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MISCELLANEOUS.

Visit op the Grand Dcj'ke Constant-ink to. E.noi.axo.—His Imperial Highness the Grind Dt'tko Constiintine, Lord- High' Admiral of the Russian Navy, arrived, on May 30, at Oshpine, on a Visit to Her Majesty. The Grand Duke left Cherbourg at daybreak, in the royal yacht Osborne, Oo:mnunder Bower, with the Russian imperial flag at the main. .The run across the Channel was favourable, and the yacht made the western portion of the Isle of Wight; she proceeded through the Needles, ar.d off Cowes the imperial visitor was saluted by the American frigate Susquehnna, which arrived in the roads two or three days since from the Meditterranean, in order to lake part with the Niayaa in laying down the Atlantic cable. The royal yacht continued her course to Osborne, wheie a salute was fired by the Eurydiee 2(>, Captain Tarlelon. The approach of the yacht had been telegraphed from Hurst Castle, and by the time she had arrived off Osborne, Prince Albert, with the Duke of Cambridge, and Count Chreptowitch, the Russian Ambassador, were iv readiness to receive the Grand Duke. Prince Albert went on board and welcomed his Imperial Highness on his visit. The Grand Duke then landed. A detachment of the 93rd Regiment of Highlanders, which gave the famous repulse to the charge of Russian cavalry at Balaklava, was drawn out as a guard of honour, the band of the regiment playing a Russian air. The Duke thou proceeded to Osborne on a visit to Her Majesty. Alter dining with the Queen, his Imperial Highness and suite returned to Osborne to sleep. On Sunday afternoon, Prince Albert, the Grand Duke, and the Duke of Cambridge went out for a short cruise beyond the Nab Light in the Victoria and Albert yacht. In the evening after dining with Her Majesty, his Imperial Highness slept on board the Osborne. At ten minutes lo lire on Monday morning, the Osborne weighed and left, under a salute of twenty-one guns from the Royal Yacht Squadron at Cowes. As she approached Spithead, with the Grand Duke's standard at the main, the Exmouth, 90 gun-ship, led off a general royal salute from the squadron at Spithead, all with mast-heads dressed. This, being at the early hour of twenty minutes past five on a brilliant summer's morning, naturally awoke the inhabitants of either shore, and many rushed to the beach, imagining, perhaps, the " Glorious First of June," was fighting its battle o'er again. The cannonade was very imposing, and the flag-ship Victory in the harbour also took part. By a quarter to six the Osborne was out of sight from Portsmouth, and steaming away at full speed for Calais. Mom* Defalcation's—A good deal of excitement has been caused recently in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and elsewhere, by the report that Mr. Henry Salmon, the agent for the Commercial Bank of Scotland, at Falkirk, bad absconded, after having made free to a large extent with the coffers of the bank. That such is the case is now not any longer matter of doubt, and it is understood that Mr. Salmon's defalcations extend to at least £30,000. The Commercial Bank, like all other Scotch banking establishments, has a regular system of inspection of the most searching kind : but it would appear that Mr. Salmon had made free with the funds in a way which sot ordinary detection at deli ance. When certain deposits were lodged, he granted a receipt in the mime of the bank in the ordinary way, but applied the funds to his own use ; and, as the transaction did not appear iv thebooksof'thebankdetectionby theordinarv checkswasimpossible. He must, however, have retained n private memorandum of these deposit reeeiptssoas to arrange for the payment of the interest upon them as it became regularly duo. Up till this exposure Mr. Salmon was a man of high consideration in the district, took a prominent part in every public movement, and lived sumptuously. He was the oldest official connected with the Commercial Bank, having been connected with the establishment for the lung period ol 40 years. This event is likely to lead to a keen scrutiny into the condition of the Scottish banks generally, which in the spirit of competition have been planted far too thickly. [The discovery of the defalcations was made by a clerk at the head-oflice, while Mr Salmon was absent at Stirling, sitting ou the bench as a magistrate. Upon the occurrence being made known Mr. Salmon fled from Falkirk, and made his way to the Harp-inn, Conway, North Wales, where he committed suicide by baiiginghimself.] Dr. Livingston*. —The freedom of the city of London was presented to the Key. Dr. Livingston, the celebrated African traveller, inclosed in a highly ornamented casket, value 50 guineas, agreeably to a recent resolution of the Court of Common Council. The casket is made of African rock, with silver plates, inscribed at the sides, and on the lo.i, in gold, Europe holding- the hand of friendship to Africa beneath the shade of a palm tree. The Court, which was presided over by the Lord Mayor, was crowded to excess, and among those present were numerous ladies, fashionably attired, to whom members of the court had surrendered their seats. The rev. gentlemen having taken the usual oaths, was addressed by Sir. J. Key, the chamberlain, in a highly eulogistic speech, and was then presented with the casket. Dr. Livingston in return for the honor made a practical common-place speech. Speaking of commercial relations with Africa, he said :— " I believe that in the country which I have had the honor to open to European commerce, there are many useful articles which have vet to !se known to us, and our feeling of dependence upon which will lead us to do our duty in puisuing the intercourse. (Hear, hear.) I brought some of these articles with me, and there is one, a fibrous tissue, which I have the opinion of one of the most mercantile firms iin the city, that when prepared it would be worth £'>0 or iio'O a ton. (Hear, hear.) It is quite unknown in Europe, and will be a most excellent flax. He added, I found upwards of a dozen fruits entirely unknown in England, and although I could not always be a good judge of what they were exactly, because I was sometimes very hungry when I got them—(lauglitori ; I know they were much better than the cnibapples of England—from which our other apples have come, and our sloes, from which we have got out plums ; and if cultivated we should I have no doubt have a very acceptable addition to our fruits. (Hear, hear). When I went into a village and the natives asked questions about me, the answer used often to be, " Why, he comes out of the sea, don't you sec his hair is straight." (Laughter.) I hope God will spare my life to go there again (hear, hear); and if the natives know that this country is anxious to employ their services to produce such things, and that they can exchange them with gicat advantage to themselves, 1 hope that Africa will be opened to the Gospel, and 1 hope that il will be opened to commerce, aud received into the polity of nations.

I TnE Most S'j'urnNnoos Bridoe in the 'World.— The-\Times Correspondent in America gives the 'following description of iv gigantic bridge at present in course of ereotioii,.acro;ss . the mighty St Lawrence:—" The ' greatest work (he says) : on thedii|e;.''and so;singularly, free of engineering,- difficulties, will be the Victoria' bridge, by'which the road is to cross the, St. Lawrence at Montreal. " It will more than l'iyal the Britnnqiabi'idge.at homo, for,coiisti'ticted on the same principle, it:will be' within 50 yards of two English miles' in length: A large fraction or the whole cost of the line will be expended on this work, for which the original estimate is £1,250,000. It was commenced in 1844, and by contracts ought to be completed in 1860. The abutment of the bridge on the Montreal bank is nearly finished, It is an immense structure, of almost Egyptian mnssiveness and solidity, the side that faces up the St. Lawrence slopes gradually like a breakwater, to receive and resist the drifts of ice that float down the river every spring, sometimes mounting above the quays, and crushing the houses upon them. Enormous strength is required in any fabric ihat has to stand up against the pressure of such masses, and certainly this abutment looks as if it could resist an earthquake. The iron superstructure will bo carried across the river from the two abutments on 24 piers, of which nine are finished, standing like islands iv the stream ; 'no part of the roadway has been constructed. The centre span of the iron tube will be 350 feet; the spaces between the other piers, 12 on each side of the centre, will be 242 each. Considerable discussion has been excited by the plan adopted, some malcontents objecting to the expense, aud asserting that acheaper mode of construction might hare been employed. This is probably the effect of the successful application of the suspension principle in the bridge across the Niagara, by which at a very moderate cost, railroad traffic has been carried across a chasm 800 feet wide, more than double the larges span of the Victoria Bridge. There has been ti controversy on the subject; but, on the authority of very eminent engineers, the plan which bridged the chasm of Niagara could not be applied to a river with low banks and having a breadth of about two miles." Atlantic Telegraph.-—On May 16th, the United States steam-ship, the Niagara, arrived in the river Thames, and anchored just below Gravesend, on the 18th, her Majesty's ship, Aytnnemnon, 91 guns, arrived from Portsmouth and took up her moorings there, to ship the submarine telegraph to be laid down in the Atlantic Ocean to connect the continents of America and Europe. The length of cable to be put ou board each vessel exceeds 1300 miles ; it will take upwards of six weeks to deposit the cable in the ships' holds. According to present arrangements, her Majesty's ship Agamemnon and the United' States frigate Niagara will leave the Thames about the first week in July, in. company with her Majesty's ship Cyclops, and will proceed to the latitude midway between the west coast of Ireland and Newfoundland. Heie the ends of the cable on board each ship will be joined, the Agamemnon will then return towards the coast of Ireland and the Niagara will hold on her course to the shores of Newfoundland, both ships paying out the submarine cable as they increase the distance between them, and maintaining constant telegraphic communication with each other, lo prove that that the cable remains intact; and within six days after the ships separate, should no accident occur, telegraphic communication will be open between the two continents. The portion of the Atlantic submarine cable waiting for shipment at the the works of Messrs. Glass, _ Elliott, and Co., at East Greenwich, where it was manufactured, narrowly escaped destruction recently, through the outbreak of a fire in one of the bending sheds connected with ; the factory. It was occasioned by a boy dropping a piece of lighted yarn into the place" where he had gone to look after some lost article. The cable, which was in the docks, was not touched, though for some time it was in danger. - A novel and amusing scheme has been propounded for exploring the vast unknown interior of Australia. Mr. Charles Green, son of the veteran aeronaut of that name, proposes, in conjunction with J J 0. Taylor, who has invented a screw-propeller, to explore the interior of Australia by means of the famous Nassau balloon.

The "DEnm* Day of May 27, 1857. London's only Carnival, " the Derby," came off on the above day on a grand scale of magnitude and success. Everything was favourable, even the weather was as brilliant as if no public holiday was meant, und the whole day will bear comparison with the most auspicious that ever assembled the metropolis upon the Downs of Epsom. For one day, boih by right and fashion, is London privileged to 'take leave. of its senses and abandon itself withaut reserve to the dusty pleasures of the Derby For 24 hours trade and business are as things of no account. The "odds"and turf "shave" succeed invoices and bank accounts, and all give themselves up to the enjoyment of the great holiday with a relish and excitement that inspires the most blase, and rouses the most phlegmatic. It is very well to say that it is our national taste for horse-racing which blackens the Downs on these occasions, but we have our doubts of the correctness of the assertion. What would the race be without the road to it, the people, the little pleasure parties, and the not little hampers? The Derby day is, in fact, the metropolitan pic nic. It is looked forward to as such, and the dust, hurry, confusion, tepid champagne, and gritty fowls, arc so many necessary adjuncts to the great day out. Take away any of these accessaries, and the Derby day would be as tedious as a debate on Maynooth. As the horses were led towards the Grand Stand they passed proudly along, pawing the ground, and looking as if they knew that the eyes of a hundred thousand people were upon them. Every one crowded around Tournament, admiring his fine shape, his silky hide, his fiery eye, and his gallant action. His winning became almost a certainty, and his backers were in ecstacies. Skirmisher, also—" Scrummager" as he was fondly called by his humbler partisans—had a strong paity; but nobody asked which was "Blink Bonny," or "Black Tommy." They were dark horses, and nobody dreamt that a dark horso was to win the race. There was a little race which nobody seemed to care about; then the letting out of the cn-wd for an hour or so ; and, finally, an awful pause, much aggravated and protracted by the numerous false starts made by the horse's. Not lcs3 than a dozen times did eager watchers shout " they're off," and a dozen times was the vast crowd disappointed. Even the veteian who rang the b. 11 was betrayed iuto a premature ding-dong so that at last when the whole ruck was fairly on the course the spectators on the Grand Stand would not believe the fact until they saw the horses rush madly round the corner. The race was the affair of but a moment—of a sudden was heard, a hoarse murmur, gradually swelling into an uproar—a confused dull trampling, and a rush like a whirlwind, as the horses swept by—the colours mixed, changed, and vanishing in the distance ; and ere you could

collect a thought or hazard a guess the D~i" was run and won. Tho following !U . ( , ,1,, ,'' I'tails of the race:— ■;' fx; v- ■%- , Ult (1 <-- ,'The Di-iinvrSTAKusoftSO soys. each 1. ~ •filr v ' 3 yr. 61.1s ; c.lt's, Hst' 7lbs.;' fillies, Rst'oi ' The second to receive 100 soys. mil o i'ti '" the winner- to '-pay.lOO.sovs ~t' wards the police and regulations of \\!~' course, ami 50 soys, to the judge. Mile ~ • a half. _To he run on the New course. _v" ■■': .subscribers..:, -..-.,.-.-.. ~ Mr. ,W. I'Ausonls Blink Bonny, by Mcl- : "'""'" bouiuc, Bsl. 31 bs. (Charlton) \ Mr. Drinktild's Black Tommy, Bstj 71b;i • ■ ■ - (Covey) ' " 0 Mr. Mellish's Adamas, B*l 71b. (Wells) 3 Mr. C. Harrison's Strathnaver, Bst, (lib. (Bumby) ■ ' 4 The following also ran-.— Skirmisher 71,1 Hawthorn, Oakball, Wardermasko, '_,2 Zee, Anton, M. D., Saunlcrcr, Tournament" Sydney, Turbit, Laertes, Beeswax, Luvolt' Newton-le-Willows, Commutioii, Lamlimu-Y Special License, Ackworth, Sprig of .Sliillolu,r|,' Glee Singer, Arsenal, Chevalier ilTiidusVrV Birdiii-the-ilaiul, Gubcrlunzie, and line, ' Miller. •' Tim Race.—-At the start Chevalier dTmltistric took the command, with Gabcrhuizic Com" motion, Oakball, Turbit, Ai'ilou, Arseinl Strathnaver, Blink Bonny, WardevinarsvV Adamas, and Lady Hawthoru forming a cluste' in his wake, Suuu'terer, Skirmisher, 'Pounuinient and M. D. being in the centre of tlie rue]They ran thus to half-way up the lull; when: Gaberlttnaio went up to the Chevalier, and wasoon in possession of a clear lead,'the Chevalier lying second, Anton third, .Strailhnavcr, Arsenal and Commotion heading the next lot. No further change occur) cd until reaching the mile post, when Anton rushed to the front, L;i W . bourn running into the second place, Chevalier dTndiistrie going on third, Strathnaver and Arsenal next On rounding Tuttenham corner M. D. emerged from the ruck and showed in' the third place, Lamiiourn at the same time joining Anton, with whom lie ran nearly head and head round the turn, Adamas, Tournament Strathnaver, and Skirmisher keeping close com I pany, and Lady Hawthorn, who had up to this point ran 'with the leading horses, gradually dropping away into the rc.ir. When they fairly landed in the straight, Commotion disappeared from the front,' and Black Tommy Adamas, Arsenal, M. D , Wardcrmarske, Blink Bonny, and Strathnaver showed nearly in a line behind Lambourn and Anton. On crossinn- the road Lambourn gave way, and at the distance M. D. broke down and stopped "as if he was shot." On nearing the stand Strathnaver headed Anton, with Blink Bonny waiting upon them Adamas, Arsenal, and Black Tomiiiv going UII iv close attendance. In ;i few strides further a most exciting set-to ensued, and Charlton " let out" Blink Bonny, who immediately rushed to the front, Black Tommy, Adamas, Arsenal, and Anton, being well up in her wake, a close race in favour of Blink Bonny by a neck, the second beating the third by a head only, aud a neck separating the third from the fourth; Anton and Arsenal were fifth and sixth close together, so well up, indeed, that theriderof each thought he was either second or third. Wardcrmarske, Lambourn, Commotion, Znyder Zee, Skirmisher, Saunterer, Beeswax Coit, Tournament, and Sydney formed the next lot, but we were unshle to determine their relative positions! The " tail" consisted of Laertes, Bird-in-the-hand, Turbit, Guberlunzie, Special License, Dusty Miller and Loyola. , The lesult of the race was scarcely unexpected ; for Blink Bonny, the winner, had throughout the winter been the leading favourite, and had only lost her position in the betting by her .defeat at Newmarket for the One Thousand Guineas Stakes—a defeat which is now inexplicable, and which, perhaps, can only be attributed to the glorious uncertainty of the turf. After her performance at Newmarket she went quite out of the betting, but a few days ago she was again brought into favour, and at starting was in much request at 20 to 1. Still many people believed that Strathnaver, her stable companion, and winner of the Deo Stakes at Chester, would be the more trusted of the two. The ring is somewhat severely hit by the success of Blink Bonny ; for many who had backed her prior to her Newmarket running had no opportunity of hedging, and were compelled to stand their money out, while others, believing she had no chance, betted heavily against her without a thought of saving any part of their investments. Had Black Tommy won, the fielders would have had a rare turn; for this horse, except by his owner, who stood to win £27,000 on him, was not backed for sixpence.

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MISCELLANEOUS., Wellington Independent, Issue 1226, 12 September 1857, Supplement

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MISCELLANEOUS. Wellington Independent, Issue 1226, 12 September 1857, Supplement

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