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GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. MONDAY, JOLY 14TH, 1862. The members of the Legislative Council met to-day at 2 o'clock. The housa was unusually full and most of the ladies and gentlemen of Welling--weie present. The Speaker of the other house then entered followed by the members of the House of Representatives, and amidst profound silence and order. Sir George Grey rose and very emphatically read the SPBKCH. Honourable Gentlemen of the Legislative Council, and Gentlemen ojt this House or Representatives, — 1. Since the last Session of the General Assembly a great calamity in the death ofher illust rious Consort Prince Albeit, has befallen Her Most Gfacious Majesty. This sad event has touched the heart of Her people in every part of Her dominions. I take this the earliest public opportunity of expressing that deep and respectful sympathy for Her Majesty which 1 am well aware is shared by the inhabitants of New Zealand, aod which has been fully shewn by the numerous addresses of condolence which have already been transmitted to Her Majesty. 2. I have great satisfaction in meeting for the first time since my return to this Colony, the General Assembly, which is so important a branoh of those institutions of self government which have been bestowed upon it by the Imperial Parliament. During my absence from the Colony I bate watched with deep interest the working of those institutions, and on my return have been much gratified by witnessing the result. Th© progreoa of the Colony as a whole appears to have been steady and rapid ; settlements which at the > period of my leaving, were in their earliest infancy, have grown into populous, wealthy and flourishing Provinces, exhibiting a healthy vitality which appears attributable in no small degree to the large amount of local self-govern-ment TB*-hich forma ao prominent an element in the Constitution of the Colony.

3. But while there is so much, room for congnWulfttion to be found in the general progress " of the Colony, the junsotisfactory relations ywhich h#ve grown up between 9 portion of the Maori race ?*nd the Government are -o source of deep regret. In the attempt #hich it is my . duty to mafce to restore the friendly relations which for. merly existed, my hope of success rests' nfoiuly (under Divine Providence) on the co-operation fthd support which I may receive from the Colonists, #hd the resources you na^r place at my disposal. It is #n arduous task only to be effected by eta-nest end persevering exertion made in tho spirit tfhich becomes a greet snd civilized nation in its dealings --{Mth ft people bufc . partially reclaimed from barbarism, and tery imperfectly enlightened. At the same time I am not unmindful of what is due to the European population which relying on well known treaties and guarantees has made this country its adopted home, ftnd is entitled to expect that the progress of colonization shall not be unnecessarily or improperly obstructed. 4. Document* will be laid before you which will show you the character of some of the Institutions by which I nope to confirm the attachment to the Government of those Native tribes which have hitherto continued friendly, to restore the confidence of those 'which have unhappily been alienated, and gradually to elevate the race to a higher level of civilization. Some progress, necessarily limited by circumstances, and by the extent of the resources at my disposal, has already been made in the introduction of those institutions. How far this has been done, and what success has hitherto attended it, you will learn from the Reports of the Civil Commissioners ©nd Resident Magistrates, who have been engaged in the worfe, and which will ba laid before you.

5. In framing the Institutions referred to, you will observe that I have endeavoured to avail myself, as far as possible, of the machinery provided by certain Acts passed by you iv your Session of 1858, end other existing laws of the Colony. It is desirable, however, tnat the powers conferred by those Acts should be in some respects enlarged, and Bills will be laid before you for that purpose. I have found also, that great impediments exist in the way of enabling the Natives to de*l with their Lands; and particularly in the administration of Native Beserves, the individiuklisation of Native title ond the issue of Crown Grants to Natives. Bills will be laid before you which have for their object the removal of the impediments referred to, and the amendment, in several particulars, of the existing law on „hose subject*,

6. I have hitherto had no occasion, and hopa that I shall have none to employ the Military forces in any active field operations. Shortly after my arrival in this Colony however, 1 became aware that the Southern frontier of the settled portion of the Province of Auckland waa entirely unprovided with a line of defence against the quarter from which, in case of further insurrection, an attack was most likely to be made, and that the absence of roads would render it impossible to move Troops further inland than 15 or 20 miles from the Town of Auckland, so that insurgents might have approached within that distance of the Seat of Government, and the population of a large part of the Province been involved in destruction and ruin. I therefore, lo3t no time in requesting the . Officer commanding Her Majesty's Forces to employ a portion of tho Troops under his command in completing, to the banks of the Waikato River, the great Southern Trunk Road. , That Officer responded to ms. ropiest with the greatest promptitude; The works were commenced in January and a metalled rosd is all but completed to the banks of the Waikato, where a Military Post is established commanding that River, and presenting a barrier to any hostile attempt against Auckland from that quarter. I gladly avail myself ofVthiS-. opportunity of expressing my thanks to the officers aud men wlio have been so employed, and who have continued their operations to a far ad. vanced period ofan unusually severe and rainy sea- - son. At Taranaki works of. a similar olass have been commenced by the Militia, and I hope shortly to 1 undertake operations of the same character in other districts. These works, while greatly contributing to the security of the settlements, will - largely and permanently benefit them is either respects. Their construction will necessarily involve a considerable outlay,, and a Bill will be laid before the House of Representatives, by which it will be proposed to authorise tho Government to raise a Loan not exceeding £100,000 for the purpose of meeting the necessary outlay. It is proposed to charge this Loan on the Northern Island, and ultimately to allocate it proportionally to the several Provinces in which ifc may be expended. 7. Her Majesty's Government has repeatedly expresed its anxious desire to learn that the Colony has taken effective. steps towards local self-defence by the creation of a militia force. It is extremely desirable that greater preparations should be mada in that particular. To enable this to ber done, ft Bill will be laid before you for the better organisation of Militia and Volunteer forces, and it is hoped that the encouragement which ifc is proposed to give to the latter may result iii the increased. Btrength and efficiency of such corps. I cannot conclude this subject without expressing my thanks to the Auckland Volunteer' Corps which lately took the garrison duty of that Province, thus enabling a considerably larger number off troops to be employed in the construction of -the' Military Road than could have otherwise been detached for that duty. 8. The rapid growth of the settlements in the Middle Isjand, and the sudden developement of their resources, arising in a great degree from

the discovery of gold and other mineral wealth, will probably have suggested to y.m the expedi- , ency of making some further pvovkion for the administration of the General Govern ment in that Island. I trust also that tiie arrangements which have lately been made for the increase of the Steam Postal Service between the Northern and Middle Islands, will be found greatly to lessen the inconvenience which has hitherto, no doubt, existed. , The late unfortunate loss of tlie White Swan will, 1 trust, not involve more than a very temporary and partial derangement to this service I caunot, however allude to that event without expressing the gratitude which is due to Almignty God for the preservation of so many valuable lives as were in peril on that occasion ; and »lso the deep sense which is entertained by my Government of the very great kindness and hospitality which were exercised towards the ship - wrecked persons by Mr. John Moore, tlie Resident proprietor of the station near to which the wreck occurred. Gentlemen of the House of Representatives, — 9. The Estimates for the financial year will be laid before you without delay. They have been framed in the same spirit of economy es I trust you will find has directed the expenditure of the funds plaoed at the disposal of the Government by your last Appropriation Act. It is my duty to call your attention to the correspondence which has taken place between Her Majesty's Government and the Colonial Government, relative to the cost of the Military operations which have taken piece since the outbreak at Taranaki ; and I have to request that you will enable me to state to Her Majesty's Government what proportion of the cost the Colony will be prepared to take upon itself. Honourable Gentlemen of the Legislative Council, and Gentlemr.v of the House of Representatives, — 10. The Census which was taken on ' the 1 6th day of December, in the year 1861, is in the course of compilation, and will very shortly be published. In the meantime a full abstract of ell the most important returns will belaid before you. A comparison of this Census with that oi 1858 will be found to* exhibit a most splisf&ctory result. 11. ln conclusion I ernrnestly hope that the Supreme Ruler of the World, who controls ©nd directs all human events, may so, inspire your counsels with wisdom, and so support me in the execution of my duty, that our joint efforts to secure the peace and advancement of this country m«y be crowned with euccots. The house was then cleared of all but the members, when the Speaker read a letter authorising him to ftdniinister the oath of allegiance. The swearing in of the members was then proceeded with. Some correspondence was then read empowering the Governor Sir George Grey to increase the -Legislative Council. Mr. Sewell then laid on the table the following papers — Papers relative to Stefiim Posted Service. Sir George Grey's native pl*n of Government. Mr. Buller '* further report of the Kaipoi District. Report of the otate of the natives. Sir George G-rey'9 commission. Third report on the postal service of New Zealand 1861 and 1862, hy the Postmaster-General. Despatch tn&nsmitting the Imperial statute amending the Passenger Act 1 855. Further papers relative to Desertion from ships of war. Report, of the Board of Enquiry. Abstract and Summary Tables of results of the Census of New Zealand. Native affairs, despatches from th© Secretary of state and the Governors of JNew Zealand. Native address of welcome to Sir G. Grey. Native Schools, report of Inspectors. Mr. Buller's final report on the partition and individualization of the Kaipoi District. Miscellaneous reports respecting the Maori • Runangft, Cattle Trespass, &c, &c. Report of the state of the Natives in various district*. Index to the Statute Law of New Zealand. Further papers relative to disallowance of Provincial Bills. Papers relative to the Land Registry Act. Papers relative to Acts of the General Assembly. Papers relative to the organization of the Militia. Further papers relative to Militia and Naval allowances. Papers relative to increasing the number of Members of the Legislative Council. Tabular Schedule of the Acts and Ordinances of the Provincial Councils of New Zealand. Petition to Her Majesty from the Provincial Council of Auckland, pi#ying i'or a separate Government for the Province. _ Papers relative to the appointment of Judges of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, Statement shewing the sales effected of the loan of £l; o,o©o. Report of the Board of Enquiry as to the expediency of establishing a Government Printing Office. Return of the number of acres of Waste Land sold or otherwise disposed of in the various Provinces — 1861. On the motion of Mr. Sewell the house adjourned till Wednesday. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. MONDAY, JOLY 1-TH, 1862. The members of this house met to-day at noon and aftev the usual form of prayer, the Speaker read a letter from the Colonial Secretary's Office, stating that the Governor Sir George Grey would address the members of the General Assembly this day at 2 o'clock. Mr. Fox then moved that this house stand adjourned till _ to 2, the motion being put and carried, the house then adjourned accordingly. At two o'clock the House having again assem - bled, were summoned to attend his Excellency in the Legislative Council Chamber. new members. After their return the Speaker read a letter from the Colonial Secretary's Office enclosing a list of newly elected members. The oath was then administered by the Speaker to Thomas Bannatyne Gillies, Esq., member for Bruce, Otago; James Williamson, Esq., for the City of Auckland, West; Isaac Newton Watt, Esq., for New Plymouth ; W 8. Moorhouse for Heathcote, Canterbury ; J. E. Fitzgerald, Esq.' for.Ellesmere, Canterbury; and Major Richardson' for Dure lin. , NAT ÜBALIZ ATION BILL. On the motion of Mr. Fox, the Naturalization Bill was read a first time, and Mr, Fox gave notice that he would move the second reading next Sitting day . HIS EXCELLENCES SPEECH. The Speaker read to the House a copy of His Excellency' Speech. Mr. Fox moved that it be printed.— Agreed to Mr. Fitzhebbebt gave notice that on w ednes^ day, 16th inst., he would move an Address in rel ply to His Excellency's Sf each. NOTICES OF MOTION. Mr. C. Wabd : To move for leave to bring in a Bill to facilitate the preparation and issue of Crown .Grants, and also, | A Bill to confer additional powers on the Commissioners' of Crown Lands. Col. Nixon to move for Returns showing the strength of and other particulars relating to tbe different Volunteer corps in the colony. Mr. Gillies -. To ask Ministers whether it is their intention to propose an increase of Iftepresen tatives to Otago, or and re-distribution of Representation ; and also* whether it is their intention to propose any amendment of the Miner's Franchise Act, 1800.

Mr. Fox : To move an Address of Condolence to ti' j r Majesty ou the subject of the death of the late Prince Consort.

Seve.al notices of motion were also given for the appointment of th" usual Standing Committees. MESSAGE from his excellency. Message No. I was received from the Governor, enclosing copy of his Commission and Royal Instructions accompanying it. Ordered to be printed. PAPERS. Mr. Fox formally laid upon the table the papers he had previously laid before the House in an informal manner. Mr. Wood and j\lr. Ward did the same. Ordered to be printed. MANUK.AU HARBOUR. Mr. John Williamson wished to ask the Government, without notice, in order that the information might go away with the mail, whether ifc was their intention to make any provision during the present section, for buoying the south channel of Manukau Harbour. Mr. Wood replied that it was the intention of the. Government to place a sum of money on the Estimates for that purpose. COLONIAL OFFICE DESPATCHES. Mr. Stafford inquired vvhen the House might expect to have the despatches by the April mail, from the Colonial Office, before them. It would bo satisfactory to the House to know if any despatch had been received on the question of the rel»tion between the Governor and Ministers on native matters. Mr. Fox replied, that he was not aware of any despatch of any importance but what had been laid on the table, or would be in a few days, some fe«? documents being not yet before the House in consequence of the unfortunate loss of the White Swan ; but on the subject to which the hon. member alluded he did nob think any important despatch hed been received. On the motion of Mr. Fox, the House then adI journed till Wednesday, at the usual hour (5 p.m.)

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Bibliographic details

GENERAL ASSEMBLY., Wellington Independent, Volume XVII, Issue 1740, 15 July 1862

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2,750

GENERAL ASSEMBLY. Wellington Independent, Volume XVII, Issue 1740, 15 July 1862

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