Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE ELECTIONS.

TIE RAGLAN SEAT; COLONEL BELL AT HAMILTON. REFORM LEAGUE DENOUNCED. Never in its history has Hamilton experienced a meeting, political or otherwise, such as the one held at the Hamilton Town Hall last night, when Colonel Allen Bell, one of the Opposition, candidates for the Raglan electorate, addressed an audience of some thousand or more persons. The recent allegations circulated in connection with Mr Allen Bell, that .he sold his party at the last election, his repudiation, of the charge, his promise of an explanation, and his trenchant attack on thi Reform Party last week, togethe) ' with the knowledge: that members of the Reform Party would be presen in their own defence, led to all lav-ail able space in the hall being taken many members of the audience hav ing to take up positions on the piatflwm. It was evident/ from the outset that there was to be "some fun." the atmosphere from the verj beginniing being electric with sup pressed excitement. The candidate first dealt brieflj with tihe political situation gener ally, touching upon tRe various quas tinns of moment, and outlining his platform. It was not, however, un til he undertook gut explanation o: his relations with the Reform Part 3 that the audience gave vent to its pent-up excitement. The speaker outlined the charges which, briefly, were to, the effect tha he sold his party a t the last election by adopting the bare majority plank in bis campaign platform. The explanation he gave to this precisely as the one given at Claudia lands last Friday night, and which having been published at length ir our issue of the following day, w< will not trouble our readers with repetition. In making his explanation, Mr Bell said he had been forced tc •adopt his present hostile attitude

tbe altogether unfair, ungenerous and unwarranted attitude which the executive of the Reform Party had adopted towards him No more cowardly action had ever been taken by anyone than was adopted n y the Auckland executive of the Reform League, in its publication of the hostile article regarding him in one of the Auckland papers on Saturday last, at the final moment, when it was too late for him to overtake it. (A voice : "Hit out straight !" and chorus of voices: "Shame!") The speaker declared, amid loud applause, and. cries of " Hit them," "Let them have it," and various other ejaculations, that there was no organisation, be it Liberal, Socialistic or any other side, which woul have taken the action the Reform League had. That statement, he said, had done him a tremendous amount of harm. On Saturday he read in a Conservative paper that he had been written, to by the secretary of the Auckland executive regarding his attitude on a certain matter, but he wanted to tell them that be had never received that letter, dnd on reading the statement <hd wired to the secretary of the Reform League informing 'him to this effect. The reason he decided to have nothing to do with tbe committee of the Reform Party was because he discovered that it was used not for the purpose of raising the status of politics, but in the Interests of the liquor party. ("Hear, hear !" cheers, and cries of "That's right" and "Good man"). They had been told by Mr E. H. Northcroft, secretary of tbe Hamilton branch of the Political Reform League, that the statements recorded of his selling his party were not made by the Reform League, but that members of the executive may have made them. " I say," declared the speaker emphatically, "that members of the League did make rhern, and whether by the League as individuals, or by the League as a whole, it makes not the slightest difference, as the statements have gone forth with authority." (Applause). The speaker further stated that he had never known any one of his political exponents, either in the present or at the last campaign, stoop so low as had the secretary of the Hamilton branch of the Reform League for the purpose of damaging his (Mr Bell's) position (loud and prolonged cheers). He drew Mr Northcrcft's attention on Friday night, be said, to the fact that he (Mr Northcroft) had written a letter, a portion of which contained a statement which had been used to his (the speaker's) (detriment. This he heard and repudiated it. The following day he inquired as to who the informant was, and his questioner told him that the statement was contained in & letter to a friend of his. The following Sunday he received word to the effect that the author of the statement was 'Northcroft, o-f Hamilton.' (Hooting and uproar). That statement was circulated and was actually read at a meeting of the Reform League in the Auckland district- (A voice : '"Who wrote you the letter ?"). Mr Bell : ".Mr T. H. Beale, of Tuakau." (Applause). The statement was circulated, continued the speaker, with the object of showing that he was quite insincere when he took up the no-license banner at the last election. No more contemptible action than this had ever been done by any political organisation or anybody connected with politics, he declared, and a man who would stoop so low deserved the contempt of the people of the whole country. The speaker, who said he was aware that Mr Northcroft was then in the hall, then proceeded to give bis opinion of him, Ms concluding remarks being drowned in the hubbub which ensued, hissing and hooting, mingled with loud cheers, greeting the speaker. When the noise had subsided, the speaker said he did not care if fifty thousand Reform Leagues were against him, they would not drive him out of politics, and he was going to advocate what reforms he thought would benefit the country. Referring to another statement which had been circulated against him, that he was unfit to wear the Kine's uniform, the speaker declared that there was no man in New Zealand more patriotic than he, and there was no man who had done more to serve his country (loud applause). The candidate spoke of the campaigns he had served through, and of the large amount of time and money be had spent on organism <r and developing patriotic institutions, his statements being Greeted with prolonged applause. He added that there wac not a- single person in the audience on the ni jht bo delivered his former address in Hamilton who misconstrued his statements as had been done by persons outside, and anyone saying that Allen Bell was unpatriotic would be telling a downright lie (loud applause). The speaker resumed his seat amid

loud and prolonged cheering. Mr Northcroft, who in the meantime, had made his wuy on to the platform, here arose and attempted to address the audience, but <hds words were- drowned in the surging hostility of the voices which greeted them. Several times he essayed to speak, but on, each occasion ihe was assailed with cries of "sit down" and renewed hooting. At last, on the appeal of Colonel Bell, who ftaL&d that he had invited members of the Reform League to attend and that the audience would be granting him a personal favour by allowing Mr Northcroft to speak, the latter was permitted to proceed. The speaker said that before refuting! Colonel Bell's statements regarding the Reform League, he would first, reply tci the assertion wh»ch,, 0 n the testimony of "this man" (Colonel Bell) th 3 audience had the 'audacity to hcot him (the speaker). He defied any one to prove that during the four years he (Mr Northcroft ) had been in Hamilton, that he had ever been, guilty of telling a lie (loud laughter and cheers and a voice : "And you a lawyer"/. Mr Northcroft, when allowed to continue, said he had with him his letter-book, in which all letters written in connection with the Reform League were copied, and nowhere in that book was the> letter referred to by Colonel Bell. He defied anyone to find in the 'book a letter containing the paltry suggestion alleged of Urn. and he challenged Mr Bell to produce the original. He was prepared to hand -his book over to the chairman for investigation. The speaker denied that he had ever, either by letter or word of mouth, made the suggestion as stated by Colonel Bell. Referring, to the statements tnat the Reform Party had accused Colonel Bell of selling his party, the speaker said the latter body had done no such thing, but they did state, and still maintained, that he had sold his committees by failing to take them into his confi ■ dence. Colonel Bell told them thai because the Hamilton executive appointed a local committee of mc-n largely interested in the liqiuor trade, he said, and he could not trust them. (A voice: "Quite right.">> At that time Colonel Bell was not more than a moderate drinker and they were entitled to suppose that he heid the ordinary moderate views of the average man. They all knew that the failure of Colonel Bell at the last election was not because the people were not Oppositionists, but because he turned on his party on the liquor question, (cries of "No") and they all knew that the reason he was not chosen as candidate for Waikato this time was because hj" would have been unable to get in (Applause and cries of "Yes, that's true"}. He challenged the candidate to there and then explain why he did nOt stand for Waikato instead of for Raglan. The speaker went on to explain that although Colonel Bell's, name was submitted more frequently than any other as , a prospective candidate, yet the executive was unanimous in adopting Mr Bollard. Thg speaker contiinued a little further, being frequently interrupted, and' resumed his seat amid loud hooting-. Colonel Bell, replying, said 'that W'hat the Reform League wanted was a man with a back like an eel, whom they could bend according to their requirements. (Laughter and applause)). The letter written iyMr Northcroft. of which the latter repudiated authorship, was written by Mr Northcroft, not as secretary of the League, but as a private individual, and would not, therefore, appear in the letter-book. The letter was written to Mr Wiley, secretary of the Political Reform League, and had been, used by him. (Applause). When the time for questions came Mr A. Lorie entered the platform. when the uproar which greeted Mr Northcroft's appearance ° was recommenced. Tne chairman, Mr P. W. Mason, announced that Colonel Bell bad invited members of the Reform Party to be present, but had not extended the invitation to Mr Lorie, and was not therefore Prepared to. allow that gentleman to assume the floor. (The announcement was greeted with laud cheers,) Mr Lorie : "He dare not !' : (Prolonged hooting.) Mr Lorie made several attempts to obtain a bearing, but his efforts were futile, as, after the chairman's ruling, the crowd absolutely refused to listen to him, and each time he rose to has feet, or interjected, he was greeted with a long-drawn "boo" issuing from some hundreds of throats. After a number of more or less unimportant Questions had Veen asked, the following resolution was moved by Mr Livingstone : " That this meeting accords Colonel Bell a hearty vote of thanks for his address, and expresses the opinir-n that his record in the defence of bis Sovereign and country in the past, and the further testimony of his patriotism this evening, leaves no doubt as to his loyalty ; and that this meeting expresses sympathy with him in the Position in which he has been placed owing to the untruthful reports circulated." Mr Lorie, who still retained his seat on the platform, handed the chairman a written amendment, but the latter staled that knowing the speaker of the evening' as he did—he held no 'brief for him*— he would not insult him or any man by putting all amendment of the character submitted. (Uproarious applause). The motion, which was seconded by Mr Allen, was carried amid tumultous cheering, and the meeting, which broke up in confusion, ended on© of the most notable acd lively public j gatherings ever held in the town. Mr A. Lorie has asked as to publish the following question and amendment which he wished to ask and move at last night's meeting. The question is You are reported in the press of last Saturday to have said at your Claudelands meeting that your remarks on the Monarchy had ibeen misconstrued. Seeiog, that you stated in Hamilton that you believed! and hoped that in a very short time Monarohy would go, and that we should bQ living under a Republic, and that you further stated afterwards at Gordonton that such were your views, and that you did not hesitate to express them, will you explain how such clear statements' could possibly have been misinterpreted, especially »n view of the fact -that when the Argus in a leading article referred to you holding such Republican views,, you made no protest, and also in view of the fact that you were so satisfied wfcth the Argus report fully detailing your Republican views, that you ordered it t 0 be reprinted ; and, further, in face of the fact that long before your Hamilton meeting you stated that you did not believe in Monarchy ? AMENDMENT. "That as Col. Bell by his deliblerately expressed hope for the downfall of our Monarchy Jias insulted the memories of our late beloved Monarcbs, Queen Victoria and King

Edward, both of whom are reooginised by every rightminded person in the civilised world, as having teed models of what constitutional rulers should be, ti*s meeting desires to express its abhorrence of the Republican views voiced by Col. Bell." MR BELL'S ADDRESS. (To the Editor.) Sir, As , a citizen of Hamilton and one of the six or seven hundred, who listened to Colonel Allen Bell's address at his first meeting I vigorously protest against the statements made that Colonel Bell's utterances were in a ny way disloyal. The large audience/ received no such impression and by their silence they, as well as Col. Bell could '1 >: accused of disloyalty. I claim to be a loyal subject of my Kin ? and country a nd had his remarks born even the semblance of disloyalty I would have been one of the first to take exception to them. Colonel Bell's splendid record as a soldier of the Empire in South Africa and New Zealand give the best: possible proof of. his patriotism and as he stated at his Claudeland's meeting Ms loyalty did not countl on Rule Britannia and God Save the King, but on taking , a n active part in building up that Empire of which--' we are all so justly proud. Colonel Bell fought in defence of his King and country and the same cannot be said of those who seek to do a good citizen of the Empire an injur y ._i am, etc., W. ATJLD. Hamilton. THE REFORM LEAGUE AND NOLICENSE. (To the Editor). Sir,—As a member 0 f the NoLicense party I thank Mr Northcroft for his lucid explanation of th© attitude of the Political Reform Leagn© towards the No-License .question and the bare majority. If p roof Wen needed of the sympathy of the Reform League to the liquor interests it was given by Mr Northcroft at Colonel Bell's meeting last night. I trust that the eyes of the electors ta\e now been opened and that they will voice their disapproval of an organisation of this kind.—l .am, etc. NO-LICENSE. ' Hamilton.

monarchy AND REPUBLICANISM. (To the Editor.) acce s r ;~!° r f oVer 75 years, since the a i !. Wlse rule Qf British, monarehs affld the success , 0 f the British Constitution have been universal ;~ d throu «e 3 One of the first acts of Queen Victoria to insist (in opposition to her Ministers wishes) that her household should be chosen regardless of their religious beliefs, this being one of the most important steps in British religious liberty. The life of Queen- Victoria was a Pattern to .all rulers. Fawcett says • By her personal devotion to duty she cieated modern constitutionalism, and more than any single person has made Britain and the British monarchy what they now are. During her reign the kingdom has become an Empire, the greatest in the history of the world. The record of Queen Victoria's life is one of 'work, diligent and unceasing, transacted day by day, and details of the serious steady work abound on all the records. At one crisis in the troubled year 1848 , 28,000 despatches were received and sent from, the Foreign Office alone, all of which passed through the Queen's hands. The Crown, is probably stronger now because practically more useful than it has ever been. At one time there were many who were in love V with Republican forms and terms ; there are few of them now who have not come to see that a Monarchy such as that of England is more free and of greater benefit to the people. As far as freedom is concerned, both personal and political, the subjects of the English Crown are better off than those of France or the United States ; the former know little 0 f personal freedom, and the latter are not free individually as against the great party organisations. Whatever her political leanings, Queen Victoria never allowed them to Mas her conduct. If the nation preferred as Prime Minister Peel or Melbourne or Reaconsfieid to Gladstone she accepted the verdict and gave efiect loyally to the national will ; she has shown, by example how to unite monarchy with constitutionalism, and that goodness, purity, truth and justice exalt a monarch and give prosperity to a nation. When we remember that ovulate beloved King Edward was known over all the world as "The Peacemaker," we require no further tribute to his memory ; the rulers o! all countries locked to him for counsel. So proud a position 'has never before been held 'by any monarch. King George has yet to prove himself ; up to the present we Cain only say that 'be has made no mistakes cs , a ruler, and that he is beloved of his people. When we rememDer that our t ~4> late monarchs both died natural deaths, sincerely mourned by their people., whereas in the same period three American Presidents were assassinated by their subjects we need go no further to see which rule is the more popular. The monarchs of England are trained from their youth to a sense of responsibility of the position they will occupy, and to place their personal and the national honour before ali things, and only |an ignorant person or one with prij vate ends to serve would suggest that a demagogue could serve the nation equally well as the trained I monarch, who is free from all finan- | cial temptations. When we remember! j the smirched records of some of our I public men, who, if we bad been a re- ! public, would have been our presidents, we should feel grateful to God : Almighty that our constitution is | what it is, and should look with deI testation on one who seeks to disturb it,—l am, etc., A. LORIE. TAUKANGA SEAT (Own Correspondent.) Mr King addressed a large meetin z of electors at Manga whero last r.kvht and received a most cordial reception. The candidate was accorded a unanimous vote of thanks and confidence on the motion of Mr P. Quinlan, seconded by Mr S. Bellamy.

WAIKATO SEAT. MR GREEN SI jADE'S CANDIDATURE. TKis week's Observer says :—"Mr Greenslade's claims to the suffrages of the Waikato electors are based on the solid grounds. A staunch Liberal, he never sacrifices principle to party, and: he is one of the most) ■valuable members the country could possess. He is sound on. the land question, and in him the farmers have a firm friend. He should retain his seat without any difficulty." The Te Araha Mail says In Waikato Greensnlade is opposed by Young', who got such a walloping from Herries for last time. Yourg savs he hasn't changed his politics, but he is under the wing of the Reform Hen, this time. I daresay the electors of the Waikato wiil assign him to his proper place—the bottom of the noli. " WAIKATO ELECTION. (To the Editor.) SIR,—On the eve of the election I feel it my duty to write a few lines in appreciation of the good work done for the residents of the Waikat.i as a whole by the energy and assiduity of Mr. H. J. Greenslade. Ever since it has been our lot to have this gentleman as our representative there has been nothing but progress and contentment. Well do I remember Hamilton when its few business people struggled for ; :\ existence, and there were few flourishing farmers in those days. I know, Sir, that the old Conservative school put all this down to " butter fat" and the in proved market. Quite so, but the advance of Liberalism has been the main factor, for progress follows where its policy is in operation, and those who have been fortunate to go on the land know it, for they are reaping the benefits cf their hard earned toil. The people of the Waikato have much to thank Mr. Greenslade for. No matter what subject has been placed before hini by the backblocks settler it has always received his attention. He is a worker out and out, and the local bodies of the district bear testimony to the fact. It is ail very well for men who are glib of tongue to go round and tell you they wili do this and that, but I sav in "Mr. Greenslade we have t one who we have tried and not found wanting. There is no doubt to my mind that the Liberal party wiil again be returned to power, and I say again let us be true to our trust and again have Waikato represented under the Liberal flag. Fellow Liberals we want no half-loaf men ; do not be led away by misstatements, but remember if we want continued prosperity and efficient representation you cannot do other than support the one who has been a true and energetic member. —I am, etc. AN OLD LIBERAL PARMER. Te Awamutu, December sth.

THE REFORMERS (?)" (To the Editor.) Slß,—The glaring exposure of the so-caiied Reform League by Mr. Allen Bell last evening should be the means of shedding light to the unen'ightened minds of those who are advocating the claims of one of the candidates for the Waikato. Here we have a man who although professedly a Liberal is receiving the moral support of the " Reformers," and judging by the exposure I think there can be no doubt but tbut their nomenclature should have been "Retrogressive." Bew;.r: of " wolves in sheep's clothin;. . ' and have no haif-pie would- j legislators, for its best to tr. t "the devil you know than t.ie devil you don't.". —I am, etc , A TOP-LINER. Hood Street.

CONDUCTING A CAMPAIGN. (To the Editor.) SIR, —Permit me to heartily endorse Mr Ailen Bell';, remarks anen't the social aminuties during the prosecution of the last electoral campaign in Waikato. As oye who practically carried the brunt of work through on Mr Greenslade's behalf I have much pleasure in stating that from start to finish Mr Allen Bell worked and behaved like a thorough gentleman. He fought us as a straight out Oppositionist, and was ever clean, honest and absolutely fair in any matter he put forward in his own interests, and hundreds of our friends in Waikato will bear this out. I have no time for Mr Allen Bell's politics and do not see eye to eye with him in his ideals, but as a fair minded person must unhesitatingly give him credit'for his manly and straight-forward conduct, when he was our political opponent. Re his patriotism. It needs little comment. He has risked his life twice for the honour and glory of his King and country when his traducers would not risk a shirt buttou.—l am, etc., Mark L. Fitzwu-liam. NATIVE MINISTER AT ASHBURTON. (Per Press Association.) ASHBURTON, Wednesday. Sir James Carroll addressed over 1000 people last night and was accorded a most enthusiastic reception, He criticised Mr Massey's manifesto at some length and was accorded a hearty vote of thanks and confidence. MR LUKE ANGRY. WELLINGTON, Wednesday. Mr .J. P. Luke was asked lasi night how he would vote on a noconfidence motion and according to a report published this morning, said about a fortnight ago the Premier sent for him and asked him to stanc aside for another candidate. He had absolutely refused, and ccn sidered the proposal an insult tc him after the services he had rendered the country and city. He would vote to remove the present Government from office and fil their place with men elected to re present the Liberal party in Parlia meat, but he wanted it to be clearl; understood that he would net voti to put Sir Joseph Ward out for th purpose of putting Mr Massey in.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WT19111206.2.12

Bibliographic details

THE ELECTIONS., Waikato Times, Issue 12149, 6 December 1911

Word Count
4,199

THE ELECTIONS. Waikato Times, Issue 12149, 6 December 1911

Working