Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Waikato Times AND THAMES VALLEY GAZETTE.

litju il aiul c\ ie t justw c to all men, Ut wh itscxner state or persuasion, religious or politu .il. Hero s!i ill tlic I'iess the IVople's right m imt.iin, Uii.iwc il \>\ iiiHuunco .iikl unliribrri bv S n>».

lr is a gratifying sign of the times that our Auckland contemporary, the Herald, should bo found indulging in dreams of the glorious possibilities of Anglo Saxon federation. It was only the other day that our friend was giving utterance to tli> gloomiest foreboding upon the same subject. When the draft bill prepared by the Sydney Convention was published the Herald spoke of a gum shadow of Centralism lomiing up beyond. It is a wel(omo change to iind him giving utterance to sentiments such as these :—": — " While the atmosphere is laden with confederation of the Australian colonies, thrre is a grander federation which only reveals itself, in its nobler possibilities, to minds that can leap over the barliers of their immediate surroundings, and forecast what is coming from the signs of the times. The, icderation of the dependencies of England with the mother country in a great confederated empire is not a remute contingency, for it is the natural result of developments that are daily passing 1 before our eves , and there are those living now who will see the present dependencies of England in population, in commerce, and possibly in wealth, surpassing those of the grand old home of the Anglo-Saxon race. In such urcumstances, and with all the possibilities of increasing greatness before them, the colonies must necessarily drop the relations of dependency; and without dismemberment of the Empire, which every true and loyal subject of Her Majesty, and most especially in the colonies, will deprecate, there is nothing ior it but the raising of the colonies to the side of England in the bonds of confederation. That us a \ i-.iou of the near future, which none but the most shortsighted can fail to see." There is a healthy, vigorous spirit in every line we have quoted, and we congratulate our contemporary on a return to his allegiance to his better judgment. But the Herald goes further, and claims that there is a grander federation than th it of the .British Empire. " It is that," says our contemporary, " foreshadowed in a remarkable and spa it-stirring- portion of the •speech delivered by Mr J. 0. Firth, at die dose of the lecture on federation by Sir Frederick Whitaker, and li'published in our other column^ to-day. Says Mr Firth : — 'I for one, as an Englishman, iuel piouil of the English-speaking race on that American Continent, lor oo grandly fulfilling so noble a destiny ; and I look forward to the time, not only for the federation of the Biitish Empire, but for that grander federation, tho confederation of [lie English-speaking 1 race ihioug'houL the world ; when there .shall not only be an Australasian federation, a Canadian, federation, a South African federation, an Anieiican federation, but when thcie shall bo the grander, nobler federation of the Englishspeaking- iate all over the world.' " \Ve agree, with our contemporary when he characterises this as a noble conception, the very thought of which is enough to send a thrill of emotion through every AngloSaxon breast. It is not original, but it is none the worse for that. More than twelve months ago Joseph Cook, the famed Boston lecturer, gave utterance to a similar sentiment, in language equally simple, equally thrilling. He said : — " I should desire Australasia and Americri, and England, and her Empire in India, to be the four sides of a mighty quadrilateral for the advancement of sound ideas in polities, and of .sound doctrine in Christianity. And you will find that England, when she is sufficiently idealised, or Australianised, or Americanised — it's the same thing — we shall have free government upon a mighty scale, influencing the whole world. I trust that I am not speaking with an improper spirit of familiarity when I say that the dearest hope of my heart is that the time is coming when English speaking people will not be merely a political unit, but a grand political alliauce, making arbitration, for ins'ance, a substitute for warfare. I would have improved copyiight laws, and improved patent Jaws, and I would have them both international. I would have such an alliance as to make war impossible. I would cast the moral weight of this alliance into the scale whenever we should be called upon to arbitrate. I have even gone .so far as to express a hope that the time is coming when Great Britain and the United States will be a guarantee for the neutrality of the whole Pacific Ocean. You guarantee the neutrality of the Suez Canal. America will guarantee the Panama Canal. Yes, gravely, I advocate making the whole Pacific Ocean neutral. 1 hope, too, the time will come when we can make the North Atlantic neutral, when we can pufc round the globe a white girdle of peace, until by-and-bye it shall become a vobe, covering the planet from head to foot/ These are tho utterances of no wild rhapsodist: They come from as level-headed and practical a man as there is to be found in the Greater -

Britain cm the west of the Atlantic. And does anyone seriously doubt i hat tho realisation of this high hope woul'l influence the world for good, Avould afford greater securities to lii'o and liberty than any we at present possess, would give a niw life to commerce, would stimulate thi' practice of all the arts and wionces — that it would, in shoit, go to make life better worth the living ? Surely not? And if no!,, let us ask ourselves if Australasian or Pacific loderation be not a step in the direction of attaining this jirandor and nobler unity of which Mr Cook, Mr Firth, and tho Herald speak in such affectionate language. 'Jlio question is not as to whether we are to submit to tho domination of blacks, or Chinese, or Papuans — federation of itself can neithor induce nor prevent such a calamity — but whether we are to follow the example of the Roman provinces, building up separate nations, and fightingamongourselves, or whether we are to band together for mutual support and protection. We do not ask, nor should we allow, the Quoonshimlers to decide where our main roads are t) run, but we ma}' ask, and having asked, expect them to join us in all enterprises having for their aim the advancement of commerce and the maintenance of peace. If the dark skinned people that are, so we are told, to inhabit the greater portion of the Australian continent seek to interfere with our ascertained privileges we must apply the remedies within reach. That it will not., when such a crisis arrives, be difficult to maintain our rights, the oppouents of federation, who are never tired of descanting on the coming glory and power of New Zealand, cannot with a good grace gainsay. Some of our contemporaiies insist that there is a difference between federation and annexation. They argue thus because the extention of the Empire is too popular a hobby to tilt against, while federation, as it appeals less to the heart than the head, may safely bo made a political target. But let it not be forgotten that without federation, there is no safety in annexation, at lcnst only so long 1 as the Imperial Government can afford to keep us under its protecting wing.

The contractor has now completed the new bi ultfe over the Waikato n\ ci at Hoi a bora, but the eaithwoik a]>pioacheb h:u c yet to bj attended to. The htiucturo is, liowever, payable for tiaffic.

The Cambridge Road Board has ayrei'd to iciu<>\e the Haut.ipu ])ound, about which a diffeience has ipcently arisen between Mr (liaham and the board, fiom its pieseut site to n site behind the Tanmheie hotel. Mi Canii> has leceived the job of iemo\ing the inatoiial.

On Crouch's E-oad, otherwise known as th° iS T <>. 2 Czoss Ro,id, in tlie C.unbiidge di^tnct, there is a Luge open chain which has aheady pioved dangerous to traffic; one di.vy and hoi-,e having already conic to gnef in it. Wv would dr.iw the attention of the road board to the matter.

We have been requested to draw the attention of membeis of the HamilUn Choral Society to the advertisement in another pait of this issue, convening a, meeting for Wednesday evening next, at which member^ are requested to attend, to piactiso foi the usual opening conceit.

At the Hamilton^ Police Court, yesterd.iy, bofoio Mr Norlhcioft, D. D. Hyde, u.i*> cliiiigud with having on the 2nd mat comiritted a bieach of the Vagiant Act by \ihing obiceno .md piof.uie language in ;i public place. On the application of the police he was remanded till this morning.

We are sorry to hear that Mr Lo^ie, the postmaster and telegraphist at Hamilton, i& at present unfitted by indisposition to attend to his duties. Dminpr his llln^s his place is 1 being filled by Mr J. W. Hdlmon.

Mr F. R. Claude has sold the gtc.itcr poition of his estate of Clandelaiidt, retaining only that poition known as .Moule's Hill, and the pr.>peity is now offciod for sale by Mr Osmond, land agent, of Anckl.ind. The position of the lands in and adjoining the township should comm.uid for them a ready sale when the railway iis completed.

It is our pleasing duty to draw our reader^' attention to a new venture in New Zealand journalism, supplying, a<* it does, a much felt want m sporting circles. We allude to Tlu> Little Pmk 'Un, or New Zealand Sportsman. Judging from the is-,ue before us (the fir.-.t) theio ought to be a good future in otore for the " little htianger." The piogramme offeied to subscubers in exchange for their " threep'nies " is indeed a liberal one. We wish our old friend the "Skipper" all the &ucce->s his pluck deserves.

At a special meeting of the Cambridge Ko.ul Board held on Saturday last for the pin pose of opening tenders for works in the district, the tender of Mr Mann of €15 was accepted for ole.uing the g<n-se and flax oif the Victoria lload. ttharkoy .and Shaw also tendered. M. Dillons tender for giavelling on the Hainilton-diinbiidge load was accepted at the following prices: —No. 1. Is per yard ; NV>. 2, Is 3d ; No. 3, Is 3d ; No. 4, Is (id ; No. 3, lb Od ; No. fi, 2>. Jos. Hamilton, Jdi. Coombes, and Ciickett and Fergusson also tendered.

Intormation has been received by the Waikato County Council from the Department of Justice that the Cambridge Licensing District has been abolished, and the following disti icts constituted t<. take effect fiom Ist Fcbrinuy, 1884 : — Tamahere Licensing District, comprising the two 1 odd disti icts of Tamahei c and Cambridge ; Cambridge Licensing District, comprising the town district of that name. Recent trouble in the matter of jurisdiction is thus bettled.

The usual monthly meeting of the Hamilton "Road Boaid was held on Saturday. Picsent: — Messrs Atkinson (chairm.ui), Ridler, Way and Exelby. After the usual routine business, the board resolved to instruct its solicitors to take legal proceedings against Mi A. Bell to recover the amount expended in cutting down and gtubbing furze on roads adjoining his farm. On account of the non-receipt of imprest moneys from the Government, it was resolved to stop the gravelling on the Ohiiupo Road foi the piesent. Accounts amounting to £()1 5b were passed for payment, and the board rose.

Dr. Sinclair, the eminent dentist, will .arrive in Hamilton to-day on a professional vt-.it to the Waikato. He will be at Ciunbiidge on Saturday next. Dr. Sinclair comes with the highest credentials from the pi ess of the Australian colonies, wheiehis system of painless dentistry is looked upon as marvellous. The doctor has been for some time in Auckland, and our metropolitan contempoiaries speak in flattering terms oi his ability. Dr. Sinclair, as will be seen by the advertisement, brings with him two competent operators, and patients will thus be enabled to get now teeth manufactured on the spot. During his stay in Hamilton Dr. Sinclair will stay at Gwynne's cottage, and at Cambridge he will \mt up at Kirkwoods private hotel.

The first engine crossed the Hamilton railway bridge in perfect safety yesterday. The engine, one of the six"wheel or " F " class, arrived from Auckland about 2.30 p.m under engagement to the contractors, Messrs Mullinger and Brett, having on board the District Manager of the Auckland railways. On arrival at £he Hamilton station the Resident Engineer, ]$r D. M. Beere, and the contractors got on the engine. Several trucks were attached, and in these a number of people disposed themfeejlves, hoping to share the honour of being auiong the ft? sfc to cross the bridge in the fust train. A-i»ong them were some prominent citizens, and the disgust of the whole party may be imagined when they awoke to the fact that the engine had bew

disconnected, and was moving off without them. The engine crossed the bridge at the rate of about five miles an honr, and returned at a somewhat quicker rate, but no oscillation was observed. A large number of people witnessed tho trial trip. Measis Mullinger and Brett, who have been detained on account of the non-ariival of th» engine last week, will now push on the contract with all possible speed.

The following special messages to the Press Association, dated London, Feb. Ist, 2nd, and 3rd, have been published in the N.Z. Herald :-- Fully si\ty per cent, of the New Zealand frozen meat per Tonic was damaged by fire. — Acceding to the request of the Victorian •'Irovonimont, the Po-.fcmaster-Gener.il, Mr. Fawcett, has agreed to cancel the order requiring letters to bear special directions as to the rout" by which they are to be forwarded to Australia. — Mr Fawcett states that many thousands of letters and papers, obviously intended for transmission by the P. And 0. mailboats to Australia, are every week detained, owing to the regulations as to " specially addressed." — The London and Chartered Bank lo*.o £120,000 by the failures of Messrs Thomas, Sons, and Co. The money was advanced on fraudulent securities, but is fully covered by tlio amount of the reserved fund. An East Indian institution is also reported to havebeen victimised to the extent of £50,000 — The authorities of the London and Chartered Bank state that their loss by the frauds of Messrs Thomas, Sons and Co., does not exceed £!)0,000, which is more than covered by the reserve fund, invested in consols, and kept quite distinct from the bank's paid-up capital of £1,000,000.— A slight fall in the London Chattered Bank stock has taken place. — Sir Hercules Robinson will return to the (Governorship of the Cape shottlj'. — Australian wheat cargoes, for shipment, average 43s 3d, and for London direct 11s (id. Colonial wheat, ex store, is unchanged. — Le Temp-, says that the only effect of the recidiviste scheme will be to swell the ranks of ruffianism in the Pacific by the banishment thither of those whom it has been impossible to reform.

We are in receiot of European items of news, per the Bluff and Wellington, as under :— London, January 22.— Nothing definite will be done with respect to the proposed annexation r,f New Guinea until after the arrival of despatches from the Australian Governments with respect to the decision arrived at by tho Australian Convention which met in Sydney. The resolutions passed by the Convention, and which have been cabled to London, are, however, regarded as of great importance, and nnibt cairy weight with the Impeiial authorities dealing with the question. It is hoped that the .suspension of Messi.% Young and L.u-k, merchants, 5, Capthall Buildings, E.C., soft goods warehousemen of Sydney, with liabilities amounting to £205,000, will be only of a tempoiary character. It is probable that the creditor-, will grant the hrm time to meet their liabilities, as their colonial assets are ex pected to cover their debts.— Cairo, January 21. —Baker Pasha has been carrying on negotiations with a number of Arab Sheikhs, who have .shown themsehes favourable to the pretentious of Mahdi, and the ie->ult of his efforts has been so far successful that several of them have given in their submission to the Egyptian authorities. — Pauls, January 21. —The JAench aurhotities have promised to give full warning to natives of neutral nations resident in China befoie making any attack on the Chinese.

TUESDAY, FEB. J, ISBJ+.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
2,765

The Waikato Times AND THAMES VALLEY GAZETTE. Waikato Times, Volume XXII, Issue 1807, 5 February 1884

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working