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Sess. 11.—1897. NEW ZEALAND.

EDUCATION: THE CANTERBURY COLLEGE (PAPERS RELATING TO). [In continuation of E.-7, 1896.]

Presented to both Houses of the General Assembly by Command of His Excellency.

ANNUAL STATEMENT OP THE CHAIRMAN OP THE BOARD OP GOVERNORS. At the annual meeting of the Board of Governors of the Canterbury College, held on Monday, the 31st May, 1897, the Chairman's statement of the progress made and work done in the several departments during the year was read, as follows: —■ The College. Since the last annual meeting of the Board of Governors, held on the 13th July, 1896, when Mr. H. E. Webb was re-elected Chairman, legislation has taken place by which the constitution of the Board has been very considerably altered, and the mode of election placed on a totally different basis to that previously existing. The Canterbury College and Canterbury Agricultural College Bill has been passed, which provides that nineteen members shall form the governing body, to be selected as follows : (1) A group of three to be appointed by the Governor; (2) a group of three to be elected by the members of the Legislative Council and members of the House of Eepresentatives representing electoral districts within the provincial district; (3) a group of six to be elected by such of the graduates of the New Zealand University as for the time being are on the books of the College ; (4) a group of three to be elected by such persons holding certificates of not lower grade than D certificate, under section 45 of "The Education Act, 1877," as for the time being are resident within the Provincial District of Canterbury; (5) a group of three to be elected by the Committees of School Districts within the Provincial District of Canterbury, elected under " The Education Act, 1877 "; (6) one member to be elected by the Professorial Board of the College. During the first period from 1873 to 1884 members of the Board were appointed for life, and vacancies were filled by the Board itself. During the second period, lasting from 1884 to the present time, vacancies on the Board were filled by the votes of the graduates on the books of this College. A new era is now commencing, and the various classes forming the electoral body, as specified above, will return the governing body of the Canterbury College. The ordinary term of office of the members is three years. The newly-constituted Board for the Canterbury Agricultural College, which is now an entirely separate institution, came into force during the month of January, thus terminating a connection that had existed for more than twenty-three years—since July, 1873. The death, after a lingering illness, of Mr. W. H. Spackman has to be reported. The late member had specially interested himself in the affairs of the Public Library, which owes much to his intelligent zeal. Mr. E. de C. Malet, who has been a member since the Bth June, 1876, and for nine years and a half held the position of Chairman of the Board, tendered his resignation in April. Mr. T. W. Stringer has also resigned his seat on the Board. The Eight Eev. the Bishop of Christchurch and Mr. G. G. Stead have obtained leave of absence to proceed to England. During the years that have elapsed since the establishment of the Board death has occasioned many changes in the governing body. The names of the following members occur to us : Bishop Harper; Eevs. Willock, Harris, Buller, Fraser; Hon. W. Eeeves; Drs. Coward and Turnbull; Messrs. Tancred, Hamilton, Colborne-Veel, Inglis, Potts, Gould, Wilkin, Mellish, Lance, and Eoss. Eesignations also have caused many vacancies. Two members only of the original Board now retain their seats. The only change that has occurred in the teaching staff of the College since last July has been that Mr. J. P. Grossmann, M.A., has been appointed to the position of lecturer on political economy.

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The following table shows the number of matriculated and non-matriculated students who have attended lectures since the year 1890 to date : — Matriculated. Non-matriculated. Total. 1890 ... ... ... ... ... 151 116 267 1891 ... ... ... ... ... 172 177 349 1892 ... ... ... ... ... 186 159 345 1893 ... ... ... ... ... 182 158 340 1894 ... ... ... ... ... 185 141 326 1895 ... ... ... ... ... 177 130 307 1896 ... ... ... ... ... 150 66 216 These figures give the number of students attending lectures during the academic year, say from March to November. Previous returns have been reckoned on a different basis, the year having been regarded as ending on the 30th June. The number of students attending each lecture during the last term of 1896 was as follows : — Classics. —Pass Latin: Translation, 29; composition, 44. Greek: Translation, 3; composition, 3. Honours Latin : Translation, 7 ; composition, 6. English Literature. —Pass lectures: Literature (Eeign of Elizabeth), 46; George Eliot and Shakespeare, 41; philology, 39. Honours lectures: Literature (Eeign of Elizabeth), 5; George Eliot and Shakespeare, 5; philology, 9. History. —Pass : (Charles I. to 1688), 25. Honours : (Thirty Years' War), 3 ; constitutional history, 17. Political Economy. —Pass, 32 ; honours, 4. Mathematics. —Pass lectures : Pure mathematics, 22 ; mechanics and hydrostatics, 16. Honours lectures: Section 1., 2; Section 11., 5; Section 111., 1; Section IV., 2; elementary mechanics and hydrostatics, 4. Chemistry and Physics. —Pass chemistry, 9; honours chemistry (organic), 4; chemical physics, 3; pass physics, 13; physics (problems), 2; honours physics, 3; teachers' chemistry, 4; teachers' physics, 3; practical chemistry (junior and pass), 23; practical physics (junior and pass), 16; practical physics and chemistry (honours and research), 1; mineralogy, 4. Geology. —Junior, 3; senior, 2. Biology. —General biology (Part II.), 11; botany (Part II.), 6; pass zoology (Part II.), 2; honours zoology (Part II.), 6 ; laboratory work, 16. French. —Pass lectures : Composition, 33 ; authors, 25; grammar, 24; literature, 25. Honours lectures : Composition, 4; authors, 7 ; essay and literature, 7 ; philology, 12; literature, 5. German. —2. Jurisprudence and Law. —Pass jurisprudence, 16; honours jurisprudence, 7; LL.B. (second section), 5 ; LL.B. (third section), 5. Music. —Eudiments of music and harmony (first-year students), 7; harmony (intermediate second-year students), 14; harmony (intermediate third-year students), 7; harmony (intermediate third-year students, evening class), 3. Successful Students. —Eleven students from the College were this year recorded as having gained honours, viz. : P. Milner gained first-class honours in languages and literature (Latin and English); Misses B. Martin and C. B. Mills, first-class honours in languages and literature (English and French); A. Bell, first-class honours in mathematics ; Miss J. E. Currie, second-class honours iv languages and literature (Latin and English) ; Miss M. E. Lawrell, second-class honours in languages and literature (Greek and French); A. E. Flower, second-class honours in mathematics; T. A. Murphy and A. W. Shrimpton, second-class honours in history and political economy and jurisprudence and constitutional history ; A. G. Henderson and E. L. Mcllroy, third-class honours in languages and literature (Latin and English). The degree of Master of Arts was conferred on the following : Misses M. E. Lawrell, C. B. Mills, J. Mulholland, and M. E. Todhunter, Messrs. A. Bell, A. E. Flower, F. Milner, T. A. Murphy, and A. W. Shrimpton. Fifteen students of the College passed the final examination for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and had the degree conferred upon them—viz., Misses E. Campbell, L. M. Gibson, A. L. Grant, C. S. Howard, E. Low, and M. Walker, and Messrs. W. D. Campbell, A. N. Burns, J. K. H. Inglis, S. C. Owen, H. M. Smyth, J. Sutherland, G. T. Weston, F. J. Wilkes, and F. W. Young; whilst twenty-three were recorded as having passed the first section of their Bachelor of Arts examination— viz., Misses E. M. Allen, E. Collier, M. Demment, E. Enright, F. M. Kirton, M. McEachen, M. G. Newton, M. F. L. Olliver, M. Eawson, F. D. W. Eoss, F. C. Schneider, and K. Scott, and Messrs. C. T. Aschman, J. Caughley, H. Hine, E. F. Johansen, A. P. Lingard, C. W. I. Maclaverty, J. Prendeville, G. Schneider, E. H. Strong, T. B. Strong, and H. O. Stuckey. The degree of Bachelor of Science was conferred on the following : Misses A. E. and C. B. Mills and Messrs. A. E. Craddock and W. A. Eobinson. The degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on Mr. Montfort Trimble, and that of Bachelor of Laws on Messrs. T. A. Murphy, 8.A., A. T. Ngata, 8.A., F. J. Eolleston, 8.A., J. A. Tripe, 8.A., M. Myers, and W. C. H. Wigley. The following were recorded as having passed their respective examinations for the degree of Bachelor of Laws: Third examination, Mr. H. D. Muff; second examination, Messrs. W. Corry and G. T. Weston; first examination, Mr. E. F. Johansen. Mr. W. A. Eobinson, 8.A., was recorded as having passed the whole medical intermediate examination. The first examination for the degree of Bachelor of Music was passed by Miss Jane S. Black. The following students passed their respective examinations for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering: Third examination, T. E. Burt and A. E. Craddock ; second examination, J. E. L. Cull; first examination, J. E. L. Cull, S. H. Jenkinson, and C. N. B. Williams. Of the senior scholarships offered by the University two and a half were gained by students of this College. J. K. H. Inglis gained the scholarship in mathematics, A. E. Craddock that in physical science, and Miss Elsie Low was equal for that in natural science. Mr. Alfred Jolly gained the Bowen prize for 1896 for an essay on " The Present Position and Future Prospects

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of British Eule in Africa." The college exhibitions given for excellence in honours work at the. college annual examination were awarded as follows: For Latin, Miss C. S. Howard ; for mathematics, J. K. H. Inglis; for English, F. J. Wilkes; for French, Misses Eliza Campbell and M. Walker (equal) ; for natural science, Miss E. Low; and for experimental science, W. D. Campbell. The various degrees awarded by the University of New Zealand to students who have been educated at this college are as follows : M.A., 91; 8.A., 140 (some of whom are still eligible to compete for the M.A. degree); LL.D., 1 ; LL.B., 8; B.Sc, 4; B.Sc. in Engineering, 2. Two arts graduates have also obtained the degree of LL.D., eleven that of LL.B., and eleven that of B.Sc. Since the foundation of the University of New Zealand seventy-nine graduates in arts and in science have been awarded first-class honours—forty-five of these belong to Canterbury College—and all six double first-class honours awarded by the University were gained by students from this College. Of the 129 senior and third-year and John Tinline scholarships awarded by the University of New Zealand during the last twenty years — the period during which the present scholarship regulations have been in force—seventy-seven and a half have been awarded to students of Canterbury College. Since 1892 a science scholarship, founded by the Commissioners of the 1851 Exhibition to enable the holder to continue his studies in Europe, has been awarded four times, and on two of these occasions to students of this College. Of the twenty-two Bowen prizes which have been awarded by the University for an essay on a subject connected with English history, and open to all undergraduates of the University of New Zealand, sixteen have been gained by students trained in this College, whilst the only three mentioned as proxime accessit have also been of this College. Biology. —The biological department is now thoroughly equipped and in full working-order. During the present term the following courses of lectures are being delivered: General biology (Part I.), zoology, pass (invertebrata); botany (Part I.), zoology, honours (invertebrata); botany (Part II.), zoology, honours (vertebrata). In connection with all these classes laboratory classes are held. One student obtained a senior scholarship in botany at the last University examination, and is now engaged upon an original research on the anatomy of " Haastia" for the honours degree. Three others have been engaged upon special work in the laboratory outside the regular classes. The number of students keeps satisfactory, and the facilities offered to first-year medical students appear to be appreciated both by students intending to study medicine in the Old Country and by candidates for the medical intermediate examination of the New Zealand University. Music. —At the present date forty-five students are attending the lectures in music, distributed as follows: First year (junior), 13; second year (intermediate), 14; third year (senior), 17; advance, 2 : total, 46. The annual college examinations in music were held in October. There were fifty-eight candidates—junior, 20 ; intermediate, 20 ; senior, 18. For the six years that the lectures have been established the attendance of students has averaged over fifty for each term, and to those who have attended lectures and successfully passed the examinations of the College sixty certificates of merit have been granted. Examinations in music have been held at Timaru and Westport simultaneously with those at the College. Exempted Students. —Examinations for exempted students have been held during the year at Wellington, Wanganui, Napier, and Nelson. College Library. —The library, inclusive of reviews and pamphlets, contains 3,936 volumes. Equatorial Telescope. —Mr. Walter Kitson having kindly consented to take charge of the instrument, visitors are, on certain stated days, permitted access to the telescope. Benefactions. —With increasing requirements and stationary revenue it is a matter of regret that no benefactions to promote the cause of higher education can be recorded. Attached to this report will be found a short historical notice respecting the Canterbury College. School op Engineering. The School of Engineering and Technical Science was established in its present form in 1890. During the seven years it has been in existence the facilities offered for the higher training in engineering have been largely taken advantage of. Since the establishment of the University course in engineering twelve students have entered upon it, two of whom have already taken the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering. That training in a profession having so many opportunities can be obtained at a very moderate cost at Canterbury College is a fact that deserves to be widely known. The following is a list of the apparatus, plant, &c, contained in the department : 950 diagrams; 50-ton testing-machine, with autographic recorder; 2,000 lb. single-lever testingmachine, for cement, wire, and yarn testing ; oil-testers, including lubricating-oil tester, cylinderoil tester, petroleum flashing-point tester ; gauge testers, including dead-weight tester with a check standard gauge, mercurial column, and vacuum gauge; appliances for testing hydraulic gauges; boiler prover; fuel-testing apparatus, including Thompson's calorimeter; 40L.H.P. test boiler; experimental engine ; complete indicating and recording plant for engine-testing; two lathes, drilling- and shaping-machine, with sets of necessary tools; vices and tools for iron- and woodworking. Girls' High School. The older members of the Board will remember that the Girls' High School was originally established in the year 1877 in the building now occupied by the School of Art. It was soon found, however, that the site, consisting of only a quarter of an acre, was too small for the purpose. A larger site, consisting of half an acre, fronting on Cranmer Square, was purchased during the same year, to which in course of time the school was removed. In those days a high school for girls was somewhat in the nature of an experiment, and its progress was watched with interest. The first term ninety pupils attended, and the numbers have fluctuated as follows :—

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First term, 1878 ... ... 115 pupils. First term, 1888 ... ... 115 pupils. 1879 ... ... 89 „ „ 1889 ~. ... 140 „ 1880 ... ... 85 „ „ 1890 ... ... 150 „ 1881 ... ... 87 „ „ 1891 ... ... 152 „ 1882 ... ... 79 „ „ 1892 ... ... 136 „ 1883 ... ... 75 „ „ 1893 ... ... 123 ;, 1884 ... ... 97 „ „ 1894 ... ... 127 „ 1885 ... ... 119 „ „ 1895 ... ... 138 „ 1886 ... ... 132 „ „ 1896 ... ... 133 „ 1887 ... ... 129 „ „ 1897 ... ... 130 „ The following scholarships and exhibitions are awarded annually : Entrance scholarships— Four of the annual value of £15, tenable for two years; four of the annual value of £15, tenable for one year. (In both cases two of the scholarships are offered to girls under thirteen and two to girls under sixteen.) Exhibitions —Four to pupils within the school of the annual value of £15, tenable for one year. Some changes have taken place in the staff of this school. Miss M. Lorimer, one of the senior teachers, was promoted in the third term of last year to the headship of Mount Cook Girls' School, Wellington. In consequence of this the school work has been rearranged; a junior teacher, Miss Kathleen Gresson, 8.A., appointed, and also an additional mistress for drawing and subjects connected therewith. Miss Helen Gibson, the newly-appointed art mistress, will enter upon the duties at the beginning of the June term of the present year, and it is expected that great advantage will result to the school from the appointment of a specialist in art. The drawing-classes will be directed by Miss Gibson, and additional classes of other kinds will be formed to suit the pupil's requirements as far as the circumstances of the school will permit. The appointment of a janitress at the beginning of 1896 has proved most successful. The effect on the discipline of the school has been altogether a beneficial one. A new gas-stove has been obtained for the cooking-school, and the room has been fitted with new ventilators. These improvements are working very satisfactorily. The buildings and grounds of the school are well adapted to their purposes; the class-rooms are lofty, well ventilated, and thoroughly warmed by hot-air pipes in winter. The playground is pleasant, well shaded by lofty trees, and quite secluded from public view; there is also a comfortable, well-warmed luncheon-room for the girls who remain at school during the mid-day interval. All buildings and fences are in good repair. The school has been successful during the past year in winning scholarships and other honours. At the beginning of the present year Junior University Scholarships were offered to two of our pupils, Euth Gibson and Mabel Connon, but were not accepted, as the youth of the girls made it desirable that they should remain for at least another year at school before proceeding to the University. Of the six senior scholarships of North Canterbury the Girls' High School won three, taking first, third, and fourth places on the list. Ten girls passed the matriculation examination, one of them taking a good place on the junior scholarship honours list, and one passed the Junior Civil Service examination. The number of scholars in the school in the first term of 1897 was 130. In addition to the usual subjects taught in high schools, considerable attention is given to manual and technical instruction. A class for cooking is held at the school on every Saturday of term in a building belonging to the school, and situated on its grounds, fitted up as a kitchen for this purpose. The class is divided into parts, the first beginning at 8 a.m., and each division receives two hours' instruction. A class for dress-cutting is held also on Saturday at the same time as the cooking-class, in a room at the school arranged for the purpose. Ordinary needlework is taught on two afternoons of the regular school week by the permanent teachers of the school. Boys' High School. In July, 1877, the Board decided to recommend the Government to establish schools throughout the colony of such a character as to form a link between the primary schools and the University. In the following year an acre of land was purchased, and in 1879 a tender accepted for the building of the Boys' High School. In consequence of increasing numbers it was found necessary to add to the buildings both in the year 1891 and 1895. The accompanying table will show the gradual advance of the school: — The school was opened in May, 1881, with an attendance of eighty-three boys. The number of pupils attending during the first term of each successive year is as follows: — 1882 ... ... ... 114 1890 ... ... ... 135 1883 ... ... ... 139 1891 ... ... . . 149 1884 112 1892 165 1885 ... ... ... 91 1893 ... ... ... 188 1886 ... .. ... 77 1894 ... ... ... 240 1887 ... ... ... 69 1895 ... .. ... 247 1888 ... ... ... 108 1896 ... ... ... 253 1889 ... ... ... 115 1897 ... ... ... 264 The staff comprises the headmaster, ten full-time assistant masters, one part-time master, and visiting masters in drill, swimming, singing, model-drawing, and carpentry. This with 264 boys on the roll as for first term, 1897, gives a somewhat high average of pupils per master. Gymnastic apparatus has been fitted up in a. large room called the orderly-room (used also for cadets), and large voluntary classes are held in it daily under the direction of a master. New outbuildings, comprising urinals, &c, were also erected in October, 1896. At the recent December examinations M. Keane obtained, the first place among the fifteen elected to Junior University Scholarships, being 376 marks above the next on the list. E. E. Hall, H. S. Cordery, and E. H. B. Milsom obtained good places on the "credit " list of the same examination. M. Keane was also elected to

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a Gammack scholarship, and resigned his University scholarship to hold it. E. E. Hall was elected to the other Gammack scholarship, which was vacant by resignation. W. J. C. Wilson, W. Simpson, and W. Chrystall passed the medical preliminary examination. Fifteen boys matriculated—J. G. Lancaster, J. F. H. Carpenter, W. F. Alexander, and F. D. Banks won senior scholarships given by the North Canterbury Board of Education. E. E. Hall, H. S. Cordery, and J. W. Harvey obtained, respectively the third, eleventh, and nineteenth (equal) places in the Junior Civil Service examination. Among old pupils A. G. Henderson and E. L. Mcllroy obtained their M.A. degree with third-class honours, and T. A. Murphy with second-class honours. A. E. Craddoek won the Senior University Scholarship for physical science. A. Muir was placed first among those said to have passed the Senior Civil Service examination with distinction. As regards the staff, Mr. T. W. Cane has been made a full-time master. There were thirty-eight free boys attending the school during the first term of 1897, in addition to thirteen Board scholars, who receive their scholarships from the North Canterbury Board of Education. The free boys will in future be composed— (a) Of boys who come next in order to the winners of the scholarships given by the North Canterbury Board of Education, and who obtain at least half-marks, five of whom will be elected every year with exhibitions tenable for three years ; (b) of boys elected at the school first term entrance examination, four of whom will be elected every year, with exhibitions tenable for two years ; (c) of eight boys elected for one year from among those already in the school, and called "Foundation exhibitioners." (a) and (b) are called respectively "Governors' exhibitioners" and " Entrance exhibitioners." In addition to these, special boys are from time to time "continued on " free for one year. There were four such boys in the first term of 1897. In 1896 there were no entrance exhibitioners, but there were eight Governors' exhibitions (each tenable for three years); henceforth there will be five such Governors' exhibitions, and four entrance exhibitions (each tenable for two years). Manual and Technical Instruction. —There is a suitable workshop, fitted with excellent lathes, joiners' benches, and tools, in which instruction is given in carpentering, the use of tools, &c, out of school hours. The fee is 2s. 6d. per term, and covers instruction for two hours per week. During part of the time boys do work that the instructor may require, during the rest of the time they are allowed to make articles for themselves, which may, with the approval of the instructor, be taken home. The cost of timber where appreciable must be paid, and any work may be reserved for exhibition. Boys must purchase certain necessary tools or hire them at Is. per term. Mr. S. H. Seager supervises the workshop and carries out a regular course of instruction. In addition to this there is a modern form, where boys, instead of Latin, learn sloyd and shorthand. Sloyd comprises the making of models in cardboard, wood, iron, &c, of drawings previously made to scale. Apart from this, in the general school 134 boys were taught drawing, first term, 1897, of whom 93 learnt geometrical drawing; 151 boys learnt chemistry, first term, 1897; and 121 boys physics. It will thus be seen that with complete arrangements for drawing and science boys obtain instruction in the main principles underlying technical education, and they have the essential elements of manual work in carpentry and sloyd. Elementary sloyd is taught to the youngest boys in place of French, and modelling is about to be introduced. For science teaching the school possesses two well-equipped laboratories, with sinks, sets of reagents, furnace, &c. There is also a lecture-room with properly equipped lecturing table, containing sink, gas, water-tap, &c. The room has raised benches, and can accommodate sixty to write and over a hundred for oral instruction. For modeldrawing boys go to the School of Art. There is a dark room also close to the new laboratory for photography. Museum. How in the year 1873 the Museum was placed under the administration of the Board, and how the collections gradually from small beginnings increased under the anxious care of the late Sir Julius yon flaast, are matters of history. The usual report of the Curator is presented herewith. School op Art. The present building was originally erected in the year 1877 for the purpose of being used as a Girls' High School ; subsequently it was arranged to establish therein the School of Art, and to remove the Girls' High School to a more commodious site. In 1893 it was found necessary to add two more class-rooms. The table annexed will show the number of students in attendance at the school during the first term of each year, since its opening in 1882 : — Morning Evening Saturday Morning Evening Saturday Class. Class. Class. Class. Class. Class 1882 ... ... 28 63 Nil. 1890 ... 28 69 Nil.' 1883 ... ... 45 67 „ 1891 ... 30 75 66 1884 ... ... 51 49 „ 1892 ... 31 69 81 1885 ... ... 28 62 „ 1893 . ... 28 85 80 1886 ... ... 19 51 „ 1894 ... 32 115 95 1887 ... ... 18 58 „ 1895 ... 38 102 75 1888 ... ... 21 60 „ 1896 ... 38 98 77 1889 ... ... 31 75 „ 1897 ... 32 101 97 During the present year correspondence has taken place between the Board and the Department of Education with a view to obtaining financial assistance for the school, under " The Manual and Technical Elementary Instruction Act, 1895." The report of the Art Master is attached.

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Public Library. For the information of those interested in this department a short account is attached, as an appendix to this report, setting out the early history of the institution since its establishment as a Mechanics' Institute in the year 1859, and its transfer to the Board of Governors in the year 1873. Beference Department. —A tender for the erection of a gallery at a cost of £249 has been accepted. The work is now well advanced, and its completion may be looked for in five or six weeks. Much-needed additional space for books will thus be provided. In the meantime during the progress of the alterations it has been necessary to close the room to visitors. The new catalogue has been in the hands of the printer for some months. The contractors are making good progress, but it is anticipated that the end of the year will have arrived before the volume is ready for issue. The Quarterly Bevieiv has been added to the magazines placed on the table, making the total number in this department eighteen. Since July, 1896, 481 new volumes have been added, making the total number of books 10,178. The thanks of the Board have been given to various donors of fifty books and pamphlets. It is satisfactory to note that no instances have occurred, so far as has been ascertained, during the year of the mutilation or theft of books in this department. Circulating Department. —ln July of last year the Chairman, in his annual statement, reported a very valuable bequest to this department under the will of the late Mr. James Gammack, of Springston, who died in May, 1896. The trustees of the estate have not as yet found themselves in a position to make any payment towards the support of this department. This portion of the institution was closed for the annual stock-taking from the 4th to the 9th January. As a result it was found that only eighteen volumes were finally unaccounted for. The alterations now proceeding have permitted of an extra book-case being available, and other extra shelving has been provided, making space for about two thousand volumes. Printed catalogues are issued every six months, and have been completed to 31st December last. The Windsor Magazine and Black and White have been added to the already large number of magazines and newspapers subscribed for. The total in single copies amount to thirty-six ; in some cases, however, three and four copies of the most popular are ordered; 164 volumes have been taken off the shelves as being no longer fit for use. The total number of volumes in this department is 16,842. The subscribers now number 1,570. Beading-room. —This department was closed from the 4th to the 9th January. The walls were distempered and the woodwork painted. The room is much too small to fully meet the growing wants of the community. The following newspapers are filed : English, 6 ; Irish, 1 ; Scotch, 1; American, 1; Australian Colonies, 9 ; New Zealand, about 40; 15 magazines are placed monthly on the tables, School of Agriculture. Members are aware that the School of Agriculture has been under the control of the Board of Governors since the endowment was set aside in July, 1873. During that month the Chairman, Mr. Joshua Strange Williams, reported that over 100,000 acres of Crown lands comprised the endowment of the school. One of the earliest proposals in the direction of carrying out the objects for which the reserve has been intrusted to the Board was to take steps to establish an agricultural school and experimental farm. Offers were invited from persons willing to sell land for farming purposes, the object being to obtain a variety of soils, from light and even shingly land to the richest swamp. It was proposed to give lectures on agricultural chemistry, natural history, including botany and animal physiology, geology, veterinary surgery, land-surveying, architectural and mechanical drawing, and other sciences directly connected with agriculture. In this connection it may be mentioned that the first professorial chair established by the Board of Governors was a chair of chemistry. This action was taken with a view to make provision for the teaching, amongst other subjects, of agricultural chemistry. In March, 1878, Mr. W. E. Ivey was appointed to take charge of the institution. The director ably discharged the varied duties of his office until his death in April, 1892. The Board recorded its high appreciation of the services rendered by him to the college and to the colony. Attached to this report will be found a summary of the work done, together with a statement of the receipts and expenditure for the year ending the 31st December last. After this date the administration of the institution was taken over by the new governing body, as laid down under " The Canterbury College and Canterbury Agricultural College Act, 1896." All the endowments belonging to the School of Agriculture are now vested in the corporation of the Canterbury Agricultural College. Any question arising w T ith respect to these and any properties will be decided by the Supreme Court. The further question as to a sum of £7,954, alluded to in the report of the Eoyal Commission on the School of Agriculture, dated 28th February, 1889, is also referred to the decision of the same authority. The valuation of live-stock, grain, implements, &c, taken over by the new management as at 31st December, 1896, amounted to £4,986 13s. 9d. The area of the farm at Lincoln has been gradually increased from time to time, as circumstances permitted. Purchases were completed at the following periods : — A. E. P. September and October, 1877 ... ... ... ... 83 0 0 April and July, 1878 ... ... ... ... ... 171 2 38| August and November, 1879 ... ... ... ... ... 247 2 0 - July, 1881 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 160 0 0 January, 1896 ... ... ... ... ■ ... ... 50 0 0 Total acreage ... ... ... ... 712 0 38| School op Engineering and Technical Science. The professor in charge reported : — " At the University examinations of 1896 five candidates sat for examination, all of whom passed in their respective years. The record of the department has thus been preserved intact, no student having as yet failed in a technical subject at any University examination. At the annual

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College examinations certificates were obtained in the following subjects by students of the Technical School: In freehand mechanical drawing, two first- and nine second-class certificates. In mechanical drawing four students obtained first-class and one a second-class certificate. In elementary mechanical drawing four students obtained first-class and two second-class certificates. In descriptive geometry and setting-out of work ten students obtained first-class and five second-class certificates. One first-class and four second-class certificates were granted in elementary steam, one second-class in the steam-engine (advanced), one second-class certificate in applied mechanics, and one first- and one second-class in mechanics of machinery. Thirteen students passed in Division I. in freehand mechanical drawing, and twelve passed in elementary geometry. There has been a further large increase in the attendances, there now being eighty-seven names on the books, and 426 hour-attendances per week. The steady rate of increase is shown by the following table, which gives the number of students during the first term of each year since the foundation of the school:— Year. 1890. 1891. 1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. Number of students ... 40 58 55 53 51 61 77 87 N rctpt h rek ttend l 219 254 308 391 426 Up to the present time 280 students have attended at the school, and 201 certificates have been granted in the various subjects; and a large proportoin of the holders of these certificates have obtained extremely satisfactory positions. lam still of opinion that much could be done by the extension of the scope of the school in the directions indicated in my last annual report. During the year tests have been conducted at the Engineering Laboratory for the Government and private individuals and firms on plates, timbers, oils, cements, and concretes.—Eobt. J. Scott, M.1.M.E., A.M.1.C.E., M.S.A.E., &c, Professor of Engineering." Museum. ~~ : • ■ ■ The curator reported : — " Towards the close of 1896 steps were taken to make the Museum more secure by adding three strong folding inside doors, and placing iron bars over the windows that look out to the back. The skylights of the ethnological and New Zealand rooms were painted on the outside, and the lead was repaired on the main staircase. Steady progress has been made in printing labels. The coins have been finished, the Maori skulls and New Zealand timbers have been relabelled, and the collection of birds has been proceeded with. Although the additions to the collections have not been so numerous or so valuable as they were last year, still we have obtained several important acquisitions by means of exchange. They are as follows : — " Geological Booms. —Bones of the gigantic fossil emus, from South Australia. " Natural History Booms. —Skin of the Australian eared seal; skeleton of La Plata porpoise and several bird skeletons, including an adult and young rhea, a crested screamer, and a penguin. All the mammal stands have also been newly painted. " Antiquity Boom. —A suit of armour, made towards the end of the sixteenth century, and several old swords and rapiers. These have all been placed in a new case. An old English leather bottle and tinder-box, and the cast of an Aztec statuette, the latter being presented by Dr. Hocken. "Ethnological Boom. —A raised map of part of the North American Continent and the Atlantic Ocean. An old Persian saddle and other Syrian objects. Sixteen old Japanese wooden figures. A collection of village pottery from New Mexico, and a collection from Samoa, including a canoe and a complete set of tattooing instruments. " New Zealand Boom. —Skin and skeleton of Apteryx laivryi, from Stewart Island. The arm and hand of a humpback whale. The skeletons of a number of small birds, and of a dolphin obtained from Governor's Bay, and presented by Mr. W. H. Teape; and some North Island moa-bones presented by Mr. H. Hill. "Herbarium. —The New Zealand herbarium has been rearranged and more space allotted to it. A number of mosses have been presented by Mr. E. Brown, and the whole collections of mosses and seaweeds have been mounted. " Library. —Presentations of publications have been received from the British Museum of Natural History, the British Association, the La Plata Museum, the Harvard University Museum, the Brussels Museum, the United States Geological Survey and Agricultural Department, the Smithsonian Institution, the Eoyal Society of Victoria, and the Polynesian Society. The Victorian Government has also presented a copy of Sir F. McCoy's Prodromus of the Zoology of Victoria. " An arm-chair, formerly belonging to Mr. E. Gibbon Wakefield, has been presented by Sir John Hall, and placed in the library. —F. W. Hutton, Curator." School op Art. The Art Master reported on the work for the year 1896 as follows: — " As regards the attendance of students and the result of the work the past year has been one of the most successful in the history of the school. "Morning Class. —This class has again made a further advance. Compared with the two previous years the numbers are as follows : —■ First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 1894 ... ... ... ... ... 32 35 32 1895 ... ... ... ... ... 38 32 38 1896 ... ... ... ... ... 38 34 37 In 1887, the year in which I took the headmastership of the school, the numbers were : First term, 18; second term, 9; third term, 17.

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" The work has been based on the same principles as during the last three or four years—viz., division into four branches. In the first, or elementary, stress is laid more particularly on the study of form by means of outline, both pencil and brush being employed for this purpose. In the next two gradually the study of tone and colour is introduced combined with form; and in the fourth more advanced work is given from the cast, still life, and life. Various modes of expression are employed, the point, ' stump,' and brush, both in water-colour and oil-colour, being used for representing objects on aflat surface, whilst the modelling tool and fingers are mainly used for representation in concrete form. The medium in and with which he shall work is largely left to a student's own choice, as it is found that a preference is soon shown for that one in which by nature he is best fitted to excel. For instance, a student whose object it is to prepare himself for illustration work naturally chooses the point, both pen and pencil, and also occasionally the water-colour brush. The modelling class, under Mr. Kidson, has been held on Wednesdays from 11.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The work so far has been of an elementary nature, the copies being simple casts of ornament and portions of the figure. The class for painting landscapes from nature, under Mr. Walsh, has gone out every Tuesday during the first and third terms, while Miss Munnings has had charge of an elementary class in the same subject, going out on the same day as the others. Life classes, for the study of the draped model, have been held on Mondays and Fridays from 10 to 1, and for the study of the nude on Thursday. These have been under the charge of the headmaster, and have been more largely attended than ever before, excellent work having been produced both in black and white and colour. Entrance into the life classes is by competition, held at the end of every term. As only an average of two can be admitted each term, the competition is severe, and, considering this, the result is very satisfactory and encouraging. The faculty for memorising forms, as well as the imitative faculty, has been cultivated with good results. The benefit of this system is beginning to show itself in the more advanced work. A series of drawings was shown in the annual exhibition illustrating the extent to which memory drawing can be carried. " Evening Class. —Compared with the two previous years the numbers attending have been as follows :— First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 1894 ... ... ... ... ... 115 108 93 1895 ... ... ... ... ... 102 105 102 1896 ... ... ... ... 98 98 104 "In 1887 the numbers were as follows: First term, 58; second term, 73 ; third term, 72. " The students in this class are mainly drawn from trades and industries associated in anyway with art, and so the instruction is more specially arranged to meet the wants of these. Besides elementary drawing it has comprised architecture, decorative design, modelling from the cast and from life, light and shade from the cast and still life, and drawing and painting from the human figure both nude and draped. Although the attendance of the night class of students is much more satisfactory and encouraging than formerly, there is still much to be desired in this respect, and until the employers more effectively co-operate in securing the attendance of their apprentices by realising the benefit accruing to themselves as well as to the community in general by the increased skill and taste of the workman we fear that the influence such an institution as the School of Art should exert on the industrial well-being of the district will not be w 7 hat it might and should. Whilst referring generally to the work of this class I would again emphasize the necessity for a students' technical museum of objects of industrial art. The progress of the students is being severely retarded for lack of this ; for, after a student has gone through a certain amount of training and learnt the principles applicable to all design, the best means of developing his further education is by surrounding him with examples showing how these principles have been applied by various peoples and at various times. Life classes have been held on Mondays and Fridays for the study of the draped model, and on Wednesdays for the nude. These, similarly to the morning, have been attended by a larger number than at any former period, and the results have also been better and of a more advanced character. Students deserving mention are S. L. Thompson for having gained first place and the free studentship in drawing and painting from the life, and C. Brassington for his admirable set of bas-reliefs and marble bust from life, W. Thompson for some good decorative designs founded on native flora, and G. Hart for architectural drawing. The two latter reflect great credit upon their teacher, Mr. S. Hurst Seager. " The class for modelling in clay has been held on Mondays, and has been attended by an average of about twenty students, under the charge of Mr. Kidson. Good progress was visible, and a larger and better display was made at the annual exhibition than at any previous time. " Saturday Students. —The teachers and pupil-teachers under the North Canterbury Board of Education have attended on Saturday mornings from 9.30 to 12.30, and have been taught freehand, model, geometry, perspective, drawing on the black-board from memory and elementary light and shade. Two of them have this year completed their full second-grade certificate—viz., T. Doudsand I. Newton. Compared with the two previous years the numbers have been as follows :— First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 1894 ... ... ... ... ... 95 86 98 1895 ... ... ■ ... ... ... 75 79 84 1896 ... ... ... ... ... 77 ■ 100 106 " Wood-carving and Sloyd.— -The classes for wood-carving and sloyd have been held under Mr. Hurst Seager, from 10 to 11.30 and 11.30 to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. They are increasing in attendance and interest, especially in the former one, where there are now this term fifteen students. "Boys' High School. —The boys from the High School have attended in two divisions, the junior on Mondays from 3.20 to 4, and the senior on Thursdays at the same time. Both have been taught model-drawing.

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" Free Studentships. —The six free studentships offered by the Board for annual competition on the past year's work were won by the following students : Landscape from nature, A. McLean ; painting from still life, M. H. Aitken; painting from life (colour), S. L. Thompson; drawing from life (monochrome), S. L. Thompson; drawing from the antique, S. L. Thompson; architectural work, G. Hart. The annual free studentships offered to the head boy in drawing in each of ten district State schools were competed for and awarded in February. No prizes were given this year by the Board, owing to necessity for economy. Two were given privately. Owing to this there was no prize distribution as in former years. " Industrial Association Scholarships. —The Canterbury Industrial Association has decided to devote the interest accruing from the Government grant of £500 for the Industrial Exhibition to the founding of scholarships, tenable at the School of Art, for apprentices in certain industries associated with and founded on art. We have been for years past impressing the necessity for a closer connection between the art trades and the school founded on their mutual dependence for wellbeing and advancement, and this is the first direct recognition of this principle, a principle long ago recognised and acted on in older countries. The Industrial Association, as well as the Board of Governors and the community generally, are to be congratulated on the step now being taken. Arrangements are being made as to the conditions under which these shall be awarded and held, and the first competition will probably take place at the end of this year. " Affiliation with South Kensington, London. —The school has now become affiliated with South Kensington for the purposes of examination and competition for prizes. Students will thus now have the opportunity of gaining South Kensington certificates, which are recognised the world over, whereas our own local ones are only recognised locally. We have hesitated hitherto taking this step, as there is a danger in the anxiety to obtain awards of students being compelled to work in certain grooves, which is detrimental to individual development and freedom of individual experiment. If this freedom for experiment and work could be arranged for and allowed, then the advantage of affiliation would be entirely without drawback. " Annual Examinations. —The annual examinations were held in December, with results as already published. One student, Miss H. Gibson, has successfully completed her art class teacher's certificate, this being the first one awarded since the new regulations in 1894. One student, W. Thompson, has completed the work for the first year decorative design, and several have only one or two subjects to pass before completing both the first and second years' architecture and decorative design. "Annual Exhibition. —The annual exhibition of students' works, held in February, was one of the most successful we have ever had, both as to quality of work and the number of exhibits, the life and still-life work and modelling in clay showing out especially well. At the request of a large number of people it was kept open for two days longer than usual, being open for a week altogether. Instead of holding the usual prize distribution the exhibition was this year opened publicly by the Chairman of the Board, Mr. H. E. Webb, addresses being given by Mr. J. E. Triggs, the President of the Industrial Association, Messrs. T. S. Weston, a member of the Board, and F. Waymouth, Mayor of St. Albans. The headmaster gave a report on the past year's work. " Judges and Examiners. —The following gentlemen kindly acted as judges and examiners in the various competitions and examinations : Mr. Woodhouse, Sydney, in decorative design, Mr. Mountfort in architecture and perspective, and Mr. J. Gibb in drawing and painting. " The past year has been one of the most successful in the history of the school, and this has been largely due to the efficient help rendered by my staff. After serving the Board for the last six years, Miss Munnings is, at the end of this term, severing her connection with the school. Praise is due to her for the efficient way in which she has always discharged her duties, and her loss will be appreciably felt. It has been decided to appoint two assistants in her place. Thanks to the liberality of the Board, the school is now in thorough repair, having been repainted and distempered throughout, in addition to various improvements having been effected.—G. H. Elliott, Art Master." School op Agriculture. Eeport of the Director of the School of Agriculture, Lincoln, for six months ending the 31st December, 1896 :— " School. —The number of students for the second term, 1896, was forty-three. The cost of maintenance for the half-year ending the 31st December was £19 ss. sd. Seven students gained the diploma of the college—William George Andrews, Ghristchurch ; Frederick Charles Gabites, Timaru ; Eupert Vivian Hosking, Masterton; George Leheup Marshall, Wanganui; George Matthews, Springston; John Christopher Eolleston, Eangitata ; Douglas George Wright, Winslow. Annual certificates have been gained by E. V. Hosking, first in agriculture, mechanics, and veterinary science ; W. G. Andrews, first in agricultural chemistry, practical chemistry, theoretical botany, practical botany, and mechanics ; G. L. Marshall, first in agricultural chemistry, economic entomology, and veterinary science; D. G. Wright, first in general chemistry, book-keeping, farm-books, and surveying. Annual certificates have been gained by the following first-year students :W. Manning, first in agriculture, book-keeping, and farm-books ; H. Small, first in agricultural chemistry, practical chemistry, entomology, and theoretical botany; N. Kirkcaldie, first in agricultural chemistry, physiography, practical botany, meteorology, and book-keeping ; V. M. Hutton, first in general chemistry and plotting ; N. M. Duncan, first in mensuration ; W. C. Pettit, first in veterinary science, Two appointments have been made to the teaching staff, Mr. C. O. Lillie (Dunedin) being now in charge of the natural science department, and Mr. C. Coleridge Farr (of St. Paul's College, Sydney) being in charge of the mathematical department, in place of Mr. Adams, resigned. Messrs. Gray and Chariton are in charge of the chemistry and veterinary departments respectively.

2—E. 7.

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" Farm. —-The farm is in good order, but the fences, owing to the gorse dying, are somewhat ragged in appearance. The autumn cereals look well, and promise an abundant harvest; the spring-sown cereals are somewhat stunted, and betoken a poor result. The area in cereals comprises 93 acres wheat, 68 acres oats, and 12 acres barley. About sixty different kinds of wheat are being grown for experimental purposes. The root-crops are all sown, and the mangels and carrots look exceedingly well. About thirty-two kinds of potatoes are planted. The experiments with mangels and carrots consist of the different sorts of these roots grown with the same manure. There are 9 acres of experimental clovers, and the other crops of the year's rotation consist of 11 acres beans, 11 acres peas, 15 acres rape, and about 45 acres turnips. With the turnips the experiments are— (a) Same kind of turnip with different manures ; (b) same kind of manure with different kinds of turnips. The live-stock are looking well, but should the drought continue the younger ones will undoubtedly suffer, as the grass is fast disappearing. The breeds of sheep are as in my report for the 30th June, and comprise Border Leicesters, English Leicesters, Shropshires, Eomney Marsh, and Lincoln. Two draught horses have been bought to take the place of older ones. No additions have been made to the cattle, sheep, or pigs since the 30th June, though two Jersey heifers and two Hereford heifers for educational purposes have already been bought, and will soon be sent to the College farm. The dairy plant is as at the 30th June ;so also the farm plant, excepting a reaper-and-binder and a grass-mower, which have been procured. The numbers of stock on the 31st December stand as follows : Sheep, 1,292 ; cattle, 81 ; horses, 20 ; pigs, 79. The valuation of stock and plant was made as at the 31st December by Messrs. Boag, McMillan, and Overton, and the schedule accompanying this report gives the exact inventory and valuation of same as made by these gentlemen. The Board of Advice has held its monthly meetings, and to it and your Board I would desire to express my best thanks for the deep interest taken in all matters connected with the working of the institution and management of the farm.—John Bayne, Director."

APPENDICES.

APPENDIX I. , ■ Historical Notice. Canterbury College was created by an ordinance of the Provincial Council of Canterbury passed in the year 1873. Before that time a body called the Canterbury Collegiate Union had been in existence, which had given instruction in classics, mathematics, modern languages, and certain branches of science, and one of the objects for which the College was incorporated was the carryingon of the work which had been begun by the Collegiate Union. The Otago University had been created by a Provincial Ordinance of the Province of Otago of the year 1869, and in the year 1870 professors had been appointed and University teaching had been begun. The University Act of 1870 had also originated the University of New Zealand, conferring on it powers to grant degrees in arts, law, medicine, and music, but the University had no direct means of teaching. Negotiations between the Otago University and Canterbury College in 1873 led to the passing of "The New Zealand University Act, 1874," constituting that body an examining body solely, and to the affiliation to it of the Otago University and Canterbury College. The government of Canterbury College was vested in a Board of Governors, consisting of twenty-three members, who were named in clause 4 of the Canterbury College Ordinance. They were appointed for life, and vacancies which occurred in the Board were at first filled up by the Board itself. It was provided, however, by clause 18 of the ordinance that when the number of graduates of the University of New Zealand who were members of the College should reach thirty the graduates should fill up vacancies in the Board of Governors. Under this clause the graduates have filled up all the vacancies which have occurred since June, 1884. The preamble of " The Canterbury College Ordinance, 1873," sets out the object for which the College was established—viz., for enabling all classes and denominations of Her Majesty's subjects resident in the Province of Canterbury and elsewhere in the Colony of New Zealand to pursue a regular and liberal course of education. With this object three professors were appointed in England in the year 1874, whose duties were to teach in Canterbury College the subjects of classics and English, mathematics and natural philosophy, physics and chemistry. The professors appointed began their work in Christchurch in the year 1875, and the lecturers in modern languages, biology, and jurisprudence who had been working under the Collegiate Union became lecturers on the staff of the newly-established College. There were at first no College buildings; the lectures were held in two rooms belonging to the Public Library, and in a small hall at some distance, to which was attached the chemical laboratory. The Provincial Council,- however, voted various amounts of money for the purchase of a site and the erection of buildings. These were

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begun in 1876, and that portion which includes the board-room, the offices, and the mathematical and the English lecture-room was opened in June, 1877; the iron building, in which are the chemical and physical laboratories and lecture-rooms, was finished about the same time. Shortly afterwards the set of lecture-rooms to the left of the main entrance was added, then the hall, then the classical lecture-room, then the wing in which is the School of Engineering. Finally, the building was erected which includes the biological laboratory and lecture-rooms, and the tower for the reception of the telescope which had been presented to the College by Mr. James Townsend. These buildings were opened for use in March, 1896. In 1877 the staff of the College was strengthened by the appointment of Sir Julius yon Haast as Professor of Palaaontology and Geology. After his death these subjects were attached to the chair of biology, and this arrangement continued till 1893, when Captain Hutton, who had occupied this chair, resigned it to take the Curatorship of the Museum. Along with this latter office Captain Hutton accepted the lectureship in geology and palaeontology. When this arrangement was made the teaching of biology was provided for by the appointment of a lecturer, and the lectureship has since been made into a professorship. During the year 1879 the chair of classics and English was divided. Professor J. M. Brown, who up to that time had held the combined chair, elected to take the subject of English, to which was added history, and a new chair of classics was created. In the year 1890 arrangements were made for placing the teaching of modern languages on a more permanent basis, and eventually a professorship of French and German was created. The School of Engineering and Technical Science was established on its present basis in 1890. Before that time certain evening lectures had been given on engineering subjects, but in that year a permanent lecturer (afterwards created professor) was appointed, and a complete course of work sketched out. Before long the University of New Zealand took the matter in hand, and arranged to give the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering to those students who completed a certain course, which includes both theoretical knowledge and practical work. Attached to the School of Engineering there is a properly-equipped engineering laboratory, containing, amongst other things, an experimental steam-engine and a machine of the latest pattern for testing the strength of materials. The following institutions have come under the control of the Board of Governors or have been established by the Board on the dates specified: The Literary Institute was taken over on the 31st December, 1873, under the provisions of " The Canterbury Museum and Library Ordinance, 1870," and afterwards was known as the Public Library, an institution comprising a reference library, a circulating library, and reading-room. ( The Canterbury Museum and Library Ordinance Amendment Ordinance was passed in 1873.) The management of the Canterbury Museum was handed over to the Board in June, 1874. The Girls' High School was opened on the 13th September, 1877. The School of Agriculture was opened on the 19th July, 1880. The Boys' High School was opened on the 18th May, 1881. The School of Art was opened on the Ist March, 1882.

APPENDIX 11. The Public Library. Members of the Board may perhaps require to be reminded that the first action taken in the direction of providing a reading-room and library in Christchurch was at a public meeting, held at the Oddfellows' Hall, Lichfield Street, on the 26th May, 1859, to take into consideration the best means of establishing a mechanics' institute. At a subsequent meeting, held on the 9th June, 1859, trustees and officers were appointed, together with a committee. Certain rules were adopted for the working of the institution, and the committee was instructed to secure a site and building as soon as possible. The institute was formally opened on the 4th August, 1859. In the original plan of the city as laid out by the founders of the province a valuable site had been reserved for the purpose of a mechanics' institute. A petition was presented to his Honour the Superintendent praying for a site of ground upon which to erect a building for the use of the institute. The Provincial Government, on the 29th May, 1861, agreed to offer a sum of money in lieu of a site for the institute. The committee of the institute purchased half an acre of land, being Sections Nos. 405 and 406, on the east side of the Eiver Avon, fronting on Hereford Street and Cambridge Terrace, for the sum of £262 10s. The committee recommended that funds for a building should be raised by shares and subscriptions, the amount of the shares to be £5. Subsequently, on 10th December, 1862, the funds at the disposal of the committee were reported to be as follows : 130 shares, subscribed, at £5, £650; Government grant, £500: total, £1,150. Out of this amout about £265 had been paid for the building-site, leaving a balance of £885. A recommendation was made that the sum of £800 be expended in finishing a portion of the main building, sufficient for immediate use. Eventually a tender was accepted at a total cost of £1,169. In February, 1868, the name of the institution was changed to that of the Christchurch Literary Institute. On the 30th July, 1873, the committee of the institute met the library committee of the Board of Governors of Canterbury College. It was resolved that application be made to the Superintendent to introduce and carry through the House of Assembly a Bill giving powers to the committee of the Literary Institute to transfer the property of the institute to the Superintendent of the Province of Canterbury for the purposes of a public circulating library and reading-room. On the sth December, 1873, the trustees of the Christchurch Literary Institute conveyed the halfacre of land at the corner of Hereford Street and Cambridge Terrace, with all buildings thereon, together with the books, furniture, chattels, and effects, to the Superintendent of Canterbury, " upon trust for the purpose of a public library, to be established and maintained under and in

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pursuance of the provisions of ' The Canterbury Museum and Library Ordinance, 1870,' subject, nevertheless, to the conditions expressed of and concerning the same —that is to say, that a reading-room and circulating library of at least equal dimensions, both as regards space and number of books and periodicals, to those conveyed and assigned shall be constantly maintained in the said buildings, or in any new buildings to be erected upon the said land in the place of the existing buildings, and that such books and periodicals shall from time to time be supplemented and increased so as to satisfy future requirements, and generally the institution maintained in accordance with the usual and recognised standard of a public circulating library and reading-room : Provided always that the Superintendent and his successors, or other the acting trustees of the institution, continue to exercise the discretion enjoyed by the present management of determining upon the books which shall be retained solely for reference; and that the advantages of such reading-room shall be opened to the public free of charge, and that the advantages of the circulating library shall be opened to the public either free of charge, at the discretion of the management, or at charges not greater than the charges following—that is to say, twenty shillings per annum, payable either yearly, half-yearly, or quarterly, in advance." The Superintendent gave the control of the library to the Board of Governors of the Canterbury College in the year 1873. A contract was entered into by the Provincial Government in 1875 for the construction of a new wing to the library. In 1876 the Provincial Council Library, consisting of 1,212 volumes, was transferred to the Public Library. His Excellency the Governor, in whom all public property was vested by the Abolition Act of 1876, conveyed by deed, bearing date, the 25th July, 1878, the Public Library to the Board of Governors of the Canterbury College. Before the control of the Public Library was transferred to the Board of Governors a public subscription was got up for the purchase of books for the institution. The amount collected was £545 195.; Mr. George Gould, £100 ; handed over by Canterbury Collegiate Union, £109 2s. 6d.; subscriptions transferred by owners, £175: total, £930 Is. 6d.

STATEMENT OF THE ACCOUNTS OP THE CANTERBURY COLLEGE FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1896. Statement op Balances at 31st December, 1896. Accounts. Cb. £ s. d. £ s. d. School of Agriculture, Capital Account .. .. .. .. .. 18,586 8 6 Boys' High School, Capital Account .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,519 5 0 Classical School, Capital Account .. .. .. .. .. .. 1,110 2 1 Superior Education, Capital Account .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,709 2 8 College Maintenance Account .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 974 5 0 Girls' High School, Capital Account .. .. .. .. .. .. 4,769 13 6 Girls' High School, Maintenance Account .. .. .. .. .. 1,154 15 7 Public Library, Circulating, Maintenance Account .. .. .. .. 265 12 9 Museum, Library, and School of Technical Science, Endowment Fund Account .. 678 19 4 Medical School, Reserves Account .. .. ... .. .. .. 2,652 10 8 School of Technical Science, Capital Account .. .. .. .. '.. 19,742 6 4 Astronomical Observatory Account .. .. .. .. .. .. 272 511 Contractors' Deposit Account.. .. .. .. .. .. .. 26 0 0 55,461 7 4 Db. School of Agriculture, Maintenance Account .. .. .. .. .. 756 7 0 School of Art Account .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 272 15 1 Boys' High School, Buildings Account .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,531 7 5 Boys' High School, Maintenance Account .. .. .. .. .. 33 6 6 School of Engineering and Technical Science Account .. .. .. .. 288 12 5 Museum Maintenance Account *. .. .. .. .. .. 10 5 0 3,892 13 5 £51,568 13 11 Bank and Investments. Cb. Drawing Account .. .. .. ..' .. .. £23,193 9 8 Less outstanding cheques .. .. .. .. .. 150 7 6 23,043 2 2 Mortgages of freeholds .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 10,650 0 0 Freehold securities .. .-. .. .. •• ■• •• .. 16,975 11 9 Purchase of Girls' High School site (deeds held).. .. .. .. .. 900 0 0 ■ £51,568 13 11 Liabilities. Contractor's deposit .. .. .. .. •. ■ • ■ • • • 26 0 0 Bank of New South Wales .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 19,000 0 0 Public Library—Scrip of shareholders .. .. .. .. .. .. 113 10 2 £19,139 10 2

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School of Agriculture, Maintenance Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 1,807 15 8 By A.—School maintenance and tuitionBent of reserves .. .. .. 1,649 19 8 Salaries .. .. .. 1,376 19 3 Interest on capital .. .. .. 1,296 0 6 Board of Advice .. .. 200 17 11 Beceipts from students— Contribution towards expenses of Fees .. .. .. .. 1,720 10 0 Registrar's Office .. .. 100 0 0 Sale of books and instruments .. 67 8 0 Travelling-expenses of students .. 49 18 0 Penalties .. .. .. 12 4 3 Printing and advertising .. 73 15 6 Receipts from farm— Laboratory—Apparatus, &c. .. 61 6 2 Sale of wheat .. .. ~ 252 8 2 Library—Books, &c. .. .. 34 3 7 barley .. .. .. 10 4 6 Stationery, stamps, and telegrams 40 2 4 seeds .. .. .. 49 3 7 Prizes and certificates .. .. 20 19 11 sheep .. .. .. 742 15 3 Law-costs and extras for visitors.. 52 16 6 pig s ~ .. .. 175 14 2 Students'expenses to saleyards .. 4 12 4 cattle .. .. .. 170 19 7 B. —Maintenance of students and teach- " wool .. .. .. 263 5 4 ing staff .. .. .. 2,006 3 5 dairy produce .. .. 296 16 7 C—Maintenance of buildings and horses .. .. .. 23 12 3 grounds— oa tg ;; .. ~ 213 4 Insurance of buildings .. .. 100 13 4 straw .. .. .. 010 0 Repairs to school-buildings, furni- " sacks .. .. .. 813 10 ture, &c. .. .. .. 407 10 2 peas .. ~ _ _ 2 2 0 Labour on grounds, plantations, &c. 154 1 6 potatoes .. .. .. 47 17 6 D.—Books and instruments, for students 23 14 10 Rent'of land .. .. .. 5 0 0 E.—Contingencies (school) .. .. 45 10 0 Sale of implements .. .. .. 12 0 0 F.—Experimental work .. .. 35 3 1 Balance .. .. .. 756 7 0 G.—Orchard .. .. .. 71 911 H.—Workshop— Wages .. .. .. 70 10 0 Tools and material .. .. 47 19 9 I.—lnterest .. .. .. 103 1 5 Erection of fowl-yards .. .. 30 2 6 Telephone Exchange (subscription) .. 19 0 0 Inspection of reserves .. .. 17 15 5 Farm — Farm labour and superintendence .. 746 0 9 Students' labour .. .. .. 102 7 8 Trade accounts .. .. .. 201 1 1 Manures .. .. .. .. 28 0 3 Seeds .. .. .. .. 20 7 11 Implements .. .. .. 4 19 8 Fuel .. .. .. .. 18 9 3 Bates .. .. .. .. 37 2 4 Appliances for dairy .. .. 51 5 7 Permanent improvements .. .. 28 18 6 Purchase of live-stock .. .. 509 7 8 Contingencies .. .. .. 23 0 6 Pigs, imported from England .. 58 3 3 Tool-house .. .. .. 13 0 0 Binders .. .. .. .. 55 0 0 Gardener's cottage .. .. 130 12 6 Purchase of additional land for farm (50 acres, Pannett) .. .. 1,100 0 0 Additions to buildings (servants' quarters) .. .. .. 1,097 17/= 5 £9,374 1 2 £9,374 1 2 By Balance, Ist January, 1897, £756 7 0 School of Agriculture, Capital Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 18,609 1110 By Legal expenses .. .. .. 25 8 2 Payment for 4 acres 3 roods 20 perches Share of cost of inspection and report excess in Rural Section 29913, pur- on Saxton's Estate, Robinson's Bay 4 17 0 chased out of Reserve 1574 .. 9 15 0 Insurance—Saxton's Estate (share) .. 2 13 2 Balance .. .. .. .. 18,586 8 6 £18,619 6 10 £18,619 6 10 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897.. £18,586 8 6 School of Art Account. 1896. Receipts. £, s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Students' fees .. .. .. 560 13 0 By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 263 19 8 Grant from Museum, Library, and School Salaries .. .. .. .. 932 17 1 of Technical Science Endowment .. 600 0 0 : Bonuses to life classes .. .. 41 10 0 Grant from Boys' High School for in- Insurance .. .. .. .. 10 0 8 struction in drawing .. .. 50 0 0 Prizes .. .. .. .. 15 15 0 Examination-fees .. .. .. 5 0 0! Incidental expenses .. .. .. 98 6 6 Cheque drawn in 1895 (cancelled) .. 2 2 0 Contribution towards expenses of BegisBalance .. .. .. .. 272 15 1 trar's office .. .. .. 30 0 0 Gas .. .. .. .. 41 16 9 Repairs .. .. .. .. 10 8 0 Repairs to skylight .. .. .. 34 5 6 Grant to Miss Crooke for long service .. 5 0 0 Interest .. .. .. .. 6 10 11 £1,490 10 1 £1,490 10 1 By Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £272 15 1

E.—7

14

Boys' High School, Capital Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 455 5 0 By Balance .. .. .. .. 2,519 5 0 White, H. —Purchase of Reserve 1230, 258 acres at £8 .. .. .. 2,064 0 0 £2,519 5 0 £2,519 5 0 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £2,519 5 0 Boys' High School, Maintenance Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. ... 32 13 9 By Salaries .. .. .. .. 3,835 0 0 Fees .. .. .. .. 2,058 10 6 Contribution to School of Art, for inRent of reserves .. .. .. 2,617 9 1 struction given in drawing .. .. 50 0 0 Rent of reserves outstanding for 1895 .. 466 16 1 Insurance .. .. .. .. 30 12 4 Sale of parsing notes.. .. .. 0 7 9 Contribution towards expenses of RegisInterest on p.n. (Wright) .. .. 2 8 5 trar's office .. .. .. 90 0 0 Interest .. .. .. .. 10 3 3 Examiners'fees .. .. .. 78 3 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 33 6 6 Leaving exhibitions .. .. .. 30 0 0 Chemicals and apparatus .. .. 30 4 3 Inspecting reserves and advertising .. 165 0 10 Interest on Loan Account (£5,000) .. 250 0 0 Expenses in ' connection with endowments — Reserve 1163 (stable) .. .. 22 0 0 1223 (road) .. .. 10 0 0 1183 „ .. .. 3 3 0 1124 (protective works) .. 66 10 0 1124 (expenses connected with sale) .. .. 9 9 6 2009 (breakwater) .. .. 15 0 0 Incidental expenses of maintenance— Fuel and lighting .. .. .. 45 18 4 Printing, stationery, books, &c. .. 125 13 7 Prizes .. .. .. .. 48 19 6 Expenses of entertainments .. 28 11 0 Keeping grounds in order .. .. 10 810 Grant to Cadet corps .. .. 15 0 0 Bent of cricket-ground .. .. 45 0 0 Cleaning, washing, &c. .. .. 19 10 8 School furniture and fittings .. 6 9 6 Gymnastic apparatus .. .. 6 9 6 Repairs .. .. .. .. 96 9 6 Legal expenses .. .. .. 14 12 0 Advertising .. .. .. 37 17 11 Grant to school library .. .. 5 0 0 Sundry expenses .. .. .. 30 12 1 £5,221 15 4 £5,221 15 4 By Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £33 6 6 Boys' High School, Buildings Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance .. .. .. .. 2,531 7 5 By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 1,486 3 6 Clephane, A., balance of contract for additions .. .. .. .. 517 0 0 Clephane, A., extras on contract .. 82 13 6 Salary of clerk of works .. .. 28 10 0 Collins and Harman, architect's commission, &c. .. .. .'. 51 6; 0 Graham, P., contract for urinals, &c. .. 341 8 5 Collins and Harman, architect's commission .. .. .. .. 24 6 0 £2,531 7 5 £2,531 7 5 By Balance, Ist Jan., 1897.. £2,531 7 5 Boys' High School, Loan Redemption Account. Receipts. £ s. d. I Expenditure. £, s„ d. To Bank of New South Wales, advance to pay off loan from New Zealand Trust and Loan Company .. '.', 5,000 0 0 By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 5,000 0 0 Superior Education, Capital Account. Beceipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 2,713 11 2 By Legal expenses .. •.•. .. 217 5 Share of cost of inspection and report on Saxton's Estate, Robinson's Bay.. 10 0 Share of insurance of buildings on Saxton's Estate .. .. .. 011 1 Balance .. .. .. .. 2,709 2 8 £2,713 11 2 £2,713 11 2 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897.. £2,709 2 8

E.—7

15

Classical School, Capital Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 1,110 2 1 By Balance .. .. .. .. 1, 110 2 1 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897.. £1,110 2 1 College Maintenance Account. Receipts. £ s. d. I 1896. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 488 410 By Salaries .. .. .. •■ 6,201 0 0 Rent of reserves— Incidental expenses (College) .. 558 2 6 Classical school .. .. .. 4,12117 5 „ (Chemical laboradue 1895 .. .. 768 1 3 tory) .. .. 196 13 2 Town sections ... .. .. 424 18 0 „ (Biological laboraSuperior education ... .. 2,405 0 0 tory) .. .. 71 16 8 Transferred from College Fees Account 971 0 6 Insurance (College) .. .. .. 109 19 8 Interest on capital .. .. .. 266 511 „ (Chemical laboratory) .. 69 bO Sale of College calendars .. .. 4 6 9 „ (Biological „ ) .. 517 3 Analysis fees and sales of apparatus Rates .. .. .. .. 6 14 4 (laboratory) .. .. .. 6 3 0 Exhibitions.. .. .. .. 140 0 0 Contributions towards salaries of Regis- Contributions to School of Engineering trar and staff, and office expenses — . and Technical Science— From Library ... .. .. 20 0 0 For maintenance .. .. 550 0 0 Boys' High School. ... 90 0 0 For scholarships .. .. 60 0 0 „ Girls' High School.. .. 60 0 0 Books, &c, for College library .. 34 3 3 School of Engineering .. 30 0 0 Bepairs to College lodge .. .. 50 2 0 Schoel of Art .. .. 30 0 0 Expenses of music lectures .. .. 11 9 6 „ Museum .. .. .. 30 0 0 Bepairs .. .. .. .. 138 12 7 School of Agriculture .. 100 0 0 Inspecting reserves and advertising .. 81 2 9 Rent of College lodge .. .. 65 0 0 Painting College buildings .. .. 22 12 0 Rent of building (School of Engineering) 193 18 4 Intest on loan (£12,000) .. .. 646 10 2 Hire of chairs and gas (College hall) .. 21 0 0 Expenses incurred in appointment of Sale of text-books .. .. .. 14 3 Professor of English Literature .. 99 16 8 Interest on rent in arrears (p.ns.) .. 411 5 Stairs, storeroom, &c. (School of EngiInterest on current account .. .. 16 9 4 neering) .. .. .. .. 36 14 3 Students' fines .. .. .. 3 8 6 Magazine Club—students' fines .. 218 0 Apparatus for biological laboratory .. 53 13 9 Balance .. .. .. •• 974 5 0 '.'. . £10,121 9 6 £10,121 9 6 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £974 5 0 College Fees of Professors Account. 1896. '' Receipts. £ s. d, 1896. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Students'fees .. .. .. 1,242 3 0 By Professor of Classics .. .. .. 103 19 0 Fees for popular science lectures .. 717 6 Professor of Mathematics .. .. 112 17 6 Fines .. .. .. .. 0 7 0 Professor of Chemistry and Physics .. 76 13 0 Examination-fees— Examination-fees paid to professors and Exempted students .. .. 96 12 0 lecturers .. .. •• •• 45 5 0 Music „ .. .. 15 15 0 Supervisors' fees and expenses of examination of exempted students _ .. 46 12 6 Supervisors' fees for music examination 2 13 6 Refund of examination-fees .. .. 3 13 6 Balance transferred to College maintenance 971 0 6 ■ £1,362 14 6 £1,362 14 6 School of Engineering and Technical Science Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Grant from Museum, Library, and School By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 564 310 of Technical Science Endowment Salaries .. .. • • • • 750 0 0 Fund ".. .. .. . • 618 18 4 Bent of building (College) .. .. 193 18 4 Grant from rents of Superior Education Scholarships .. • • _• • 60 0 0 Reserves (College)— Contribution towards expenses of RegisFor maintenance .. .. 550 0 0 trar's office .. ■ • • • 30 0 0 Scholarships '.. .. .. 60 0 0 Gas .. •• •• •• 35 13 3 Students' fee's .. .. .. 241 7 6 Incidental expenses .. .. • • 124 5 8 Testing-fees.'. - .. ".. .. 27 15 0 Interest .. •• •• •• 15 9 8 Balance .... ... .... ... 288 12 5 Insurance .. .. •• •• 13 2 6 £1,786 13 3 13 3 By Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 ... £288 12 5 Girls' High School, Capital Account. Receipts. £ s. d. ( Expenditure. £s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 4,774 2 9j By Legal expenses .. .. .. 218 2 Share of cost of inspection and report on Saxton's Estate (Robinson's Bay) .. 10 0 Share of cost of insurance on Saxton's Estate .. .. .. .. 011 1 ... ... Balance .. .. .. .. 4,769 13 6' £4,774 2 9 £4,774 2 9 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £4,769 13 6

E.—7

16

Girls' High School, Investment Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Rent of site, Girls' High School .. 45 0 0 By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 900 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 900 0 0 Interest on investment (Girls' High School maintenance) .. .. 45 0 0 £945 0 0 £945 0 0 By Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 ..£9OO 0 0 Girls' High School, Maintenance Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 1,167 14 11 By Salaries .. .. 1,546 9 4 School fees .. .. .. .. 1,517 5 0 Contribution towards expenses of RegisRent of reserves .. .. .. 304 18 4 trar's office .. .. .. 60 0 0 Interest on capital .. .. .. 269 16 5 Insurance .. .. .. .. 10 2 0 Interest on current account .. .. 41 7 2 Rent of school-site .. .. .. 45 0 0 Interest on investment (£900).. .. 45 0 0 Inspecting reserves .. .. .. 10 9 2 Proceeds from cooking-class .. .. 32 17 0 Examination-fees .. .. .. 51 16 0 Sale of pianette .. .. .. 16 0 0 Incidental expenses .. .. .. 197 4 3 Rowe, T. W.—Refund of part of exami- Scientific apparatus .. .. .. 17 9 11 nation-fee paid in excess .. .. 015 0 Repairs .. .. .. .. 717 3 Expenses of cooking-class .. .. 54 5 4 Scholarships and exhibitions .. .. 240 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 1,154 15 7 £3,395 8 10 £3,395 8 10 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £1,154 15 7 Public Library (Circulating), Maintenance Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 218 12 10 By Salaries .. .. .. .. 455 8 0 Contribution from Museum, Library, Contribution towards expenses of Regisand School of Technical Science En- trar's office .. ... .. 20 0 0 dowment Fund .. .. .. 563 0 0 Insurance .. .. .. .. 60 4 6 Subscriptions .. .. .. 739 14 6 Gas .. .. .. .. 139 9 3 Fines .. .. .. .. 14 18 2 Fuel .. .. .. .. 25 16 11 Sale of catalogues .. .. .. 7 0 8 New books (Circulating Library) .. 180 12 9 Sale of magazines .. .. .. 410 7 Renewal of standard works .. .. 23 16 2 Sale of waste paper .. .. .. 6 2 2 Periodicals and English newspapers .. 70 0 8 Reserving books .. .. .. 4 10 6 Colonial newspapers.. .. .. 37 12 9 Rent of room (Medical Society) .. 3 3 0 Incidental expenses .. .. .. 137 18 11 Interest .. .. .. .. 12 6 6 Repairs .. .. .. .. 26 1 10 Sale of books (duplicates) .. .. 019 6 Reference Library (books and binding) 106 11 7 Legal expenses .. .. .. 110 Dressing outer wall .. .. .. 24 11 4 Balance .. .. .. .. 265 12 9 £1,574 18 5 £1,574 18 5 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £265 12 9 Museum, Library, and School of Technical Science Endowment Fitnd Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Rent of reserves .. .. .. 2,47113 4 By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 128 8 5 Interest on capital .. .. .. 1,376 11 8 Contributions — Museum .. .. .. .. 1,125 0 0 Public Library .. .. .. 563 0 0 School of Art .. .. .. 600 0 0 School of Engineering and Technical Science .. .. .. 618 18 4 Inspection of reserves .. .. 17 15 5 Legal expenses .. .. .. 210 0 Interest .. .. .. .. 109 2 9 Advertising.. .. .. .. 3 2 1 Sundries .. .. ..- .. 188 Balance .. .. .. .. 678 19 4 £3,848 5 0 £3,848 5 0 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £678 19 4 Medical School Reserves. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 4,900 3 4 By Inspection of reserves .. .. 8 7 9 Rent of reserves .. .. .. 310 12 0 Contribution to Biological Laboratory Interest .. .. .. .. 250 3 1 Buildings Account .. .. 2,800 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 2,652 10 8 £5,460 18 5 £5,460 18 5 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897.. £2,652 10 8

17

E.—7

School of Technical Science, <£c, Capital Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 19,765 2 6 By Share of cost of inspection and report on Saxton's Estate (Robinson's Bay) 5 3 0 Share of insurance on Saxton's Estate 2 16 5 Legal expenses .. .. .. 14 16 9 Balance .. .. .. .. 19,742 6 4 £19,765 2 6 £19.765 2 6 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897.. £19,742 6 4 Museum, Maintenance Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 144 14 0 By Salaries .. .. .. .. 826 0 0 Contribution from Museum, Library, Insurance .. .. .. .. 83 210 and School of Technical Science En- Interest on Loan Account (£2,000) .. 100 0 0 dowment Fund .. .. 1,125 0 0 Incidental expenses .. .. .. 149 18 8 Sale of guide-books .. .. .. 9 6 0 Contributions towards expenses of RegisInterest .. .. .. .. 6 13 6 trar's office .. .. .. 30 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 10 5 0 Bepairs .. .. .. .. 106 17 0 £1,295 18 6 £1,295 18 6 By Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £10 5 0 Museum Loan Redemption Account. 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Advance from Bank of New South Wales By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 2,000 0 0 to repay loan to New Zealand Trust and Loan Company .. .. 2,000 0 0 £2,000 0 0 I £2,000 0 0 1 mm—-mmmm^ Astronomical Observatory Account. Receipts. £ s. d. I Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 1,139 14 11 IBy Contribution to Biological Laboratory Interest .. .. .. .. 56 4 1 and Observatory Buildings Account .. 865 7 1 Erection of telescope .. .. 43 5 5 Observatory fittings .. .. .. 7 9 10 Architects'fees .. .. .. 5 5 0 Sundries for Observatory .. .. 2 5 9 Balance .. .. .. .. 272 5 11 £1,195 19 0 £1,195 19 0 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 .. £272 511 Biological Laboratory and, Observatory Buildings Account. 1896. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Contribution from Medical School re- By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 2,113 19 5 serves .. .. .. .. 2,800 0 0 Bowen, W.—Balance of contract .. 1,075 16 3 Contribution from Astronomical Obser- Clerk of works' salary .. .. 15 0 0 vatory Account .. .. .. 865 7 1 Architects' fees and expenses .. .. 159 13 9 Fencing and roadway .. .. 27 5 6 Laying out grounds .. .. .. 12 7 6 Lamp and gas connection .. .. 10 10 3 Moving and painting show-cases .. 24 14 3 External stair to Observatory .. .. 66 18 0 Interest .. .. .. .. 159 2 2 £3,665 7 1 £3,665 7 1 Mortgage of Freeholds Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d.. To Freehold Securities Account transfer .. 17,025 11 9 By Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 41,14116 9 Murphy, P. J.—Repayment .. .. 1,866 5 0 Strachey and wife —Repayment .. 11,600 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 10,650 0 0 £41,141 16 J) £41,141 16 - !* By Balance, Ist Jan., 1897.. £10,650 0 0 Freehold Securities Account. Receipts. £ s. d. 1896. Expenditure. £ a. d. To Wall, John — Payment on account for By Mortgage of Freeholds Account (transfer) 17,025 li 9 purchase of part of Burkes land .. 50 0 0 Balance .. .. .. .. 16,975 11 9 £17,025 11 9 £17T025 11 9 By Balance,lst Jan.,1897.. £16,975 11 9

3—E. 7.

E.—7

18

Contractors' Deposit Account. Receipts. £ s. d. Expenditure. £ s. d. To Balance, Ist January, 1896 .. .. 134 0 0 By Bowen, W— Repayment .. .. 108 0 0 Balance .. . .. .. .. 26 0 0 £134 0 0 £134 0 0 To Balance, Ist Jan., 1897 ..£26 0 0

Examined and found correct, except that funds of the trusts of the Board of Governors, to the amount of £19,000, appearing as a liability for an overdraft from the bank, have been applied unlawfully to the repayment of loans raised for other trusts of the Board, and that there is nothing to authorise either the charge or the allowance which has been made for interest in respect of such application. —J. K. Wakburton, Controller and Auditor-General. Approximate Cost of Paper. —Preparation, not given ; printing (1,525 copies), £13 lis. 6d.

Authority : John Mackay, Government Printer, Wellington.—lB97.

Price 6'rf.l

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/parliamentary/AJHR1897-II.2.2.3.14

Bibliographic details

E-07 EDUCATION: THE CANTERBURY COLLEGE (PAPERS RELATING TO). [In continuation of E.-7, 1896.], Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives, 1 January 1897

Word Count
13,875

E-07 EDUCATION: THE CANTERBURY COLLEGE (PAPERS RELATING TO). [In continuation of E.-7, 1896.] Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives, 1 January 1897

Working