary advances .. .. 77 6 5 Books, &c, sold and other refunds .. 74 5 0 i Fencing, repairs, &c. .. .. 100 15 10 Refund cadet corps .. .. .. 10 0 0 Rents, insurance, and taxes .. .. 71 18 8 Half fence put up .. .. 3 810 Interest on current account .. .. 0 4 0 Excess of school fees paid .. .. 1 16 0 Expended on site or buildings .. 531 3 5 Returned fees .. .. .. 1 16 0 Placed on mortgage .. .. .. 1,100 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 188 18 0 £4,325 6 10 £4,325 6 10 J. W. Caelile, Chairman. David Sidey, Secretary and Treasurer. Examined and found correct — J. K. Waebubton, Controller and Auditor-General.

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3. Work of the Highest and Lowest Classes. Boys. Highest. —Mathematics —Euclid, Books I. to VI., with riders; algebra, to permutations and combinations ; trigonometry, to solution of triangles; arithmetic, general. Latin—Virgil, iEneid, Books I. and II.; Cicero, de Senectute; Bradley's Prose and Grammar. Prench—X. de Maistre, Voyage autour de ma chambre; sight-readings, conversation, and composition. English language and literature—History of language, general grammar, and composition ; Chaucer's Prologue; Dramatists of the Elizabethan period. History —England, 1688 to 1837. Geography, physical and general. Science—Physiology and agricultural chemistry. Loivest. —About Standard 111., with elementary Latin. A carpenter's shop with an efficient instructor has been provided, but very little advantage is now taken of it. Girls. Highest. —English history, 1688 to 1837. English literature—Elizabethan authors ; Chaucer's Prologue. Grammar —Mason (general); Morris (historical). Composition. Geography, general, physical and political. Arithmetic—whole subject. Algebra, including quadratics, surds, progression, ratio, and proportion. Euclid, Books I. to IV. Trigonometry—Lock, to solution of triangles. Latin—Kennedy's Primer; Church's Exercises, Part II.; Virgil, iEneid, Book V.; Cicero, De Senectute (part) ; unseen translation. French—Chardenal, Part II.; Brachet; Voyage aux Pyrenees; composition. Botany, to matriculation standard. Theory of Music, to matriculation standard. Loivest. —History—Gardiner, William I. to Edward IV. Geography—New Zealand, Australia, and outlines of Europe; easy definitions in physical geography. Grammar—Parts of speech ; elementary analysis and parsing, letter-writing and easy composition. Arithmetic—Simple and compound rules; reduction; bills of parcels. Prench —Chiefly conversation on Gouin System; Illustrated Prench Grammar by Goly and Goujon. Object-lessons on plants. Needlework. Classsinging. Drilling. 4. Scholarships. The school gave free education to twenty-three holders of scholarships given by the School Commissioners, and nineteen given by the Education Board.

GISBOENE HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Report of the Board. Sir,— Gisborne, 24th March, 1897. I have to report that under arrangements made with the Education Board of Hawke's Bay, which were reported to you last year, secondary education in the District of Poverty Bay has been carried on during 1896 in the Gisborne District High School. The Governors have been favoured with reports of work done in the secondary classes of the District High School, and are satisfied that the instruction given has been efficient and thorough. As in former years, the Governors have granted scholarships for one and two years to children in attendance at the State schools in the district, which are tenable at the Gisborne District High School. It has been found that in most cases scholars so aided have made considerable progress. I am, &c, The Hon. the Minister of Education. W. Morgan, Chairman.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d..| Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. ..646 311j By Scholarships.. .. .. .. 141 18 0 Current income from reserves .. .. 86 17 4 j Prizes . ■ .. .. .. 22 6 Interest on moneys invested and on un- Site and buildings .. .. .. 249 14 0 paid purchase-money .. .. 106 5 0 Furniture .. .. .. .. 6 0 0 Paid by School Commissioners .. 356 14 3 Subsidy, Hawke's Bay Education Board 25 0 0 School fees .. .. .. .. 2 2 0 Mortgages— Interest accrued on deposit in Savings- De Lautour .. .. .. 150 0 0 Bank .. .. .. .. 10 15 9 Mrs. Hair .. .. .. 250 0 0 Fixed deposit, Bank of New Zealand .. 011 8 Balance .. .. .. .. 509 9 2 Insurance on house .. .. .. 124 13 9 £1,334 8 8 £1,334 3 8 W. Moegan, Chairman. C. A. de Lautour, Secretary. Examined and found correct.- —J. K. Wakburton, Controller and Auditor-General.

NELSON COLLEGES. 1. Report of the Governors. The Examiners' reports have dealt very fully with the work of the Colleges, and are, on the whole, exceedingly favourable. They show that the work throughout has been thorough and complete, and the results must be as gratifying to the parents of the pupils as they are to the staffs and the Governors. The Boys' College. The number of pupils on the rolls has shown an increase on those of the previous year. The College continues to preserve its very satisfactory record, having again obtained two

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University Junior Scholarships. The number of scholarships secured by our students for years past has, in proportion to the number of pupils, largely exceeded that obtained by any other College. The number of University students keeping terms still keepa up. The work of the Sixth Form is adapted to suit their requirements without being allowed to interfere with those of other pupils. As usual, a large number of boys have successfully passed the Civil Service examinations, one boy securing the position of second for the whole colony. It is very satisfactory to note the number of former pupils of the College who are securing distinctions in their several professions; amongst whom special reference must be made to E. Eutherford, who has gained a prominent and honourable position in the scientific world in Europe, and has recently been called upon to read a paper before the British Association. The College building has undergone considerable renovation, and is now in every way suitably fitted for high and complete educational purposes. The rooms and passages throughout the building are hung with artistic and instructive pictures, purchased in England and elsewhere by the Principal during his recent travels. The Girls' College. The number on the rolls continues to show an increase, especially amongst the boarders. Three students have passed the second years' terms examination, and also the first section of the B.A. examination. Twelve pupils have passed the Matriculation examination of 1896, and it is worthy of note that all who entered for the recent Civil Service examination passed, one having taken the second position amongst the seniors for the whole colony. The College building has undergone considerable improvement to fit it for the increasing number of pupils entering.

2. Statement of Eecbipts and Bxpendituee for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure.. £ s. d. To Interest .. .. .. .. 481 14 3 By Governors' fees .. .. .. 99 19 10 Eents .. .. .. .. 1,178 7 6 Auditors'fees .. .. .. 10 10 0 School Commissioners' subsidy .. 300 0 0 Law costs .. .. .. .. 36 10 4 Sale of land .. .. .. 40 0 0 Kates and taxes on properties .. 27 17 3 Insurances.. .. .. .. 11 8 3 Printing and advertising .. .. 14 13 6 Commission .. .. .. 10 1 4 Repairs .. .. .. .. 17 10 0 Stationery .. .. .. .. 12 8 10 Office rent .. .. .. .. 13 15 0 Office furniture .. .. .. 34 11 10 Office cleaning, postages, gas, &c. .. 44 5 7 Secretary .. .. .. .. 125 0 0 Interest on Girls' College mortgage .. 110 0 0 Boys' College. To Boarding-fees .. .. .. 1,020 6 1■ By Boarding expenses .. .. .. 908 3 8 Tuition-fees .. .. .. 1,102 14 1 Tuition expenses .. .. .. 1,350 5 2 Scholarships— Foundation .. .. .. 60 0 0 Endowed .. .. .. 181 16 0 Stationery and prizes .. .. 81 16 6 Printing and advertisements .. .. 30 5 0 Subscription to sports and magazine .. 23 3 0 Examiners' fees .. .. .. 31 13 0 Gas .. .. .. .. 57 4 2 Law costs .. .. .. .. 19 16 6 Rates and taxes .. .. .. 43 14 9 Fire insurances .. .. .. 22 10 0 Repairs .. .. .. .. 130 8 2 Furniture .. ... .. .. 65 2 5 Telephone .. ..».. .. 600 Secretary .. .. .. .. 125 0 0 Sundries .. .. .. .. 312 0 Girls' College. To Boarding-fees .. .. .. 892 12 0 By Boarding expenses .. .. .. 755 2 4 Tuition-fees .. .. .. 911 18 10 Tuition expenses .. .. .. (535 19 q Scholarships— Foundation .. .. .. 60 4 0 Endowed .. .. .. 52 12 0 Governors' fees .. .. .. 30 0 0 Stationery and prizes .. .. 77 17 0 Printing and advertising .. .. 22 0 6 Examiners' fees .. .. .. 31 13 0 Gas .. .. .. .. 42 2 9 Law costs .. .. .. ~ 19 16 6 Rates and taxes .. .. .. 46 17 9 Fire insurances .. .. .. 21 0 0 Repairs .. .. .. .. 52 19 4 Furniture .. .. .. .. 114 q q Sundries .. .. .. .. 14 6 Secretary .. .. .. .. 125 0 0 Balance .. .. .. 74 2 0 £5,927 12 9 £5,927 12 9 J. Holloway, Secretary. We certify that we have examined the above accounts, and compared them with the several vouchers relating thereto, and have found them correct. A. A. Scaife,) . ~. John King, } Aaditor *-

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3. Work in Highest and Lowest Classes. Boys' College. Highest. —English—Shakespeare, Tempest and King Lear ; Addison, selections from Spectator (Airey); Chaucer, Prologue to Canterbury Tales; Stopford Brooke, Primer of English Literature ; Mason's English Grammar ; Abbott, How to Write Clearly ; Scott and Dalgleish, Higher Grade English. Latin—Virgil, Georgics, Book II.; Livy, Book VIII., chapters Ito3o ; Csesar, Book I.; sight translations from Livy, Virgil, Horace, Csesar. Eoman History—Horton. Grammar, &c.— Via Latina; Bradley's Arnold; Champneys and Eundall. French—Eacine, Athalie ; Laeombe, Petite histoire dv peuple francais; composition (Blouet), and re-translation; grammar, Eve and De Baudiss, and Chardenal II.; sight translation from various authors. Mathematics —Euclid, I. to VI. (Hall and Stevens); algebra, to binomial theorem (Hall and Knight, and Jones and Cheyne); trigonometry (Lock and Ward) ; applied statics (Smith and Lock) ; applied hydrostatics (Smith) ; applied dynamics (Lock). Science —Sound and light (Deschanel); Examples in Physics (Jones). Lowest. —English grammar—Hall's Primary. History—Gardiner's Outlines. Geography— Petrie's First. Physical geography — Geikie's Primer. Oral teaching in English — objectlessons, &c. Latin—Elementa Latina. French—Chardenal 1., early portion. Arithmetic, to practice (Southern Cross Series). Beading and writing daily. Girls' College. Highest. —Mathematics—Algebra (Todhunter), to binomial theorem ; Euclid, I. to IV., and VI.; trigonometry (Lock), to end. Latin —Abbott's Latin Prose; Bradley's Arnold's Latin Prose ; antiquities and Eoman history; Virgil, Georgics, Book 11. ; Livy, Book VIII. English— Morris's Historical Grammar; Abbott and Seeley's English Lessons for the English People; Abbott's How to Write Clearly ; Anglo-Saxon and Middle English Primers ; Eomola; The Tempest; King Lear ; Morley's Literature (chapters on Elizabethan literature). French—Brachet's Historical Grammar; Wellington College Grammar ; Saintsbury's Literature (chapters on 17th century); Athalie ; Bossuet, Oraisons Funebres ; Andromaque; Bue's Idioms. Science —Heat, sound, and light. Lowest. —Arithmetic—Simple and compound rules. English—Beading; spelling; Mrs. Gatty's Parables from Nature. French —Chardenal's First French Course. Geography—General sketch. History —Gardiner. Sewing. Club exercises. Class drawing is taught throughout the school. The girls have been encouraged to attend cooking lectures, but no class is regularly held. 4. Scholarships. Boys' College. Endowed: Tinline, £52 125.; Newcome, £24; Eichmond, £24; Stafford, £20; Fell, £16. College: One at £32 12s. ; one at £16 ; one at £14 ; one at £12 125.; one at £12 ; one at £6; one at £5 ; one at £4 ; one at £3. Girls' College. Tinline: £52 12s. Governors' Fees : Two at £15. College : Two at £15 ; two at £12 12s. ; one at £5. School Commissioners : Seven at £12 12s. Thirteen scholarships of the Nelson Education Board and one of the Marlborough Education Board were held at the Boys' College ; and eleven of the Nelson Education Board and two of the Marlborough Education Board were held at the Girls' College.

GEEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL. Geneeal Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, National Bank— By Fire insurance .. .. .. 010 0 Current Account .. .. .. 18 510 Bates .. .. .. .. 716 3 Fixed deposits .. .. .. 150 0 0 Salary, secretary .. .. .. 5 0 0 Loans repaid.. .. .. .. 195 0 0 Grant, Grey Education Board .. .. 60 0 0 Interest .. .. .. .. 34 0 0 Balance, National Bank— Grant, Westland School Commissioners 60 0 0 Current Account .. .. .. 819 7 Fixed deposits .. .. ... 375 0 0 £457 5 10 £457 5~70 Eichaed Nancaeeow, Chairman. P. W. Eiemenschneidee, Secretary. Audited and found correct. — J. K. Waebueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

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HOKITIKA HIGH SCHOOL. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. & s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. 992 9 0 By Management .. .. .. 5 5 0 Interest on moneys invested .. .. 37 0 0 Teachers' salaries (grant to Westland Paid by School Commissioners.. .. 60 0 0 Education Board .. .. .. 72 10 0 Rent of dwelling-house and grounds .. 45 0 0 Fencing, repairs, &c. .. .. .. 101 1 6 Deposit on tender .. .. .. 10 0 0 Insurance .. .. .. .. 212 0 Interest .. .. .. .. 0 10 Balance .. .. .. 962 19 0 £1,144 9 0 £1,144 9 0 John McWhietbe, Chairman. Charles Kirk, Secretary. Audited and found correct— J. K. Warburton, Controller and Auditor-General.

CHRIST'S COLLEGE GEAMMAB SCHOOL. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 15th May, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Endowments — By Balance .. .. .. .. 3,528 7 2 Price of land sold .. .. .. 1,700 0 0 Management—Office salary .. .. 175 0 0 Current income from land .. .. 1,795 14 3 Other office expenses .. .. 16 8 7 Income from Scholarships endowments 874 13 10 Teachers' salaries and allowances (inSehoolfees.. .. .. .. 1,966 1 6 eluding £300 to widow of late teacher) 2,923 010 Insurance on building damaged by fire.. 30 0 0 Examinations — Sundry incidental receipts not classified 15 18 . 8 Examiners' fees for scholarships, &c. 44 2 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 2,009 12 3 Other expenses .. .. .. 1119 1 Scholarships .. .. .. 808 10 4 Prizes .. .. .. .. 27 8 11 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 72 12 2 Gleaning, fuel, light, caretaker, &o. .. 212 19 7 Fencing, repairs, &c... .. .. 106 1 2 Insurance .. .. .. .. 29 10 3 Interest on current account .. .. 129 1 0 Endowments Account— Expended on buildings .. .. 120 0 0 Eepairs to building damaged by fire .. 30 0 0 Grant to Boys' Games Fund .. .. 103 14 6 Expenses in connection with land estate, viz., rates, repairs, insurance, and lawcosts .. .. .. .. 53 411 £8,392 0 6 £8,392 0 C C, Chbistchuech, Warden. W. G. Bbittain, Bursar. Accounts (from which the above are extracts) were audited by Mr. A. A. M. McKellar.

2. Work done during the year 1896. Highest. —Latin, French, English, mathematics, and, as alternatives, Greek and science (chemistry and heat) to standard of Junior University Scholarships ; divinity. Lowest (Preparatory Department).—Relfe's Reader, No. 4, to page 212. Repetition. Brief History of England, to page 88. Geography—Zealandia, Part 1, and a considerable portion of Part 2. Grammar —parts of speech and simple parsing; construction of sentences. Composition —Reproduction of descriptive narratives; letter-writing. Arithmetic —addition, substraction, multiplication, division (simple and compound), with easy problems. Drawing is taught as an optional subject, without extra fee and in school hours; carpentry and joinery, wood-turning and forge-work, outside school hours, at a fee of ss. per term. 3. Scholarships and Exhibitions. There are many scholarships, so arranged that, taken in succession, they cover the whole period of school life from an early age until the limit of age for Junior University Scholarships has been reached. The Entrance Scholarships are open to all boys who have not already entered the school; the others both to boys already attending it and to those from other schools. For Somes Scholarships a preference is to be given ceteris paribus to the kin of the foundress, Mrs. Maria Somes, or of her husband, the late Joseph Somes, Esq.; and candidates must be members of the Church of England, or of some church in communion with it. This restriction does not apply to Entrance Scholarships, or to the special grants of free education sometimes made by the governing body to meet special cases. Entrance Scholarships. —Six are to be offered, if funds permit, in each yearly, namely : (a) Two to boys under the age of thirteen years on the first day of December in that year ; (b) two to boys under the age of twelve years on the same day ; and (c) two to the most deserving boys of either age. The subjects of the examination, which is to be held in the month of December, are English (composition, grammar, &c), arithmetic, geography (general), and history. The scholarships are tenable for two years, and cover the ordinary school fees for tuition. Somes Junior Scholarships. —Five are to be offered, if funds permit, in each year, namely : (a) Three to boys under the age of sixteen years on the first day of December in that year ; and (b) two to boys under the age of fourteen years on the same day. Candidates, to be eligible, must pass

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satisfactorily a preliminary examination in divinity. The subjects of the examination, which is to be held in the month of September, are, for both classes, Latin, English, mathematics, French, and either Greek, or geography and English history. The scholarships are tenable for two years, and of the value of £18 per annum, with the addition of £15 per annum in the case of boarders in one of the school-houses. Somes Senior Scholarships. —Four are to be offered, if funds permit, in each year, namely: (a) Two to boys under the age of eighteen years on the first day of December in that year ; and (b) two to boys under the age of seventeen years on the same day. In awarding the scholarships use is made of the examination held by the University of New Zealand for Junior University Scholarships ; and, to be eligible, a candidate in Class A must obtain at least 2,000 marks, a candidate in Class Bat least 1,500 marks, in that examination. The scholarships are tenable for one year, and of the value of £25, with the addition of £20 in the case of boarders in one of the schoolhouses. Somes Scholarships for Music. —Sixteen scholarships, covering the school fees for tuition, and eight of half the value, are given after examination. The boys elected become members of the Cathedral choir. The junior and senior scholarships given by the Board of Education are tenable in the school, and may be held together with Entrance or Somes Scholarships. Buller and Eeay Foundation.—Exhibitions are given to the sons of clergy ministering in the Diocese of Christchurch, and to others who may require assistance; also six exhibitions of £2 are awarded at the end of each term to members of the Chapel choir, and two of £12 a year for two years to specially deserving boys on leaving the Cathedral choir.

BOYS' HIGH SCHOOL, CHEISTCHUECH. Ebport fob 1896. A new wing was added to the school this year and opened on the 20th February. It comprises the lecture-room already described. Above the lecture-room are two olass-rooms; in a basement below it is a new laboratory, a dark room, &c. The accommodation is already fully occupied. Gymnastic apparatus has been fitted up in a large room called the " Orderly-room " (used also for cadets), and large voluntary classes are held in it daily under the direction of a master. New outbuildings, comprising urinals, &c, were also erected in 1896. The staff comprised the headmaster, nine full-time masters, two part-time masters, and visiting masters in drill, swimming, singing, model-drawing and carpentry. This, with 259 boys on the roll, gives a somewhat high average of pupils per master. At the recent December examinations fifteen boys matriculated, three passed the Medical Preliminary, one boy headed the list of Junior University scholars, and three others passed that examination with credit, one of whom obtained a Gammack scholarship. One boy was second in order of merit on the Junior Civil Service list for 1896; and in that year the degree of M.A. was awarded to Mr. G. Lancaster, an old pupil, with double first-class honours in mathematics and chemistry ; to Mr. H. Craddock, with second-class honours in Latin and Greek, and to Mr. J. M. Waddell, with second-class honours in Latin and English. Another old pupil won the John Tinline scholarship, and another the Senior University scholarship for political science. The school is examined every year by outside examiners appointed by the Board.

2. General Statement of the Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 32 13 9 By Office salary " .. .. .. 90 0 0 Current income from reserves .. 3,084 5 2 Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 3,885 0 0 School fees .. .. .. .. 2,058 10 6 Examinations— Interest on Current Account .. .. 10 3 3 Examiners' fees .. .. .. 78 3 0 Interest on promissory note for rent .. 2 8 5 Other expenses .'. .. .. 10 14 0 Sale of parsing notes .. .. 0 7 9 Scholarships .'. .. .. 30 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 33 6 6 Prizes .. .. .. .. 48 19 6 Printing, stationery, advertising, and books .. .. .. .. 163 11 6 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. .. .. 65 9 0 Site and buildings, from current revenue— Purchases and new works .. .. 12 19 0 Poncing, repairs, grounds, &c. .. 106 18 4 Insurance .. .. .. 30 12 4 Endowments, Sales Account— Roads, &c. .. .. .. 116 13 0 Expenses of survey, sales, management, &c. .. .. .. 9 9 6 Inspection of reserves and advertising .. 165 0 10 Chemicals and apparatus .. .. 30 4 3 Interest on Loan Account .. .. 250 0 0 Grants to cricket club and cadet corps 60 0 0 Grant to school library .. .. 5 0 0 Legal expenses .. .. .. 14 12 0 Sundries .. .. .. .. 48 9 1 £5,221 15 4 £5,221 15~4 H. E. Webb, Chairman. A. Cbaceoft Wilson, Eegistrar. xamined and found correct.— J. K. Wakbubton, Controller and Auditor-General.

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3. Woek Done in the Highest and Lowest Forms. Highest. —English—Abbott's How to Write Clearly ; Longmans' Handbook of English Literature, Part 11. ; Milton's Paradise Lost, Book I.; Shakespeare's Henry IV:, Part I.; Macaulay's Essays on Pitt and the Earl of Chatham ; Morris's Historical English Grammar. Latin —Horace, Odes, Book III.; Cicero, Select Letters; Livy, Book XXI. ; Smith's Smaller History of Rome; Bradley's Arnold; Bradley's Aids to Latin Prose; Simpson's Caesarian Latin Prose; Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer. French—Moliere, Le Medecin Malgre Lvi; About, Le Roi dcs Montagnes; Third French Reader and Writer; Moriarty's French Grammar. Mathematics—Work up to Junior Scholarship standard. Science—Jago's Inorganic Chemistry ; Wright's Heat. Lowest. —English—Longmans' Reader, No. 4; Children's Treasury of English Songs, II.; Brief History; Longmans' Junior School Grammar; Spelling; reading; composition; dictation; parsing; transcription. Latin —Macmillan's Shorter Latin Course. Mathematics —Nelson's Royal Arithmetic, No. 4b. Geography —Hill's First Lessons. 4. SCHOLAESHIPS. The school gave free education to thirty-one scholars. Eighteen scholarships of the Education Board were held at the school.

GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL, CHRISTCHURCH. 1. Repobt foe 1896. DuEiNG the year one of the senior teachers of the school, Miss Margaret Lorimer, was promoted to the headship of the Mount Cook Girls' School, Wellington. The work done formerly by Miss Lorimer has been distributed among the remaining members of the staff, and the school will be conducted during the coming year on the new basis. The appointment of a janitress at the beginning of the year has proved most sucessful. The effect on the discipline of the school has been altogether a beneficial one. A set of apparatus for the practical teaching of physics has been obtained from England at some considerable cost, which has made the teaching of science much more interesting as well as more real than heretofore. The school has been very successful in winning scholarships and other honours of the kind. Two of the pupils, Ethel Gibson and Ethel Jacobson, won Junior University Scholarships, and a third, Elsie Sinclair, took a very good place on the credit list, coming within a few marks of the winners. Nine girls passed the University Matriculation Examination, one the Medical Preliminary, and one the Senior Civil Service Examination ; and two of the five senior scholarships given by the North Canterbury Board of Education were won by pupils of the school. The buildings and grounds of the school are well adapted in every way to their purposes ; the class-rooms are lofty, well ventilated, and thoroughly warmed by hot-air pipes in winter. The playground is pleasant, well shaded by lofty trees, and quite secluded from public view. There is also a comfortable well warmed luncheon-room for the girls who remain at school during the mid-day interval.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 1,167 14 11 By Office salary .. .. .. 60 0 0 Current income from reserves .. 304 13 4 Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 1,546 9 4 Interest on moneys invested and on Examinations— unpaid purchase-money .. .. 269 16 5 Examiners' fees .. .. .. 51 16 0 School-fees .. .. .. .. 1,517 5 0 Other expenses .. .. .. 817 11 Interest on current account and invest- Scholarships .. .. .. 240 0 0 ment .. .. .. .. 86 7 2 Prizes .. .. .. .. 26 6 0 Proceeds from cooking class .. .. 32 17 0 Printing, stationery, advertising, stamps, Sale of pianette .. .. .. 16 0 0 and telegrams .. .. .. 92 17 8 Refund of examination-fee .. .. 015 0 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. .. .. 28 4 5 Sites and buildings— Purchases and new works .. .. 12 9 6 Fencing, repairs, &o. .. .. 24 11 6 Rent and insurance .. .. 55 2 0 Physical apparatus .. .. .. 17 15 11 Music .. .. .. .. 1 19 9 Inspecting reserves .. .. .. 10 9 2 Expenses of cooking class .. .. 54 5 4 Sundries .. .. .. .. 9 8 9 Balance .. .. .. .. 1,154 15 7 £3,395 8 10 £3,395 8 10 H. E. Webb, Chairman. A. Ceaceopt Wilson, Registrar. Audited and found correct— J. K. Wabbueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

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3. Work of the Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. — (Work to Junior Scholarship standard) — English — Shakespeare's Coriolanus ; selections from Wordsworth ; Paradise Lost, Book I. ; Mason's Grammar ; Morris's Elementary Historical Grammar; Stopford Brooke's Primer of English Literature ; Abbott's How to Write Clearly; Abbott and Seeley's English Lessons ; Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Primer. Mathematics— Arithmetic (without text-book); Hamblin Smith's Algebra, and Todhunter's Larger Algebra; Lock's Elementary Trigonometry; Euclid (Hall and Stevens), to Junior Scholarship standard. Latin —Horace, Satires and Epistles (selections) ; Livy, Book XVIII.; Virgil, iEneid, Books 11. and IX.; Cicero, Catiline Orations, I. and part of 11. ; Pliny's Letters, Books I, and 11. ; Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, selections ; Cicero, De Ofnciis, Book 111. ; Simpson's Caesarian Prose ; Bradley's Arnold's Latin Prose Composition ; Abbott's Latin Prose through English Idioms. Science—Wright's Heat; Dendy and Lucas's Botany. French—Theuriet, Les enchantements de la foret ; Peuillet, Soman dun jeune hoinine pauvre ; Daudet, Le petit Chose ; Chardenal's Third or Advanced Course. Lowest. —Eoyal Star Eeader No. V. ; Longmans' Junior Grammar ; composition from readingbook ; Eansome's Elementary English History; Petrie's Geography ; elementary botany without text-book ; elementary arithmetic. 4. Scholarships. The school gave free education to seventeen pupils. Nine scholarships of the Education Board were held at the school.

BANGIOEA HIGH SCHOOL. 1. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Current income from reserves.. .. 279 12 0 By Dr. balance at beginning of year .. 6 15 4 School fees.. .. .. .. 137 8 9 Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 213 6 8 Rail fares allowed pupils .. .. 2 0 0 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 2 13 10 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. .. .. 12 5 0 Site and buildings— Fencing, repairs, and painting .. 32 16 10 Insurance .. .. .. .. 4 4 4 Interest .. .. . . .. 016 6 Balance .. .. £218 15 7 Less unpresented cheques 76 13 4 142 2 3 £417 0 9 £417 0 9 E. E. Good, Chairman and Secretary. Audited and found correct— J. K. Warbueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

2. Work of Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. —Bradley's Arnold's Latin Prose ; Livy, Book I.; Euclid—(Hall and Stevens) ; Hall and Knight's Algebra; Shakspeare, Tempest and King Lear; Hughes's Geography; Mason's Grammar ; Hamlin Smith's Arithmetic. Lowest. —Star Eeader, IV. ; Eound the Empire ; Southern Cross Arithmetic ; Longmans' Junior Grammar. 3. Scholarships. The school gave free education to three pupils.

ASHBUETON HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Genehal Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Current income from reserves .. .. 618 12 8, By Dr. balance at beginning of year .. 167 910 School fees .. .. .. 193 10 9 Office salary or salaries .. .. 20 0 0 Books, &c, sold, and other refunds .. 2 10 0 Other office expenses .. .. .. 7 6 6 Balance .. .. .. .. 52 13 8 Other expenses of management .. 317 6 Teachers' salaries and allowances .. 527 1 8 Teachers' house allowance .. .. 40 0 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 13 1 6 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 26 11 2 Cleaning, fuel, light, &c. .. .. 32 16 11 Site and buildings— Fencing, repairs, &o. .. .. 16 15 0 Insurance .. .. .. .. 2 19 0 Interest .. .. .. .. 7 12 6 Clock .. .. .. .. 10 0 Bxohange .. .. .. .. 015 6 £867 7 1 £867 7 1 Andkew Oee, Chairman. Chakles Beaddell, Secretary. Audited and found correct — J. K. Waebueton, Controller and Auditor-General.

3— E. 9.

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18

2. WORK OF THE HIGHEST AND LOWEST CLASSES. Highest. —English—Mason's Grammar; English grammar and composition to matriculation standard. Latin —Via Latina ; Principia Latina, Part 11., pages 63 to 87 ; Csesar, Gallic War, Books 11. and 111. French—Chardenal's Second French Course; grammar to matriculation standard. Arithmetic —whole subject. Euclid—to end of Book IV. Algebra—Hall and Knight, to page 177. Geography—Longmans' School Geography, Europe, Africa, Asia. History—Eansome's History of England, William 111. to Victoria. Lowest. —English —Standard V. grammar and composition. Latin—Via Latina, to page 43Arithmetic —Standard V. work. Euclid, Book 1., to proposition 26. Algebra—Hall and Knight, to page 69. Geography —Gill's Imperial Geography, British Isles, Europe. History—Eansoine's History of England, Charles 11. and James 11. 3. Scholarships. The school gave free education to fourteen pupils.

AKAEOA HIGH SCHOOL. 1. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 117 6 2 By Office expenses .. .. .. 112 6 Current income from reserves .. .. 119 0 2 Teachers' salaries and allowances .. 207 17 6 School-fees .. .. .. .. 125 19 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 2 6 6 Interest, fixed deposit .. .. .. 2 8 0 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 7 13 0 Gleaning, fuel, light, &o. .. .. 7 17 4 Site and buildings .. .. .. 0 7 6 Rents, insurance, and taxes .. .. 35 12 6 Interest .. .. .. .. 0 10 Inspection of reserve .. .. .. 2 2 0 Balance .. .. .. 99 3 6 £364 13 4 ■ £364 13 4 H. C. Jacobson, Chairman, Hon. Secretary and Treasurer.

2. Work op the Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. —Arithmetic ; Algebra, to simple equations and problems. Euclid, Books I. to 111. and part of Book IV. Latin—Abbott's Via Latina; Cassar. English—Hewitt and Beach's Manual; Merchant of Venice; Longmans' School Composition, part of Part 11. French—Maemillan's Course, Book 11., exercises Ito 25. History—Gardiner's Outlines, Parts I. and 11. Geography —Macturk's Physical Geography. Lowest. —Arithmetic, elementary. Latin—Declensions, &c. English —Lady of the Lake. French —Macmillan's Course, Book I. History—Gardiner's Outlines, Parts I. and 11. Geography —Nelson's Eoyal Eeader, No. 4, Europe. Beading, writing, dictation, elementary drawing, &c. 3. SCHOLABSHIPS. The school gave free education to two pupils.

TIMAEU HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Beport op the Boabd. Eight pupils passed the Matriculation Examination held in December, 1896; one boy passed the Preliminary Medical, and one girl, Mary Olive Cunninghame, was awarded a junior scholarship. Two girls passed the Junior Civil Service examination, and another girl, Ethel Hooper, passed the examination for the teachers' E certificate with special mention in domestic economy and freehand drawing. Several former pupils also distinguished themselves in College and University examinations. We may mention particularly Miss Maud Lawrell, B.A. degree, and senior scholarship for Greek; Mr. Alexander Bell, B.A. degree, and senior scholarship for mathematics; Mr. J. S. Cooper, first-class mathematical honours, Canterbury College. Of the rest, two others also gained their B.A. degree. During the year Mr. E. T. Norris, M. A., was appointed a master of the school, to fill the vacancy left by Mr. A. S. M. Poison's removal to Napier.

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2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. j Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 405 15 9, By Management— Endowments— Office salary .. .. .. 70 0 0 Current income from reserves .. 1,296 210 Other office expenses .. .. 15 6 5 Interest on moneys invested and on Other expenses of management .. 27 14 0 unpaid purchase-money .. .. 115 14 4 Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 1,576 3 4 School fees .. .. .. .. 582 15 4 Scholarships .. .. .. 34 0 0 Refund, mortgage, S. McCullough .. 1,000 0 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 18 0 0 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 70 11 9 Cleaning, fuel, lights, &c. .. .. 99 14 0 Book and stationery account, and other temporary advances .. .. 21 17 3 Site and buildings— Fencing, repairs, &c. .. .. 42 12 8 Rents, insurance, and taxes ~, 29 17 9 Endowments— Protective works .. .. .. 119 17 6 Expenses of management, &c. .. 22 1 0 Erection of stables .. .. .. 32 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 1,220 12 7 £3,400 8 3 £3,400 8 3 Heney W. Haepee, Chairman. J. H. Bampield, Secretary. Examined and found correct— J. K. Wabbukton, Controller and Auditor-General.

3. Woek of the Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. —English—Mason's Grammar ; Morris's Historical Outlines ; Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice; Milton, Samson Agonistes; Scott, Guy Mannering; Chaucer, Prologue; Selections from Morris and Skeat's Specimens of Early English; Abbott and Seeley's English Lessons for English People; Stopford Brooke's Primer of English Literature; Peile's Philology. Latin—Cicero, Pro Milone ; Horace, selections from the Satires and Epistles; Horton's History of the Romans ; Smith's Latin Grammar ; Via Latina. French—Moliere, Bourgeois gentilhomme : Racine, Athalie ; About, Contes Choisis; Macmillan's Composition, I.; Brachet and Dussouchet's Grammaire, Cours superieure ; Vecqueray's Examination-papers. Mathematics—Pendlebury's Arithmetic ; Hall and Knight's Algebra; Euclid, Hall and Stevens; Lock's Trigonometry. Science—Botany, electricity, and heat, to Junior Scholarship standard : text-books used, Thome and Bennett's Structural and Physiological Botany ; Sylvanus Thomson's Electricity and Magnetism ; Wright's Elementary Physics ; Jones's Heat. Geography —British Empire ; physical and commercial geography. History —General sketch of the world's history; history of the British Empire, with especial attention to the last hundred years. Commercial Glass. —Book-keeping; Pitman's Shorthand; tots; correspondence; and indexing of letters. Drawing—Freehand, model, geometrical, and mechanical. Loivest. —Cook's First Latin Course (Macmillan). French —Hogben's Natural Method. Tennyson for the Young; Gatty's Parables from Nature; Longmans' History Reader No. 4; Southern Cross copybooks and arithmetics ; Colonial drawing-books ; Grimm's German Tales; Longmans' Junior Composition ; Masterman Ready (Bell's Readers); Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome ; Miall's Object-lessons from Nature. 4. Scholaeships. The Boai - d gave free education to twenty-three holders of Education Board Scholarships, and to others who obtained more than half marks at the Scholarship Examination; to nine holders of Exhibitions at the High School, and to one junior scholar, who is paid £34 in addition to the school fees.

WAIMATB HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Report of Goveenoks. The Governors are pleased to be able to report another year of considerable progress in the work and results of the secondary department of Waimate District High School during 1896. The additional room erected in 1895 for pupils taking secondary education is of barely sufficient size for convenient accommodation of the increased number of pupils. The increase in the number of pupils is no doubt largely attributable to the care and attention of the headmaster and his assistant, and to their efficiency in the performance of their duties. Near the close of year 1896 the Governors made a change in the application of the means at their disposal Heretofore, for some years, they have been paying the school-fees of such pupils taking secondary subjects as were successful in obtaining 60 per cent, of marks at annual examination. This was altered during the year under review, and now the Governors pay the school-fees and railway-fares of all pupils who pass a certain examination each year under the supervision of locally appointed examiners. The result of the new plan appears to be highly successful. There are now nineteen exhibitioners whose fees amounting to £19, and railway-passes amounting to £1 10s. per quarter, are paid by the Board. There is one scholarship holder who is paid £5 per quarter for this year, 1897. The number of pupils attending for secondary subjects on commencement of the plan in 1897 was forty-one, which is an increase of eleven from the close of 1896, when the number attending was thirty; and the Governors consider the increase is in some degree caused by the new system of paying the fees. The subjects taken were algebra, Euclid, Latin, French, English, science, and higher arithmetic ; the favourite subjects with pupils being algebra, Euclid, Latin, and English. The average percentage as result of last annual examination was 81 - 8: thirty pupils, five subjects. As shown in the general statement of income and expenditure for 1896, there was paid by the

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Governors to South Canterbury Education Board, in support of teaching-staff for secondary education at Waimate District High School, £209 ss. ; to scholarship holders, £32 10s. ; High School pupils' fees, £51 ; prizes, £3 3s. „. „ „, . W. Coltman, Chairman.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ i. d. I Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 1,553 12 1 By ManagementCurrent income from reserves .. 192 0 8 Office salary 12 12 0 Interest on fixed deposits .. .. 56 4 0 Other office expenses .. .. 10 0 Teachers' salaries and allowances to South Canterbury Education Board .. 209 5 0 Examinations—Examiners' fees .. 3 3 0 Scholarships .. .. .. 32 10 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 330 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 3 7 0 Other expenditure— High School pupils'fees paid .. 51 0 0 Members' travelling expenses .. 411 6 Exchanges, 3s. 6d.; cheques, 55.; bank interest, 10s. 9d. .. .. 0 19 3 Balance .. .. .. .. 1,480 6 0 £1,801 16 9 J £1,801 16 9 W. Coltman, Chairman. G. H. Gbaham, Secretary. Examined and found correct, except that the rents under existing leases of some of the Board's reserves have been reduced without the authority of law.— J. K. Waeburton, Controller and

Auditor-General. 3. Work of the Highest and Lowest Classes. Highest. —Latin—Via Latina ; Csesarean Prose (Simpson); Caesar, Book II.; Virgil, iEneid, Book IV. English —Nichol's Composition; Higher Grade English; Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Mason's Grammar; Nichol and McCormick's Composition Exercises. French—Macmillan's Second Course, to page 120; Contes dcs fees. Euclid, Books 111. and IV. Algebra, to simultaneous equations and surds. Science —Chemistry. Loivest. —Latin—Via Latina, fifty pages. English—Nichol's Composition ; Higher Grade English; Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Mason's Grammar; Nichol and McCormick's Composition Exercises. French—Macmillan's First Course, to page 32. Euclid, Book I. to Proposition 25. Algebra—Four simple rules and brackets. Science —Chemistry.

WAITAKI HIGH SCHOOL. 1. Ebpoet of the Boaed. During the year Mr. Craddock, first assistant, resigned his position, and Mr. D. A. Watt was appointed pro tempore, so that scholars who were preparing for examination did not suffer from any insufficiency in the teaching staff. During the past year the Governors have taken steps to renovate and ventilate the buildings. The grounds surrounding both schools have been carefully attended to. Geoege E. Hislop, Secretary.

2. General Statement of Accounts for the Year ending 31st December, 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. I Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 427 17 10 By ManagementEndowments— Office salary .. .. .. 60 0 0 Price of reserves sold .. .. CG 7 2 Other office expenses .. .. 10 0 0 Current income from reserves .. 1,301 12 1 Other expenses of management .. 11 4 9 Interest on moneys invested and on Teachers'salaries and allowances .. 1,045 14 0 unpaid purchase-money .. .. 30 4 9 Printing, stationery, and advertising .. 19 19 3 Paid by School Commissioners .. 58 G 8 Cleaning, fuel, light, &o. .. .. B0 G 8 School-fees .. .. .. .. 311 8 8 Books and stationery for sale to pupils, and other temporary advances .. 612 9 Site and buildings, from current revenue— Purchases and new works .. 96 14 3 Rents, insurance, and taxes .. 30 0 6 Interest on Current Account .. .. 62 4 3 f Endowments, Sales Account— Solicitors' fees .. .. .. 23 8 4 Expenses of survey, sales, management, &c. .. .. .. 814 0 Cheque for fees dishonoured .. .. 10 11 0 Fixed deposit .. £125 0 0 Current Account .. .. 106 0 1 Cash banked, Jan. 5, 1897 .. 44 9 8 Deficit lodged, Feb. 18, 1897 .. 525 6 7 March 12, 1897 52 11 3 853 7 7 Unpresented cheques £34 3 4 Petty cash due Secretary .. ..18 16 10 53 0 2 Balance .. .. 800 7 5 £2,245 17 2 £2,245 17 2 Donald Boebie, Chairman. Geoeqe E. Hislop, Secretary. Examined and found correct.— J. K. Warbukton, Controller and Auditor-General.

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Bibliographic details

E-09 EDUCATION: REPORTS OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS. [In continuation of E.-9, 1896.], Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives, 1 January 1897

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E-09 EDUCATION: REPORTS OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS. [In continuation of E.-9, 1896.] Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives, 1 January 1897

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