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FAREWELL BALL TO THE GOVERNOR. (Condensed from the Herald )

We condense the following Account of the farewell ball ;n. jii on Mouda', last to in-, h vfelluiey •he G- hoi nor and Lidy \ J5)«("i In t..u <\ti2cii "1 Aui.';;.ir. 1 'iptiu weic lUl) tickets 1 ": t i:l"'lw.ni isw.l i'c iri'l to;k ,"!iu' in the Ohorrtl '''i.l ip t>U' i i-w 'C oi. a ii ney, Cniof Justioo j no donor tiie Su^o nteinluit, !i"< Worship the Mayor, Dr J. L. Campbell, Captains Duveney anl Eraser, Messrs 1). L. Murdoch, id. Morrm, L. D Nathan, G. B. Onen, Jamei Kussell, Thomas Russell, J. M. Sliera, B. Tonks. The ball wasopened by Lad} Bowen and his Honor the Chief Juslije, with Mrs Gillies and his Excellency the Governor. Tlieie ueie, we should think, nearly 400 ladies and gentlemen present. Uniforms were in great force, among which those of the officers ot the two ships ot war in harbour were conspicuous. The dancing was kept up w ith great spirit until midnight, when the company adjourned to the supperroom. The chair was taken by his Honor the Chief Justice, having his Excellency the Governor on the right, and Lady Bowen on the left. Xext to tho Go\ernor »at the lion, the Coloni.il Treasurer (Mr Vogel) and the lion the Defenco Minister (Mr McLean). On tho left, next to Lady Bowen sat his Honor the Superintendent and Mrs Gillies. Tho toasts of the Superintendent and Mayor were propote^" by Ins Excellency and responded to. The company then returned to the ball-room, and dancing was kept up till an early hour. His Honor the Chief Justice, supper being concluded, tea and said : Ladies and gentlemen, — I am about to call upon you to respond to a toast which, I thank God, stands first on the list m every society of England. Ladies and gentltmen, " The Health of our Gracious Sovereign tho Queen." Sho has had a long and prosperous reign, which, I believe, under tho blessings of providence, she- lms well deserved. Sue hts lived to see her children and her children's children prorporing — to see thorn occupying proud position* m vanoui parts of Europe. Long may nhc still continue to reign over us ; and long inaj she continue to concentrate upon hertclf the affectionate loyalty of tho whole of the people throughout hor vast dominion. — The toast was received and drunk wUh enthusiasm. His Honor next rose to propose " The health of hii Excellency Sir George Ferguson Bowen and Family." (Cheera .) Five long years have passed away since his Excellency and Lady Bowen came- to this colony, and this assembly M ill, I am sure, tell me presently, with their cheers, whether 1 they are not conscious that his Excellency and his gracious lady have won the respect, the loyalty, and affection of all classei in the colony. (Cheers.) Ladies and gentlemen — I am not about to detain you by any attempt at a laborod panegyric upon the character of his 'Excellent}}. That would be tho worst form I could alopt to show the loyalty ond devotion to them winch I feel mmy lic.rt. We have asked him and his gracious lady to u-.it as this evening, and not that they should hear a studied panegyric, or that we sheuld speak that praise which in their absence it would give us the greatest pleasure to convey. We have asked them that they would be pleased to give us the honor of their company, in order that they might receive from us assurance of the regret wo feel that we are so soon about to lose thorn. A few words only I will use in adverting to the career of the Governor in this c jlony Men aj o apt to forget the era of pain and sorrow, nnd to clmg to the consciousness of present enjoyment. We may not all recollect what was the state of the colony when his Excellency arrived here. I happened myself to be coming up the coast about that time, and witnessed some of tho sorrows and desolation which some of the colonists had just experienced. I haTe, not forgotten the affpeting scene on the Ta-wera schooner, which I saw bearing down and trying to cross the steamer in which 1 then was. I have not forgotten seeing the signals of distress, nor what I »u.w when she succeeded in crossing our path. I Baw miserable women, who had been bereft of their children, come, with tho few littlo sticks of furniture they possessed, on board our vessel. I bare not forgotten their coming on deck, and in answer to our inquiry of what had happened, telling us of what was afterwards known as tho Poverlv Bay Massacre. I recollect the active measures that were afterwards taken. And recol» lee! ing these things, I am led to contrast that state of things with the condition of tho colony at the present hour. I may be permitted to ask whether his Excellency leaves the country in a different condition now from that in which he then found it? It is but a few hours ago since I law a largo number of native chief*, who would then have sympathised w ith the authors of tho?e trouble*, casting their matt at hi* feet m token of their respect for his character. Nor can I forget the otato of commercial depression tinder which this colony w as lnbour'mg, nor avoid contrasting it with its present condition. Having observed those things, I can, therefore, congratulal c his Excellency that he is able to leavo tho colony in tho position which it occupies to-dny. (Cheers) It is not, inJeed, to speak upon political subjects, or upon tho Government of the colony, that we have awinbled here this evening. We wish, rather, lo pn\ a hlbute to Sir George Bowen on account of hit social qualities ; and in so doing, I feel thnt wo nluo recognise the loss which eviry lady in the colony will feel when bereft of Jtlie »ocie f y of Lady Bowen. I bol'ote if to be a sreat blessm;* to any c nninunity when its •ocun "! ioil bv :t lii'h of In: 1 ) e'lnui-i-ei, and of refined and ,mili«'h"l mniniMM (i."nrcf ) A Lily who is at the same n ,K> it f, .mi 1 t ) Ihe T n. a>i«l i <pW~> hcself acceptable to all i- i■<oftV pn >'i> (LiU'l f leora ) I ask iou by tho pinnniT in winch }ou will re-pond to the toast I i»m about to propose, to recognise the jur-tico of the sentiments I have uttered. I will ask jou to drink, " The health of Sir George Ferguson Bowen, Lady Bowrn, and their family." — The toast was drunk nmid loud and protract od cheering. His Excellency, on rising to respond to the toast, was received with cheers. He said : Ladies nnd gentlemen, — On behalf of Lady Bowen and myself I thnnk hit Honor the Cliipf Justice, who has always been our kind and constant friend, for the terms with which ho has proposed our health. And I thank you all for the manner in which 3011 hare re* sponded. Allow mo to say, now tho time has como when I have to yield into other hands the high and honorable trust which I received from my Sovereign, it is tho greatest consolation to me that I am leaving it in tho hands of 10 able, so popular, and so experienced a public servant as Sir G. A. Arney. (Cheera.) It is also a great consolation that lam able to leave the colony in so prosperous a state as it now is, and so different from what I found it five }ears ago. There was this difference, perhaps bctwon our reception during our tour through tho South Island and our visits to Auckland : In the South wo were not very much known personally, and marks of respect and esteem were perhaps shown more to tho office which I held than to myself individually. But hero in Auckland, where we have been going m and out among you for so long a period, wo have been known and recognised as one of 3 ourselves. Oue of my children was born here, and this circumstance will form a strong tie of spmpathy between my family and Auckland, nere we have been accustomed to flatter ourselves that your retpect and sympathy were not to the Governor only, but to the individual; not only to the office which I hold, hut to Sir George and Lady Bowen. (Choeri ) Socially, we have endeavoured to make Government House what Government House ought to be — a neutral ground on which men of all parties can meet and forget their differences for a season. We can say that we leaive her* without the consciousness, of a single duty wilfully neglected, or a single enmity provoked. (Cheers ) We lcare it with thousands of friends, we trust, and in this respect there is perfect reciprocity. If we have enemies, then, teeing that n\ it St. Patrick's Day, I will say, with the Irishman, that the rociproc'ty is all on the ono side. (Cheers and laughter.) But, ladies and gentlemen, I do not. feel tempted to address you in any festive strain. I feel th.it the shadow of parting is upon us A few hour*, nnd my ofllci il connection with tnit beaut f.tl country shall hiv e craved. But we shall not pan from each other's memory. We (Lady Bowen, and myself) will cherish tho recollection of those personal friends from whom we luvo always received the greatest of kindtvess and hospitality, and in whose happiness and prosperity wo shall always rejoice. Let me now, for mysolf, and on behalf oS my wife, bid you an affectionate farewell God bless you all, and tho dear land in which you live. His Excellency resumed his seat amid cheering. The toast was drunk with the usual honor?.

(Condensed from the Star.)

The day of doparture of Ilia Excellency from New Zenlaiid was fortunately a fine one. Thoro was also sufficient ttind to allow of the part of the programme which provided for an aquntic demonstration by the Auckland Yacht Club. The streets presented a very holiday appearance. A triumphal arch was erected nt tlie town end of the wharf by tho Harbour Board. Its effect to the oye was very pltming. It had tho follow.ng inscription in tho centre, surrounded by evergreens: — Sin Gkoroe Bowev. Y. R Laby Bowen. Y. R. Nina, Aonfs, Gkokgk, Zok, Al*mda. At one o'clock barriers were erected to stop the general traffic on the wharf. All the vessels in harbour w»re gidy dressed m bunting. The yachts belonging to the Auckland Yacht Club lay at their anchorage dressed m flags. Shortly after three o'clock the Hon. J. Vogel led Lady Bowen out on to the bnlcony of Government House, and handed her ladyship into the carriage His Excellency, accompanied hv Sir George Aniey, followed, and tho Defence Minister, his Honor tlie Superintendent, und his Worship tho Mayor also c.nne out and took their seats in their respect Up carriages. His Excellency stood up in the carriage, and addressing the large assembly suid : "I \\U]\ to thank >ou, the people of Auckland for tho kindness which hm been shown to mo by the inhabitants of this city, and for the hearty demonstration of to-day. My heart in too full to nay anymore just now, but may God ever bless yon." His Excellency, who appeared to be much affected, §at down amidst fnmnltoils circling nnd wavniir of h«ii«. Tlio o.uriagos wi>rf oei'iipiutl L»,\ tito following grrlomrn :•<- ! First carriage; His Excellency the Goxeinor, Laiiy Bowen, j Sir G-i'o. Arney, and Captain Pitt. ! Second carnage. Captain M.icluU and tlie Gotcrnor'i fciunK. j

Third cernaje : His Warship the Mayor, Councillor t Prime, Hurst, and the Town Clerk. Fourth carriage ; Tlio lion the Colonial Treasurer and the j Defence Minister, and his Honor the Superintendent. Fifth carriage : T. Becklmm, Esq , R.M., the P. N. Cornford, aud how. J. Willianibon. [ Sixth carriage: Messrs J. Williamson, O'Neill Luckie, and Kelly, member* of the General Assembly. Seventh carriage : Mr White, American «onsul ; D. B. Crnieksliank, French Consul ; and Colonel Balneavi*. When tho Tice-regal party had taken their seats the carriages moved on towards tho Princes street gate. Upon reaching the wharf the procession halted in front of the platform, erected at the lower end of Queen-street. The Cavalry drew up in front of the platform. His Excellency alighted from the carriage amidst loud cheering, when his Worship tho Ma) or stepped forward and read the following address :—: — " To His Excellency Sir George Ferguson Bowen, G.C.M.G, Governor and Commander-m-Chief of New Zealand. " May it please your Excellency — " We the Major, Councillors, and Citiiens of the city of Auckland beg to express our regret on the departure from New Zealand of your Excellency, Lady Bowen and family, Wo are deepy sensible of the valuable services rendered by your Excellency to the colony during your Excellency's adIrimistration as Goyernor, and \ie leel that by your Excellency's removal n great loss is sustained by tho city of Auckland and the colony generally. At the same time we congralatc your Excellency on the especial mark of favour evinced by our Gracious Sovereign in appointing your Excellency to so important a Government as that of Victoria. In bidding your Excellency farewell we heartily wish that every happinoss that tho Dispenser of all Good can bestow may attend your Excellency nnd Lady Bowen and family. " Sißuci «n Sohalf of tho Corporation of the City of Auckland " P: A, Philips, " Major ; " F. Brodie, Town Cl»rk." Hit Worship said : " Allow rat to add that this address very poorly pourtray* the feelings which the peopl* of Auckland entertain towards your Excellency, aud I w iah you every prosperity in the future." His Excellency tin- Uovemor, in reply, said :—: — u Mr Mayor and Gentlemen, — " I shall always hold in grateful remembrance the hearty welcome which the citizens of Auckland gave me on my first arrival here five years ago, not less their hearty farewell on my final departure from this country. " I assure you that Lady Bowen and I will never forget what was so long our happy home in your fair city, nor the fact that one of our children is by birth a citizen of Auckland." " In my reply to one of the addresses presented to me here on my first landing I expressed a hope that we should leave New Zealand ' w ithout the consciousness of a single duty wilfully neglected, or of a single enmity wilfully provoked".' ft is a great »atiafaction to feel that this hope has been fulfilled. In conclusion, Mr Mayor and Gentlemen, I thank you for the constant courtesy and respect shown me by the Corporation of Auckland, and I pray that the blessing of Providence may re»t on this City and Province and on tho whole Colony of New Zealand," At the conclusion of the reading of the address md reply there was loud cheering. His Worship tho Mayor called for three times three for hu Excellency and Lady Bowen, which Were heartily given. The Governor called for three cheers for J Auckland, which was also warmly responded to. His Excellency then walked down the wharf accompanied by Sir George A. Arney and Lady Bowen, leaning on the arm of his Worship the Mayor. The various friendly societies now moved forward on to the wharf, and took their positiou on either side, forming an avenne between which the Governor and his suite passed. The various companies of Volunteers were drawn up in line at the end of the wharf aa a guard of honour. Ai his Excellency and esteemed lady stepped from the carriage tho Volunter band played the National Anthem amidst great cheering. After the vice-regal pas.y had embarked the visitors on board were ordered ashore. The Hero steamed away from the wharf during a lalutc of aeTentoen gum from Fort Bntomart.

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Bibliographic details

FAREWELL BALL TO THE GOVERNOR. (Condensed from the Herald ), Waikato Times, Volume III, Issue 135, 20 March 1873

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FAREWELL BALL TO THE GOVERNOR. (Condensed from the Herald ) Waikato Times, Volume III, Issue 135, 20 March 1873

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