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REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER ON ROAD TRACKS, MAN AWATU TO MOROA AND SEVENTY-MILE BUSH.

Manawatu, Bth December, 1866. Sib, — t have the honor to report to you that in accordance with the request of yourself and Mr Fitzherbert, the Crown Lands Commissioner, tbnt I should see about a road line to tho Moroa in tho Forty-Mile Bush, I left Maaterton on the 14th November with Mr Buird, Assistant Engineer, and Mr Kelleher, Assistant Surveyor, and proceeded to Rangitumu Hill with the object of getting a general view of the country towards the Moroa from its top. On passing through the Hau Hau native camp near its foot, 1 found, after enquiry, that there hud been an old track leading to the Moroa from Masterton. Passing up a spur towards the Ahiarahe Hill, and crossing the ridge between it and the Rangitumu, and proceeding on to Moroadownthenorthorn slope?, crossdngthehead of tho Wangaeliu stream, and following the valley of the Ihuraua stream to tho Moroa, and from the native description, presenting no great difficulties as a road line. Having got one of the older natives to go u,p the hill, we proceeded up to the top, and he pointed out the line. I consider that the cutting and traversing of this line should be the first operation iv connection with the Moroa survey, taking care to lay it out so as to tuke as good a lino for a road as can be found, and pegs and ranging pegs, with marked and numbered trees could be left at stated intervals on the line, so as, if thought desirable, they should indicate the frontage pegs of sections along both sides of the road, which Bections might be from 25 to 40 chains wide by a mile in depth. From the top of Bangitumu the open spurs of the Moroa are visible in several points which will facilitate the survey operations, and as some of these spurs are also visible from several of the stations on hills near Knight's run, the Surveyor will be able to connect tho Moroa survey to tho general survey of the district. Several of the hills on the lower part of the Tararua range, lying along the boundary of tho Upper or Ahuaturauga Block, on the Manawatu river, are visible both from Rangitumu and the Moroa, and also from the nills referred to near Knight's run, so that probably a connection of the triangulation of the East and West Coast may here be found practicable. On tho 15th I left Masterton and proceeded with Mr Baird and Mr Kelleher by the Taueru to the Moroa. Mr Kelleher put up two stations on hills at either end of the valley, both open to the station on Rangitumu. The flat here is Jong and irregular, and nob of great area, small valleys open out from it on both sides, and the flat land is bounded by open fern ridges, receding into the bush covered hilly land. The eastern portion of the flat is rather stony ; the western portion appears to be good soil. The soil on the hills is very good, both on the open and on tho bush hills. Owing to the length of carriage from either Masterton or Castle Point, I do not think settlers would find fifty acre soctions a desirable size, but as a step towards opening up the large and valuable country in this neighborhood L would suggest that the Moroa might be laid out thus : — A road line to be laid off to the best advantage along the centre of the valley and from this on both sides forty to fifty acre sections, extending say thirty to thirty-five chains back, and an access to water secured to each, and cross lines of road I where the country will allow, at say one and a half to two miles apart. To each of these sections to be attached a section of 300 to 600 acres laid out on tho adjoining open and bush hills, and a site fov a township might be reserved for future use. The details of the arrangement of tho sections to be left to tho surveyor on the ground. The road line along the valley would connect with the line before indioated from Maeterton, and which might be made into a bridle track, and from the eastern end of the valley the road line might bo continued to the Whareama nearly by the present track through to land purchased by' Mr Bridges on the Taueru and Whareama, and following down the Whareama to join the Castle 1 Point Road at Tinui ; and this line wculd aho benefit the settlers in the Whareama and To Rau Meafblockfli , In connection with the survey of tbe Moroa Ij would 'suggest the advisability, from 'this 'convex aw# starting point, of wjjyipg a trorero Use

through the Forty-Mile Bush; tamMy to. the set* tlemewt of Tutaekara oil the. present Forty-Jtfi),© Buahtrack to Manawatu,qnd,Ahunri, and fronv thence nearly along the present Foity-Mile Bueh track to the Opaki. „ . , This would, if properlj done, by having native* acquainted with the names of creeks, rivers, .old settlements, &o, afford what/is much wauted, namely, accurate information and a general plan of locality of several native blocks, which are ■wholly or partially sold to Government, and the knowledge of which is now very vague. Should this be done, I should also get a line taken from the Manawatu survey to the same point of Tutaekara, which would give similar information as to the blocks in treaty for sale, and ! afford a connection of the surveys. The natives inform me that old tracks exist on these lines I have indicated, and that they present no great difficulties for bridle roads, and the tra- j verse lines should therefore be so laid out as to ; afford as good Jines as can be found for that purr pose, a 8 the future opening out of bridle tracks would be of much importance. I would suggest, therefore, that in these surveys this object be kept in view, and available road lines found at samo time as the survey proceeds, and that for this purpose the District Engineer give his advice and assistance to the surveyor. I append a sketch of the country from native information. From the Moroa I proceeded to Castle Point, and saw the new line of road from the Tinui to the Whakataki, •which has been laid off in a very creditable manner by Mr Baird. It would very deßirable that this lino should be continued soon*, on (he one end to Castlo Point, and on the other across the Whareama and over the spur to the Mangakeha stream, which would open it up for the use of the Whareama settlers. I returned by the vallej of the Mangapakeha stream, up which it is proposed to continue the road, and which affords a good line for thiß purpose. — I have, &c, John T. Sxbwabt, Provincial Engineer. To his Honor I. E. Featherston, Superintendent, Wellington. 1 I

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WI18670611.2.17

Bibliographic details

REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER ON ROAD TRACKS, MANAWATU TO MOROA AND SEVENTY-MILE BUSH., Wellington Independent, Volume XXII, Issue 2530, 11 June 1867

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REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER ON ROAD TRACKS, MANAWATU TO MOROA AND SEVENTY-MILE BUSH. Wellington Independent, Volume XXII, Issue 2530, 11 June 1867

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