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THE TWO GREAT EVENTS.

doncaster meeting. Thursday, September 17, 1850,

The: St. Leger Stakes of 50 soys. each, h. ft., for three-year-old : colts, Bst 7lb; fillies, Bst 2tb. The owner of the second horse to receive 300 soys. out of the stakes, and the third 100 soys. The winner to pay 400 soys. towards expenses, and 25 soys. lo the judge. St. Leger Course. 95 subs. Lord Zetland's Voltigeur, byVoltaire..J. Marson 0 1 Mr. Murphy's Ittissborongh, by '..caraway.... 0 2 Mr. W. Edward's Bolingbroke 3 Captain Archtliill's Windischgratz Lord Enfield's The iJechumcr Mr. Henry's Pitsford Mr. Melklnm's The Italian Mr. Watts' Chatterbox _ _ _ _ Betting at starting.—Six to four on Voltigeur—five to one against Pitsford— ten to one against Windischgratz— 12 lo one against Beehunter—twenty to one against Russborough— twenty to one against Chatterbox—twenty-five to one against Bolingbroke—forty to one against The Italian. The start and the race.—Voltigeur first showed in front of the stand, and all eyes were strained to catch a glimpse of him. The attention of the serried multitudes was, however, quickly drawn to Pitsford, Bolingbroke, Beehunter, The Italian, and Windischgratz, as they passed on in succession. These were soon followed by the Irish lot, and after the course had been sufficiently cleared—a task of no ordinary difficulty—they took their preparatory canter, proceeded to the post, and were duly marshalled by Mr. Hibburd with his usual efficiency.

The start was beautifully effected, Beehunter taking the lead, "Voltigeur and Russborough lying up, Windischgratz fourth. lujtheir rear Bolingbroke, The Italian, Chatterbox, and Pitsford, as we have given their names. After running about a hundred and fifty yards, Windischgratz took second place, and Russborough then became third, running in close company with Voltigeur, Pitsford still lying off. They breasted the hill in a cluster, and in streaming down to tbe mile post Pitsford went to work in earnest, and soou obtained possession of the second place, Voltigeur aud Bolino-- J

broke lying next, Russborough, Windisgratz, the Italian, and Chatterbox following in close order. Beehunter continued lo lead until they were within a quarter of a mile of home, when Pitsford went up to him, and they ran together for a short distance. By the turn into the straight -was made, the chances of both were quite extinguished. Voltigeur was then seen in front, with Bolingbroke at his girths; The Italian third, Russborough next. When opposite the stand Russborough, whilst coming up on the off side, ran against Bolingbroke and drove him across the Italian, who was thereby checked in his stride. Marson, apparently confident of success, looked round—Robinson was with him in the twinkling of an eye. The movement showed the perfection of riding. Russborough was at Voltigeur's shoulder; in the next effort he reached his neck; and amidst the acclamations of the swarming thousands, he iv the last stride got to Voltigeur's head, and the struggle ended in a dead heat! Bolingbroke beating the Italian by a neck; Beehunter fifth, Pitsford, Windischgratz, and Chatterbox bringing up the rear. Run in 3 mm. 21 seconds. Mildew, and Marlow " up," appeared amongst the starters ; but after taking a short canter up the course, ho was found to be lame, and was consequently withdrawn. After tho race an examination of Russborough's mouth was requested and permission immediately given, when the suspiciou which had been raised against him was very satisfactorily dispelled. Betting.—Deciding heat—six to four on Voltigeur. Russborough led until they were within a hundred yards of the chair, when Voltigeur went up and headed him. In vain did " Our Jem " ply all his skill; Voltigeur achieved the triumph cleverly by a length. Run in 3 mm. 24 sec. The cheering, waving of handkerchiefs and throw up of bats on the winner returning to the scale lasted for at least 10 minutes ; such a scene of excitement, we venture to affirm, has never been witnessed on this or any other race-course ; indeed, the St. Leger of 1850, the third in succession carried off by the -winner of the Derby, and the second for which a dead heat was ever run, may be fairly pronounced one of the most memorable on record. The concourse was so im mense that after tho dead heat it was impossible to keep the course clear, and in the succeeding races, from the mob closing in upon them, horses and riders were placed in imminent peril; that Marson and Robinson piloted their horses safely through the living avenue up the distance is a miracle.

Friday, the Cup,

The Done aster Cup, value 300 soys:, three yrs. old, 7st; four Bst 51b; five, Bs. I2lt>; six and aged, 9st 21b mares and geldings allowed 3fb. The winner in any of the Derby, St. Leger, the Emperor's Cup at Ascot, or the Goodwood Cup, to carry 7lb extra; the second for any of those 3lb extra. Cup Course.

Lord Zetland's Voltigeur, 3 yr, 7st 71- (including 71b extra) Flatman 1 Lord Eglinton's Tho Flying Dutchman, 4 yr, Bst 12it> (including 7H> extra) 2 Betting, 5 to 1 on The Flying Dutchman.

The favorite took a lead of three or four lengths, but after rounding to top turn, Voltiguer, pulling double, was pretty close up in his track. On going over the hill, howeve/, the favorite was again some lengths in advance, and in this way the race was run to the turn into the straight. Flatman than brought all his skill into full exercise, and having gradually gained ground, he reached the favorite's quarters as he neared the stand; the most exciting and interesting contest ensued. On they went—the favorite's weight told upon him; and amidst the tremendous shouts of the multitude, he was headed in the last two or three strides, and the victory was achieved by half a length. Run in 4mm 54 sec.

The races were brought to a close a few minutes after five o'clock, and then ensued a scene at the station of which no description can give an adequate idea; for hours was the place and hundreds were unable to get away until long after midnight; and many who did get into the wrong trains and travelled south instead of north, and not a few had to remain in Doncaster all night, half famished and bedless. As a proof of the unprecedented number present, we may mention that, although liberal provision had been made at the houses of entertainment in the town several were, to use a vulgar expression, " eat out of house and home" before the day was half over.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WI18510402.2.12

Bibliographic details

THE TWO GREAT EVENTS., Wellington Independent, Volume VI, Issue 571, 2 April 1851

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1,085

THE TWO GREAT EVENTS. Wellington Independent, Volume VI, Issue 571, 2 April 1851

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