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ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

To the Editor oj the Wellington Independent.

Sib, —The wreck of the Maria, of London, 'Captain Plank, about 0' o'clock a.m., on tho 23rd instant, on a rock known as Qnthank's, off Terawitte, within a few miles of this port, and the loss of her crew and passengers, to the number of twenty-nine persons, only one apprentice and a Malay seaman having been saved, is a fearful catastrophe, and calls forth the sympathy of the etitire community; but are the Government and Inhabitants wholly blameless in this affair? Here is a fine vessel, ably commanded by aii experienced seaman, and one that had acquired some knowledge of the coast, wrecked at our very doors, and for an obvious reason, the want of a Light-house either on Pencarrow Head, or the Brothers. As a seaman, I fearlessly state, and do maintain, that the lives of Captain Plank, his crew, and passengers, have been sacrificed through the apathy of those whose duty it was to have caused Light-houses to have been erected.

Sicuc the formation of settlements in Cook's Straits, many wrecks have occurred in that vicinity, and numerous public meetings have beeu held here, and the Government petitioned on the subject of erecting a Lighthouse. On the 12th December, 1811, during a south-east gale, three vessels were standing in for Port Nicholson, the Elbe, American whaler, with a full cargo of oil, became a total wreck in Palliser Bay. The Winwick, with a full cargo of oil from the coast, was wrecked in Lyall's Bay. The Middlesex rau on Barrett's Reef, aud escaped with considerable damage. Several lives were lost on this eventful occasion, and strenuous efforts made to induce the Government to erect a a Lighthouse, and the merchants and others offered to subscribe liberally in aid of tho desired object, but without effect.

It is the duty of the Colonists to make another effort to induce the Government to erect a Lighthouse iv Cook's Straits oa the Brothers, or some other advantageous position, and a Harbour Light on Pencarrow Head. As it has now become of national importance, that Cook's Straits should be lighted, it being the direct route from the Australian Colouies to Europe, aud the west coast of America.

A public meeting of the inhabitants should he immediately called to petition the Colonial and Imperial Government on the subject. 1 am, Your obedient servant, W. B. EIIODES. ■ Wellington, July 25,1851.

To the Editor of the Wellington Independent,

Sin, —The recent catastrophe at Terrawitte, viz., the wreck of,the Maria, by which so many lives have been lost, gives the merchants and shipowners of-Wellington .an opportunity of calling upon Sir George Grey, to devote some small portion of the revenue collected from themrelves, to the erection of a Lighthouse, instead of squandering it away amongst a host of unnecessary officials. I have attended the meeting of the Legislative Council.for a short time during the last few days, while the estimate's for 1851, wore being passed, and 1 regret that I did not hear of any sum being set apart for useful purposes, nothing but salaries, it is really too bad to see so many thousands of pounds appropriated, Without oilr having the slightest coutroul over the same. I, being one deeply interested in the sudcess of the Foreign and Coasting trade of New Zealand, am willing to subscribe £-10 towards the erection of a Lighthouse, and I have no doubt but every merchant in Wellington will not only follow my example, but subscribe more liberally. '

My advice is, be true to each other-and if the Wal Government have appropriated the revenue of IW.Jl—subscribe sullicicnt amongst yourselves, and erect a Lighthouse— yo« will reap the benefit lam, Sir,

Your obcdenl servant, One ov tub Welmnciton MisnciiASTs P.S.—I enclose my name that, if anything is ?, 0,10 ,.i„ IhJ,l1 h J,I ! m P° rU,lt milUe '-. y°°- >"ay bo assured the £30 will be paid on demand.

To the Editor of the Independent. Ilalf-Way House, Porirua Road, Mn. Editob,—What is to be done about our neighbour Mr. Whitehouse—He has been lying opposite the Half-way House, now six months, with a broken leg, and it was only a fortnight ago ibat the Rev. Mr. Cole sent Dr. Dorset to give his opinion. Dr. Dorset/on seeing him, declared that tho man must die soon, unless he was removed to town, and Something done for him. WitU a one handed kindness, Mr. Cole sent a vehicle two days fur him, hut when the man understood that he was to go to the Hospital, he positively declined, preferring to die where he was at home.

Now, Mr/Editor, can you tell me what ia to be done? Must the man lay and die there because no other than the Colonial Surgeon is allowed to attend a patient in the Hospital?—for that I understand is the ground of his refusal. Could he have had-Dr. Dorset, he would willingly have gone in.

Could you not by an appeal to the charitable raise funds enough to provide him a lodging and attendance in town,;without going toHospital.

.A Pobiuua-Road Settleb. P.S.—I refer you>o Mr. Cole;or Dr. Dorset for the truth of this statement.

To the Editor of the Wellington Independent. | Sin, —In your leading article of Wednesday last, mention is made of the Road and Street Ordinance coming in force. Although, Mr. Editor, •no one in I the colony is a warmer advocate for good roads than I ahi, and I am fully aware of the advantages that would accrue to the colony from having them, for the work would be done much quicker, aud with a great saving of horse flesh and vehicles; but altho' I am a carter, and-depend on the same for my living, I would rather make any shift and put up with things as they are, than that the public at large should be vexatiously deceived, as I know well such would be the case. In speaking of the Hutt Road, as on that my experience lies, 1 am sure that the money already expended ought to have made it : fit to drive a coach and four upon; at present the timber drays cannot get along without discharging part of! their loads, and one month more will very near extinguish the trade between the Hutt and Wellington altogether. Let the colonists cast a look back,' and examine the causes of this bad road in particular, aud I am sure they not will be surprised that so much money should do so little work: iv the first place I have seen, and could take oath to the fact, four directors, foremen, gangers, or whatever other name they go by, whose wages at least in total amouut to a guinea a day, superintending 3 natives and 1 white man—3 > natives at 2s. Od. aud 1 white man at 4s.—lis. 6d., so that you pay a guinea to direct lis. Od. Again, the men on the roads here only work 5 honrs, in England 10 hours per day, so that literally speaking a man costs the Government Bs. for a day's work, and no responsibility whatever. It matters not who he may be, whether sailor, soldier, music master, clown, or pantaloon, if be bolongs to the right country, lie is put down with the pensioners on the roads: the Government would : find plenty of men if advertised for, who would make ' a good and passable road for about one-tenth of the j money it cost Government, and bring into competition good and experienced bauds iv road making, and some who have worked under the best Engineers of the day. lam sure no carter would grumble in paying a turnpike, provided he had a good road for his money. But supposing such were to be the case, and each cart charged ss. a day—give this to Government, and it would not keep a mile of the road in good repair. The people of Wellington say, I can't see how the Hutt Road can be so bad, when there is at least (1 men working oa it daily : tkese men would do, rightly directed—but who is to direct, and who does, I should like to know—they do, as all' men do, so situated. No metal worth speaking of has been put on the road this winter, and even that, contrary to all experience: metal of the worst kind that couldbe got from the hill, and that a hardened clay, while within a cast of the shovel lay thousauds of tons of as good metal as ever need be used. Last winter I recollect seeing the contractor working in a hard rain, and the remark he made was, that he must work almost night and day, for the metal.wore out as fast as his men could put it on, and had we had severe weather this winter, neither cart or dray would have been able to get to town long before this. It would take £200 to place the road, with all the good weather we have luid, in as good condition as this time last year. The road is getting in a most dangerous state through neglect, even more thau it might seem at a glance ; the wheels are dividing the road into three separate portions, and in a very short time that portion nearest the sea will in a great many places be separated entirely from the other portions, and then the difficulties will commence. About 20 or 30 men with tools fit to work with, would soon repair it, for you must remember there is a good deal in the tools, for with such shovels as the men have at present I defy any man to say he can do justice; they might answer for taking the ashes from the hearth, and the wheel-barrows to wheel it away. They ought, without delays to be sent-to the British Museum to preserve their species. I must, Sir, conclude with this remark, no. Taxation without Representation, and lhe liberty to read over the items and see that they are right, of every Bill before you settle the same. To be continued. July 18,1851. Hutt : €abter. '•■

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Bibliographic details

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE., Wellington Independent, Volume VII, Issue 604, 26 July 1851

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1,694

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. Wellington Independent, Volume VII, Issue 604, 26 July 1851

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