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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

The Panama Service.— We publish elsewhere full details relative to the Panama Service which is announced to commence in June. It will be seen that a chief cabin passage from Wellington to Southampton, and vice versa will cost £100, and a second class £60. The details given will repay perusal. New Zealand Steam Navigation Company. — The half-yearly general meeting of the shareholders of the above company will be held in the hall of the Mechanics' Instituto, at 2 o'clock, in tho afternoon of Monday next, the 30th inst., when an election of four directors will take place, and an auditor will be re-appointed. The halfyeai'ly report will also be presented on tho occasion. Tho balance-sheet of the Company is already in tho hands of tho shareholders, and presents a highly satisfactory appearance. Last half-year's receipts amount to £15,153 10s. 9d. ; expenditure, £39,564 83. 7d. £5,000 going to the depreciation account leaves a balance to tho credit of profit and loss of £5,589 2s. 2d., which, with a balance of £75 6s. 6d. from the previous halfyear, leaves an amount of £5,664 10s. Bd. The ship property of the Company is valued at £71,089 15s. Bd., and 011 account of tho new steamer Taranaki £14,611 18s. 3d. has been remitted to England. Tho expenses of management for the half-year being only £931, 63. lOd. shows that the affairs of tho Company aro regulated with judgment and a duo regard to economy. Bishop Selwyn. — His Lordship tho Bishop of New Zealand was a passenger to Auckland, on Thursday evening, in the s.s. Wellington. Immigrants. — The Government immigrants, who arrived in this colony by tho ship Berar, Captain Hall, from London are reminded by an advertisement which, appsaivi elsewhere, that the moiety of their passage monies is due on the 10th May. Debtors and Creditors. — The petitions (under tho Debtors and Creditors Act) of Win. Bannister, jun., Samuel Dickson, and John Rose, are ordered for hearing before the Supremo Court, at 10 o'clock, in tho forenoon of Tuesday, Bth May. Volunteering in the Hutt. — A meeting of the members of the Hutt Volunteer Company has been convened to bo held in tho Mechanics' Institute, Lower Hutt, at 2 o'clock, to-morrow afternoon. As some very important business has to be transacted, the attendance of tho whole of the members is particularly requested. The Hutt Market. — Tho usual monthly market held at tho Lower Hutt, is announced for Wednesday next, the 2nd May. Mr. John 11. Horncr has been instructed to offer for sale upon the occasion some valuable dairy stock, a mob of horses, some prime fat bullocks, and a fine lot of sheep. Volunteer Artillery Company. — We have been asked what steps are being taken for the formation of a Volunteer Artillery Company in this City ? Wo believe that it is the intention of the Committee appointed at the recent public meeting, to look over the rules and regulations of the Queensland Volunteer Artillery, for the purpose of drawing up a code of regulations for the proposed corps in this City. The rules when approved by tho Committee, will be submitted at a public meeting, to be called at a future day for the purpose. The GARRtCK Club. — Damon and Pythias, j and a farco will be reproduced by the Garrick Club, I at the Odd Fellows' Hall,on Tuesday evening next. The proceeds of the entertainment on Tuesday evening will bo devoted to the benefit of the Wardrobe Fund, on which there has been a heavy ' drain, consequent on tho production of such pieces as " Damon and Pythias." From the great success which attended the first production of this piece wo anticipate a very full house on Tuesday night. A Schooner tor Sale. — The well-known clipper coasting schooner Joanna, twenty-six tons register, with sails and gear complete, as she now lies in the harbor will be offered to public competition on Thursday next, the 3rd May. Tho salo will be held by Mi-. G. H. Vennell, at the stores of Mr. Edward Pearce, and tho schooner will be hauled alongside the wharf in rear of his premises, three days previous to the sale, for the iuspection of persons intending to purchase.

Detention ■op Steameks.— The steamships Airedale for the North and Lady Bird for the South aro detained, by order of tho Government, until Monday. The Wellington Savings Bank.— By a statement of the assets and liabilities of tho Wellington Savings Bank on the 31st March, which ' is published in the last Provincial Government Gazette, we notice that the assets amount to £4,407 15s. The number of deposit accounts open to the 31=t Dec, 1865, were 194, and 53 , were added during the March quarter, giving a total of 247. Twenty-nine deposit accounts were closed during tho quarter, and tho number of current accounts now in tho Bank are 218. . Ownerless Dogs. — Since the late raid of the police on all unregistered dogs, numerous canine quadrupeds have found no one whom they can call master. The men that owned thoin know them no more — either pass them with a stare of unrccognition, pat them by stealth, or stare vacantly when they frisk round them waiting a nod. Pug, poodle, mastiff, and mongrel look in vain for some one to throw thorn the accustomed bone, or the debris of a dinner. With tails betweon their legs they lui'k in street corners, and wistfully wonder why they aro neglected. Out of compassion, some philanthropic dog fancior should register them all, and we should then see tliem frisk and frolic as in days of yore. Vanishing Carte de Visite. — By the last mail from England, we received an extraordinary puzzle. Like all novelties and tricks for winter evenings, this trick is very entertaining. A carte de visite is placed in a sheet of note paper, which is neatly folded over it. The directions for playing the trick aro very simple. They are as follows : — Gontly open fold after fold of tho note paper in which the carte te visite has previously been placed. Then quietly fold it up again, requesting the lookers-on to keep their eyes upon it. In a moment, quickly whisk it behind you into the left hand, and turn it over while so doing. Open tho folds of tho paper as before, and the card, to the great astonishment of the spectators, will have vanished ! A Challenge. — We havo been requested to stato that a gentleman in this city is willing to challenge anyone to play a kw friendly games o£ chess. In Wellington there should bo some players who will accept the gauntlet thrown down, and we hope to see the match come off. A.ny person desirous of taking up the challenge can obtain all particulars on application at this office, whero all preliminaries can bo arranged. If a chess club, such as is to bo found in nearly every other Province, could be organised in this City, great amusement could be found for the long winter evenings now coming on. Pablo Fanque. — The interesting entertainments of Pablo Fanquo and his Lilliputian troupe took place yesterday evening at Barry's Ship Hotel, Manners-street. The performance will be repeated this evening, and then tho artistes will visit Wanganui, performing afc Johnsonville, Porirua, Pahautanui, Waikanae, Otaki, Manawatu, Bangitikei, and Turakina, en route. This morning, Pablo's travelling marquee will bo erected and exhibited to the public in Willisstreet, on tho vacant piece of ground adjoining the stores o£ Messrs. Port and Young, and almost immediately opposite tho Union Bank of Australia. Cartage. — Tenders addrosscd to the Chairman of tho Town Board will bo received at tho Board Room, Lambton Quay, until noon on Friday, tho 4th May, from persons desirous to undcrtako tho carting required by tho Commissioners for six months, commencing from the 7th May. Clerical.— We learn that tho Archdeaconry of Christchurch, has bee conferred upon tho Eev. EC. AY. Harper, M.A., of Morton College, Oxford. Consul. — The London Gazette of January 26, contains the following notification: — Foreignoffice, Jan. 24. — The Queen has been pleased to appoint Don Santiago Burtt as Consul at Auckland, for tho Republic of Chili." Steam Plough. — Canterbury is going to try steam cultivation, as we learn from the Press that by Messrs. Shaw, Savill & Co.'a next ship for New Zealand, " David Brown" will be sent to Port Lyttelton, for W. A. Willes, Esq., of Christchurch Canterbury, a complete set of steam ploughing apparatus, including a novel and powerful traction engine, manufactured by tho well known agricultural engineers and ploughmakers — James and Frederick Howard, Bedford. Tho engino was exhibited at the Smithfield Cattle Show in December last, where, from its novelty of construction and excellence of design, it excited considerable attention amongst farmers and engineers. It is considered the most remarkable invention introduced of late years. The boiler is placed across tho framework instead of lengthwise, which maintains an almost unvarying water level, no matter how steep the gradient which it has to ascend. The apparatus is intended for tho cultivation of a large tract of land for sheep pasture, tho enterprising purchasor considering, as we have been informed, that at tho present high rate of labor in tho colony, ho can economise at least 10s. an acre by the use of steam power in cultiration, besides having the work dono so much quicker. i Wreck of the s.s. Jeddo.— Tho following somewhat fuller telegram than that already published, has been received by Mr. Eeuter from tho Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, dated February 11 : — " The company's mail steamship Joddo left Hong Kong on tlio 15th January. She only arrived at Point do Gallo, landed there all her passengers, mail, and cargo for Europe, and proceeded to Bombay. On tho night of the 2nd instant the Jeddo ran upon the Choul Kadu shoal, about fifteen miles south of Bombay. She had on board two passengers only, 76 boxes of specie, and a general cargo for China. Two of tho company's steamers were immediately sent to her assistance, and at tho date of tho latest telrgram (sth inst.) all mails, with tho passengers and specie, and 200 packages of the cargo, lmd been landed a', Bombay. 700 packages of merchandise, remaining still on board, are more or less damaged. The company's agent telegraphs— " I do not think the ship can fco saved."

Sale of Five Shilling Land in theWaieabapa District. — In a Provincial Government Gazette published on Tuesday, it is notified that several allotments of land situate in the Rangi" tumau Block, in the Wairarapa district, will be put up for sale by public auction at the Crown Lands Office, Thorndon, at one o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday, the 21st May. The "Canterbury Standard." — By the s.s. Auckland we received a prospectus to the effect that the copywright and plant of tho Canterbury Stamlanl having passed into the hands of a new ; proprietor, it is proposed to establish a first-class Daily Evening Journal in Canterbury, of the same size as the Standard, namely, four full-sized pages of bix columns each ; tho price per copy to be one j penny. The Hokitika Gaol.— -Telegrams from Hokitika, under date tho 24th inst., published in the Lytlelton Times say : — " An indignation meeting has boon held in the Prince of Wales Opera House, respecting tho state of tho public gaol. Tho principal citizens attended. Resolutions condemning the Government were passed. Twentythree prisoners have been removed from tho old to tho now gaol." The Archdeacon op Hokitika. — The Canterbury Press of tho 25th inst. says : — " A curious mistako has occurred in the English papers, which has been copied into the local press, to tho effect that the Rev. H. Harper has been appointed Archdeacon of Christchurch. The rev. gentleman has been appointed to bo Archdeacon of Hokitika. la it possible that the collectors of ecclesiastical intelligence for the London press may have thought it unlikely that church dignataries should be created in a district in which it has not hitherto been thought worth whilo to place a resident clergyman ? One or two clergymen have paid visits of what may be called an itiuerant character to the population of some 110,000 persons on the West Coast, but; that is the sum total of tho attention which tho subject appears to have received from tho Episcopal Church of Canterbury. Let us hope, however, that the appointment of an Archdeacon where there are no clergy may be like the appointment of a Colonel to an independent corps in India which has no existence, and where tho Colonel is appointed first with orders to raise the regiment. In any other light the creation of an Archdeacon at Hokitika would be a cruel satire on the way in which the Church has performed its duties there." The Late Provincial Auditor. — The Lyttelton Times of the 25th inst. says : — " Mr. William Thomson, whose death wo recorded a few days ago, was buried, yesterday afternoon, in tho Papanui Cemetery. Tho deceased gentleman held the rank of Captain in the Canterbury Yeomanry Cavalry, and in consequence tho funeral was conducted with military honors. A strong body of the Cavalry, and representatives of all tho other provincial corps attended the ceremony, and ren" dered it more than usually solemn and impressive. About 3 p.m., tho funeral procession left Seottstown, the late residence of the deceased, the band playing the Dead March iv Saul. A firing party from the Cavalry, with arms reversed, preceded tho coffin, which was borne upon an Armstrong 12-pounder gun-carriage, from which the gun had been dismounted, and which was drawn by four horses, conducted by the Lyttelton battery of Artillery. The coffin was covered with the Union Jack in place of a pall ; and the pallbearers wore six officer? of tho Volunteers of equal rank with the deceased, namely — Captains Fuller, Ward, Packe, Steward, Cracroft Wilson, C.8., and Moorhonso. On the coffin were displayed the accoutrements ; and in tho rear the charger of tho deceased officer, caparisoned according to rule, was led by two members of the troop that had been under his command. Tho members of tho family and other mourners immediately followed ; next in procession came the Volunteers of all corps, in uniform, but unarmed ; and behind, in carriages, on horseback, and on foot, an almost endless train of the friends and fellow-colonists of the deceased, together with tho principal members of tho Government, brought up the rear. The cortege moved in military slow time to Papanui Church, at tho gate of which it was met by the Lord Bishop of tho Diocese, who read the first sentences of the Burial Service of the English Church. At the termination of tho psalm and lesson appointed by the ritual, which were read in the Church, the coffin w.is taken into the Churchyard, where the remaining part of the servico was read. During this portion of the ceremony, the firing party of twelve of the Yeomanry stood around the grave, with their arms reversed, and when the service was ended, they fired tlirce volleys over tho grave. Besides thoso who took part in tho eeremonyj the funeral was witnessed by a considerable number of persons, who thronged the Papanui-road, testifying their respect to the bereaved family." What Government intends doing in tiie WaikatO. — Mr. Williamson has recently held meetings in tho Waikato, and explained tho intentions of the Auckland Provincial Government most fully to the settlers. Ho said that two engineers had been directed to mako a plan of the best means of uniting the settlements by a road to Auckland, and that tenders would bo called for tho performance of tho work. He explained to thorn tho impossibility of tho Government granting them Crown titles to their land until the expiration of the proper time, and tho fulfilment of the requirements. lie found that if Crown grants were now given, tho men would realise and leave the placo ; for it had come to his knowledge that numbers had already mortgaged their acres. The forty-acre English immigrants would also join tho Government immigrants in road-making. TnE Habeas Corpus Act. — It may be interesting to our readers to know that the Habeas Corpus Act was passed in the reign of Charles 11, in 1679. It provides that no British subject can be kept in prison beyond a certain period without a public examination of tho charges brought against him. It has been occasionally suspended in cases of extreme emergency, such as the Fenian disturbance in Ireland j but then only by the . consent of Parliament. To the best of our recollection, the last time it Avas proposed to suspend it was in 1794, when tho great Pitt made a motion to that effect, in consequence of a message from the King.

The Loss of the London, — The official inquiry into the loss of the London closed on February 14. After a deal of technical evidence had been given, the Rev. R. Or. Benson, who had a brother on board the vessel, Mas called. This gentleman said he went to Bee tho London when she was at Plymouth on sth of January last. His brother was with him, who afterwards went out in the ship. It struck him that she was very low in the water for a passenger vessel, and a remark was made by the boatman who conveyed him to that effect. He had seen the ship some days previously, and when he saw it again on January sth he was surprised to find how much lower she was in tho water. After parting with his brother he wrote home to his father, and in that letter he mentioned about the ship being low in the water. He noticed a good deal of coal on deck, packed m bags and placed in tiers. He said to his brother, " How on earth is the hatchway protected if a heavy sea comes in ?" He thought nothing further, however, about it, as he knew that he was not acquainted with sailors' work. The decks were wet, and ho had a cpnversation with a sailor, who said that he thought he was going in a dry vessel, but ho had been wet through almost from the time she left London. Captain Roe, a magistrate of Devon, and formerly in the service of Messrs. Wigram, was called to speak to the seamanship of Captain Martin, whom ho knew well. His opinion was that Captain Martin was in every respect a most excellent officer. He had a perfect knowledge of all that related to navigation, and was most zealous and attentive to the discharge of his duties. This closed the evidence, and Mr. O'Dowd, on behalf of the Board of Trade, said he trusted it had been fully proved, to tho satisfaction of the court and the puMic, that every possible means had been used to throw some light upon the causes and the circumstances attending this lamentable accident. Tho court had exumined a large number of survoyors and professional men as to the utructure of tho ship, and these surveyors were bound to make a true and proper report as to the' ship's condition at the time they inspected her. This and other evidence went to prove that at tho time the ship left Plymouth the requirements of the Passengers' Act had been complied with. The evidence of the crew was somewhat confused, and he was not so well satisfied with it. He must say that in making this investigation he had received from Messrs. Wigram every assistance and co-operation that could possibly be given. — The Rev. R. G. Benson observed, as tho inquiry had now terminated, he wished to acknowlege the courtesy that the relatives of the doceased persons had received from the court ; at the same time, he could not but express his regret that the magistrate had decided that counsel who had appeared on behalf of such witnesses should not be allowed to cross-examine the witnesses. He believed that, had such a courso been adopted, it would have been as much to tho interest of the Messrs. Wigram as to that of tho relatives, and would have been more satisfactory to all parties. — Mr. Traill complimented the officers of the Board of Trade as to the manner in which they had placed the case before the court, and said that after tho mass of evidence which had been received, and tho numerous points which required careful consideration, it would be some time before he should be enabled to mako his official report. Sir Huan Rose and the Fenians. — The Morning Herald makes the following statement : — " It is rumored in Parliamentary circles that Sir Hugh Rose has demanded further instructions from the Government with regard to his duty in Ireland. Sir Hugh says that ho has the example of Governor Eyre before his eyes ; that ho knows how to put down a rebellion, but that he cannot act without further orders." Gold win Smith.— The following items referring to this well-known writer of the Umpire letters aro from the homo papers : — Professor Goldwin Smith writes a letter to the Daily News t again urging that tho Alabaira claims should be submitted to arbitration, and hoping that Parliament will take the matter into serious consideration. Tho Oxford Undergraduate's Journal says : — " We fear there is too much truth in the rumor that the eminent Etonian, Mr. Goldwin Smith, of University College, is about to resign tho Regius Professorship of Modern History. It is said that he will leave this post, which he has hold with ho much distinction to himself and his University, in order to recruit his own health, and to attend on a revered relation, whose illness has proved alarming." Petroleum:. — According to tho American official account of tho export of petroleum from all the ports to all the world up to the 31st July of each year, tho number of gallons for the last three years were:— lß6s, 7,010,650; 1864, 15,071,581 18C3, 15,105,844. Episcopal Opinions on the Pentateuch. — Tho Archbishop of Canterbury (says tho London Spectator) ha 3 given an illustration of the small value which attaches, as tho Dean of Westminster observes, to Episcopal opinions on the Pentateuch, by writing to Dr. Colenso that ho believes him to bo " duly and canonieally deposed from his spiritual offico, according to the common law of tho Church of Christ, as set forth in tho concluding paragraph of tho 26th article of the Church of England." Now, the words referred to are, "Nevertheless it appertainoth to the discipline of the Church that enquiry be made of evil ministers, and that they be accused by those that have knowledge of their offences, and finally , being found guilty, by just judgment deposed. 1 ' The whole urticlc, the last clause included, expressly refers to " wicked" ministers, and bears on discipline, not on doctrine. Does tho Archbishop think that Dr. Colenso is a ivicTced man for disbelieving that Moses wrote the Pentateuch? Does he think him so wicked, for instance, as tho Bishop of Capetown, who asked tho Propagation Society to strengthen his hands against tho Bishop of Natal, by paying only those clergyman (in the Diocese of Natal) whoso demands were endorsed by him, and then, when , taxed with this shabby proceeding, denied that it had any but a financial purpose ? New Zealand Trust and Loan Company. — At a meeting of the above company held in London, on the 18th February, a dividend at the rate of £1 per share was declared.

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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS., Wellington Independent, Volume XXI, Issue 2354, 28 April 1866

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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS. Wellington Independent, Volume XXI, Issue 2354, 28 April 1866

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