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LATEST ENGLISH NEWS.

(Froni the S-. Australian Register, June 27 J

By the Midlothian from Plymouth, March 21, we are in possession of papers to that date.

The Queen and Prince Albert, werd well, having honored her Majesty's theatre with a visit on tlie 19th.

The latest quotation for Consols is that of the 19th, when they left off at 95£ for money, and 95# for the 1 lth April.

. In the House of Commons, on the 19th. March, there occurred the following dis-» cussion in reference to the AustratiatL Colonies Bill i— -

Mr. Gladstone said he wished to know from the noble lord, the first Minister of the Crown, whether her Majesty's Government were willing to make provision, in the Australian Colonies Government Bill for the application of the principle of local self-government to the affairs of the Church of England in these colonies, by declaring it shall be lawful for the bishops, clergy, and lay members of that church to establish. regulations oh the footing of the consent among themselves, arid subject to any restraints which might be thought necessary for the management of these affairs. Lord John Russeil said he was afraid he would not be able to have clauses which would carry into effect the object the right hon. gentleman had in view, without raising the question of giving power which might fee found inconvenient in the colonies. .'..-■■

A despatch, written in a very haughty and unusual tone, had been addressed by Count Nesselrode, the Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs, to Baron Brunow, and by him forwarded to Lord Palmerston. It chiefly refers to the affairs of Greece, and has been the subject of comment in the House of Lords.

A seaman of the mail-packet .Garlavd fell, into the sea nt Calais, and his body was not recovered for ten minutes. For> two hours the commander of the steamer, Lieutenant Wylde, the second master, and the engineer, took turns with the crew in applying the remedies recommended for the resuscitation of the apparently drowned, and their efforts were then crowned with success. ' The sailor, has since been brought/to-. Dover, and is going on well. The oanejiffjirdsaileßson not to relax ; endeavours 4o revive tlhci; drowned top soon. - '•* t . -,-.-'■; rf^y

'Eepresentative of the Crown, and would be liable— 'like all other measures of the Local Legislature— to be .disallowed by Her Majesty. An enactment therefore creating a permanent charge on the Revenue for expenditure regarding the Natives would -afford them all the security that could be desired. O.L) The provisions of Sec. 12 of ,tho Ordi- , aance appear to effect all that is necessary in the ■■wayof reserving subjects of general importance to rthe jurisdiction of the Central Legislative Council. There are however many other heads on which it /•should seem very expedieut that uniformity of legislation should be maintained in the Islands. Such •are for instance, Criminal Laws inflicting either the punishment of death, or secondary punishment r-of serious magnitude-rLaws regulating the course ••of inheritance'of real or personal property, or the mode of disposing of property by will, and the exiteut of power exercisable by a Testator—Laws prescribing rules for the naturalization of aliens—and, perhaps, Laws regulating the form aud effect of -fdeeds and other evidence of contracts.

(15.) And it is tq be observed that in points of .'this kind, convenience requires that the Law of the different Proviaces shorild not only be framed "With k maw to substantial similarity, but that it rsUould bo absolutely identical in language; "both a mere difference in Nvordiug will often Tβ--eult in important though unintentional differences -of substance; : and also iv order that decisions in of 'Lawrgiven in one Province may apply, 4>eyond possibility of doubt, to the Law as it stands ■in others.'<.

. (16.) These considerations, however, I leave to ;• your judgment, without wishing'to prescribe to you any particular manner of carrying them into execution. It may be that the power possessed by the •lieutenant-Governors of refusing their assent to -any law infringing this desirable (uniformity which 'might'be passed by the Legislatures of the Provinices would, be.sufficient to preserve them from ma•terial dissidence.on fhese subjects, without the necessity of strictly reserving tliem for central legislation. ■ -.-■-...

. • •.' (17-) I concur, further, in the suggestion of your No. 76,-of 22nd June, 1849, that as legislation respecting the Native races Is not one of the .subjects exclusively reserved for the general Legislature by the Ordinance of Nov. 18th, the Lieut.- ---• Governors of the Provinces mid yourself, should "■for the present, reserve for Her Majesty's assent or disallowance any Ordinance which may be passed -amending or repealing auy Law affecting the inte- :' rests of the Native race to which the Koyal Assent ■<nas once been given by the Governor. You will th.erefoie take care that a suspending clause be inserted in all such Ordinances without which you •will understand that it is Her Majesty's pleasure 'that they should not be assented to, on Her behalf by 'the Governor or Lieutenant Governors of New Zealand. This instruction will of course apply to any which may be passed relating to expenditure in.which the Native race are interested. . (18.) With respect to the boundaries between the "Provinces, I understand you to be of opinion (from 'your despatch of (?th Feb., 1849,) that there is no substantial objection (representative institutions 4emg for the present, postponed) to that proposed in my despatch.of aßih Feb., 1848, between New ■Ulster and New Muuster. You are therefore authorized to proclaim it at once. .(19.) The separation from New Munster of the .two other projected Provinces, of which and 'New Canterbury are to be the nuclei respectively, •must, for the present, be postponed until the settle'ffient of the latter is somewhat more advanced and the general convenience can be consulted with ; more certainty as to its limits. (20.) It will also be necessary, before these New Provinces are proclaimed, that they should be able to defray the expenses of the establishments which will thus be required, without assistance either from 'the Parliamentary Grant or ftnm the revenue of the -older Piovinces. It is impossible while there is ample.room in the old settlements for all the emigrants who can desire to go to New -Zealand, that Her Majesty's Government should consent to the indefinite multiplication of new settlements at a from those originally formed, except on the ..condition that those who think proper to form such ~ new settlements will be ready, to hear the whole of vthe charges which are thus rendered necessary for • additional Government establishments. I have, fee., (Signed) Obey. True Cony. C. L. Nugext, Private Secretary. PEaCLAMATIONT % flw Excellency Sir George Grey, a Knight Comnpindur of the Must Honorable Order of the liafli, Dover-. ■ !■■ 8. nor and Commaiitler-iii-Cfdi-fiii mid , over the Islands of New Zealand, mid Governor of the Provinces of New Ulster and New Minister, and Vice Admiral of the "same,.£c., <£•..•. Whereas, the undermentioned Ordinaiico enraced by the Governor-in-Chief of New Zealand, r™ '.'J* aflvi< l e nnd cogent °f the Legislative ~-Council thereof, .wns possed in the. Twelfth Year of ■the Eeign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, viz :- An Ordinance*, provide for tlw Establishment of ■ I rovtncml Legislative Councils iv the colony of W'" f n!a:, f" SeS9 i°n 9. No. 1, which Ordinance having been % the Right Honorable Earl Grey, •one of _Her Majesty's Principal Sectaries of State ...laid before the Qneen, Her Majesty has been pleased toconfirm nud allow the same: Now Therefore, I, the Governor-in-Chief of New Zealand do hereby proclaim and make known to till whom it may con-'-cern that Her Majesty lms been graciously pleased to confirm and allow the before mentioned Ordinance. Given under my Hand and Tsstied under the Pulilic Seal of the Islands of New Zealand at Government House nt Auckland in the Province of New Ulster in the Islands aforesaid, this twelfth day of July, in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty. tJ. GnEY, Governor-in-Chief. % His Excellency's Command, C. A. Dji.lov, Civil Secretary. God Save the Queen ! Colonial Secretary's Office, Wellington, Ist August, 1850. HIS EXCELLENCY the LicutemmtGovernor has been pleased to direct, under instructions from the Goverthe' publication of the following Despatches and Additional Royal Instructions, for general information. By His Excellency's Command, Alfred Domett, Colonial Secretary. Government House, ' \ Auckland, Qth July, 1850. ~ Sin, —1 have the honor to enclose for your information the copy of'a Despatch from Earl Grey No". 0 of the 13th of January last, enclosing nddilioiiaf

Instructions under the Itoynl Signet and Sign Manual, appointing certain persons to be Members of the Legislative Council of New Minister, I have to request that you .will cause the confirmation of these appointments by Her Majesty to be notified iv. the Government Gazette of New Muuster. I have the honor to be, Sir, Your most obedient humble servant, G. Gkey. His Excellency The Lieutenant-Governor, ■-.•■■ of New .Minister. (Copy.) . .* ■ • Do ivning -street, ... '"'■'. lUth January, 1850. Sir, —Adverting to that part of my Despatch No. 80, of the y2iid ultimo, in which 1 signified to you that the Queeir had been pleased to confirm' and allow an Ordinance made and passed in the month of November, IS4B, by yourself with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council of New Zealand, intituled " An Ordinance to proviile fur Hie vxtxb- " lishinent of Legislative-Councils in' the colony of "New % calami" I have now to acquaint .you that I have had the honor to hiy before Her Majesty, your Despatches of the numbers and dates noted in the margin reporting the provisional appointment by yourself and the Lieutenant-Governor of New Minister of the following gentlemen--to be Members of Council of ihat Province, viz:— , William McLeod Baxxatyxe, Fhaxcis Dillon Bell, William Hicksox, Geobge Huntisb, Alviieu Ludlam, Geokge Mooiie, : ' David Moxno, Johx Damfobth Gheexwood, Henry Seymouh, and .....: William Oldfiei.i> Oautley, Esquires. I transmit herewith additional Instructions which Her Majesty has been .pleased to issue under the Royal Sign Manual and Signet ratifying and confirming the appointments so made by yourself and the Lieutenant-Governor. I have, &c, GIIEY. Governor Sir George Grey, K. C. 13. &c, &c, Sec. Victoria R. Additional Ikstructioxs to Our Governor inChief of New Zealand, or to the Officer exercising the said office of GoI. s. verrior-in-Chief for the time being, to Oiir Governor nnd Comimuidcr-iu-Chiefiu and over.the Province of New Minister, or to the Officer ejter cising the said office of Governor and : for the time being, or to our Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of New Muuster, or to the Officer exercising the said Office of Lieutenant-Governor for the time being; (Given at Our Court at Windsor this ' fourteenth day of ■January,-1850, in the thirteenth yearof Our -Reign.

Whereas, by an Ordinance made and passed in the Twelfth Year of Our Reign, by the Governor-in-Chief of New Zealand with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council thereof, entitled " An " Ordinance to provide for the establishment- of " Legislative Councils in the colony of New Zealand," it is, amongst other things enacted that for each of the Provinces into which the Islands of New Zealand now are, or may hereafter be divided, there shall be a Legislative Council to consist of not lej£» than nine Members; that the Members js*lhe Executive Council of the Province for the time being shall be Members ex ofticio of the said Provincial Council, and that it shall be lawful for the Governor or the Lientenant-Governor of the Province by Letters.. Patent under the Great Seal of the Province from time ty time to summon and appoint such : other persons as he may think proper, to be personally, or by virtue of his nr their office,: a Member or Members of the said Legislative Council, and that nil such appointments to be made by snch Letters Patent as oforesaid without Our previous Warrant, shall be provisional only, ami subject to our confirmation or disallowance, but shall be valid to all intents and purposes, and irrevocable until Our pleasure shull ■ have been signified thereupon. Akd Whereas, you, Our Governor us aforesaid, did, in pursuance and in the exercise of the power so vested in you, appoint provisionally and until Oiir pleasure should be kuown, Our'trusty and well beloved, , . William McLeod .Banxatyse, Kbaxcis Dillon Bell, William Hickson, : George Hukter, Alfred Ludlam, George Moore, , : , . , Davib MoxBO; Doctor of Medicine, John Da.mfomk Greenwood, and Henry Seymour, Esquires, : to be Members of the Legislative Council of the Province of New Mnuster. And Whereas yon, Our Lieutenant .Governor of Our Province of New Muuster did appoint provisionally, and until Our pleasure should be known, William Oldfield Cautley, Esquire, to be a Member of the Legislative Council of the said Province of New Munster. • Now, therefore, in pursuance of the-said recited Ordinance, and in exercise of the powers thereby vested in Us, We do, by these Our additional Instructions under Our Sign Manual and Signet, ratify and confirm the said appointments, and do declare Our Pleasure to be that the said William McLeod Bannatynk, Francis Dillon Bell, William Hicksos, George llunteii, Alfred Ludlam, George Moore, 5 David Movno, Johx Dami-orth Greexwood, lltxitr Seymour, and William Oldfield Cau'tley, shall be Members of said Legiblation Connci>of the Province of New Munster. V. R. Colonial Secretary's Office, Wellinijton, 25th July, 1850. HIS EXCELLENCY the LieutenantGovernor directs the publication of the following Memorandum addressed to his Honor the Superintendent of Nelson, of an expedition into the interior of the Southern Island of New Zealand. By His Excellency's Command, Alfred Domett, Colonial Secretary. ' (Copy.) , Memorandum of an Expedition iiil'o tho Interior of the Southern Island of

New' Zealand, undertakai by Mr. Dash wood, ami Capt. Mitchell, for tlie purpose of finding an inland route from the Wairau to the Port, fiooper ' 'Plain*: '• April 22, 1850. /, ' : ■ Wcllingtoii; June 11,1800. Sin, —Aware '. of the very ..great interest felt by the Government, and the public in general, on the subject-of-an inland route from; the Nelson: district to the Port Cooper Plains, 1 have tile, honor to lay before you; with us liulc.delay us possible the result of an expedition into the interior of the' South Island, undertaken by Mr. Dasliwood and lHyself, from which we have just returned; '. •/-. A few hurried notes I despatched from the Wairau informed you that Mr. Dashwood and myself had nlready made a short excursion up the Waiopi; on which occasion from the top of v hill whence the Wuiopi derives its principal source, we discovered a valley running iv uS.S.W. direction. This valley it was now our,object to explore. Before proceeding I had perhaps better recapitulnte the* chief observations I made on that occasion, iuhl give the bearings of the principal landmarks taken-from a mountain to which. I have heard a very sanguinary apellation given, but whicji I. propose to call Mount Shepherd, and a high range of liills'on Mr. Cauiley's back run. From Mount Shepherd the Kaikoras boi-is' North East extreme, E.N.E.; S.W. extreme: W.S.W.— Tbey appeared übput twenty miles distant. ,1 could distinctly trace an extensive valley running along their biise; concerning which I could not then'gain iiny information. I have since made every enquiry from those well acquainted with the coast but with-! put success. Its existence appears unknown.— | There did not seem to be any opening through the ' Kuikorns.

On the llth April we ascended the Cantley range. The morning was densely foggy, but about 11 o'clock it partially cleared. A gorge running S.K. (it formed one of the boundaries of Mr. Cautley's run) had a promising appearance of leading to rii open'country. It was; however, intercepted with much bush. Ben Opi bore N. a little E. v Mount Shyuheixl K.N.E., his brother S.E. by S. The range of hills forming the East boundary of the Wiiirau, and West of the Waiopi, ran in a half a circle from North by the West to South. The mouth of Wainui N.N.E. I could only see the S.W! extreme of the Kaikoras—it bore W.S.W.

1 now commence oiir second expedition, premising that we took with us a mare and a mule carrying übout '-2 cwt. each, and were accompanied by Harris, ail old whaler.

After easy travelling along the banks of the Waiopi for thirty miles iv a general S.S.W.direction, (the first fifteen of which appeared a good sheep country) I sve reached Starvation .Hill from which we had previously seen the valley on the 27th April. On the 2!) th we ascended it. A good hill horse is required to carry a load up this hill. It was as much us our aninmls could'do.- On reaching the top weunloaded, and proceeding along the range to the VVest to a higher peak, we found the three highest summits of the Kaikoras bore due E. To the West, the tops of a dense mass of hills were alone visible. From Starvntion Hill diie South, stands a peculiar pyramidical hill, we named it Mount lmpey.. It is a capital landmark. Oji my former visit it was remarkable for hnviug snow upon it some distance from the top, while the top itself was quite* bare, from which it would appear to be volcanic, and at times iv an'active state. But vow it was covered entirely with.snow. Descending into the valley, the travelling became rough;, rocks, spenr grass, and the plant called Wild Irishman everywhere abounding. The valley appears never to have been fired, there is nc' fern or- lin'sh in it, but the Wild IrishmunSupplied us, with; good firewood. Here we experienced,a most .extraordinary severe frost, never iv England have I felt it'so intensely cold. The banks'aud the Hocks in the river were masses of immense icicles; and our clothes were frozen hard and stiff two minutes after we had,taken .them off.;; , A. - -....' . '... .;..■... . • .....

We now kept the river which is joined by a large stream from the east. The valley had ns yet been very ; narrow, but for two miles it now became broader; I will give its course by compass ings at the-find of my letter. The country then again, changed, the river increased by small..inoun tain streams from east and west,- aiid hemmed 1 in by precipitous rocks, became deep arid diffi cult, ami in many places dangerous to cross. Impossible as it was, however, to wall: along Us ;high rugged sides, or wake any way, through, the solid phalanx of spear grass and Wild Irishman, which in these parts grow'to a size and strength undreamt of by those wliose shins have not'come in contact with this most formidable enemy, >ve,,were) obliged to.wfl.de. for miles along the edge oi:fl shelf of rocks from which the mule slipped twice, spo'iliiig all. our biscuit.. Had it been summer; the' niirrow bottoms "lnigh't lmVebeen burnt, but attest, this gorge will always /deserve its. name of the " Grip." .

~ After, fiyo miles of this amphibious .travelling the valley again opened,, and' Mr. Dashwnod Vnd iriypelf having clambered a hill, discovered,' much J to our delight, ft beiuitiful vnlley rii'nuiug north and "soijtb. A river which had its source iu'some small hills .at pur feet, wound through it.. The. width of. the.,val.ley I shonhl suppose to be about four, or five miles. On each side ran low undulating hiils, backed to the east by a high 'mountain'range, the very picture of a perfect sheep grazing country. ; At the distance we were, to judge of the, quality of the, grass was impossible: though the height of tlie above the levelof tbVsea perhapsrendered tliis' part too cold for good grass, and unfit for sheep. We liad the ■honor to attach your name, Sir, ; to this valley. And il js ivy.firm belief, that, ere; long, the great south i"oad, will traverse. Bichniond.Valley. Looking down it from the hill'on which'we stood, noimpedi- !- ment whatever could be discerned.- ' Sir. Dasfiwbod believed it to be the Kaiparatebau.; I ami not sufficiently acquainted :with the" geography of the north 1 .east coast.tojUftzaid an,opinion, but I.feelconv.incea -it .is the Same valley I.before mentioned as having ;distihctly'traced 'from 1 *Mpunt Shepherd running dt the 'base of the Kaikdras. 1 It Is separated"' from •Acheron Valley,(as Ipropose.to calUhejvnlley along .which we joprneyed, .M.S.. Jt/ieron,) by .easy low, hills, over which you .might t iipw' drive a "cart, and tbAis Starvation' tifiY,%e isevii''s;dnp"i amTour enemies,: the pnckle"s, : would ; If the river does.run into the'sea'atiN.Ev.itmay.'be the A>atere,' or the Blind to [the south of Awfttere.,; But,tliis js ( iinere supposition.,, It. ought to be immediately explored. Mount Impey bore S.S.E;;alittle : S.ithe s Kaik6rasN;N.E. : " . • _ May 3rd.^—Again obliged ito take to the river;the banks,being,so l densely .with, our t we.U; armed vegetable opponents, as f , T to be impassable P r y&k™tyvip .We aiteiiipted' to flre,' Vni alas! in am •[ it -was/too f wet'.' '•' I'he ■ valley' liad : iiow gradually increftsed to r the'width-of ! tw'o:miles- with improving grass:which;might dofqr f cattle, v ,Alarge ; river Acheron vale from west. The east.bank liad, bjerifiie'd. : !

May 4th.—Harris and* myself had to return six strayed during the pightr Mr. Dashwood an, t^e. 4 menntime"as"ceiided alow range of hills' to ! ' the west,-'aud' discovered a I iiamediafte'r ;him.: : He ;'describea iiti as grassy—half; a inilejwiae,;(vnd;its course, S,'by, yf.,,&\\<L, ,N.,by E. -It - ran' into Acheron ■ valley e^.e.:;; ; "; ■', ■*■■' '"- "-- :;: { ". ,; - , ■-■* J,;:::f \->

."! ?.*? c whjch'w'e 5 tfaveiie'd'had liecdnie, h coneiderable , Stream, and'it behoved US'. to bo careful wlierernisrosged,! Cpgi.mipg p]j;itß'bank/oi);tiie possibility of fortling at the point where wo*th^n

stood, the horse and mule suddenly dashed inland' proved the impracticability by swimming, across, and leaving;usin.the lurch. Some, distance, further down* we managed with much difficulty ,to' ford it', aud regain bur^steeds. The lulls for about fleveh miles to the west are low andunidulatiilg. A-high' snowy; range:■ then-rises and ruus: parallel with" AcheroniVale, ifrom which the rivers and streams appear to derive their source. . ~ , : :....,.

' Tin's part of the country would be' wellworth exploringi •' Two hoi ses could- carry provisions for tliree months.;"ample.time during long days in fine weatherto,cxamine the valleys,, and. to survey the country east.and west from the hills .which are all easy of ascent.. ' * • ■ >• •

* The soil nnd grass here were much improved, and good cattle stations might-be formed.ibut I fear- the immense, quantity of.spear grass, aud other prickles would prove an , obstacle for sheep. , ; May horses recrossed. the river during the night;aiid'Mr.'Dashwood and 'Harris returned for them. I climbed a hill, but owing to the fog mid clouds could make but-little'out. A river from N.N.E. ran into. Acheron Vale «at W.. A high snowy range ran N.W. by N. to S.E. by S. The fog precluded my seeing more.. , ' ""''.'.

On the highest peak of 'the hill I had ascended was a bed of small broken stones, to all appearance of granite, of a very considerable depth. 1 tried to get at the soil with a< stick without success. , They gave one the idea of stones put on a recently finished Macadamized road:—they were broken to 'the' size of those used in Ehglriud for private park roads, and were smoothed as if with, a shovel. : The whole top for some distance down was covered with them.

Some shrubs,—Anniseed, Wild Geranium, and Parsley;— Ducks, both black and blue; WikVs, Cranes, Paradise Gfiese, Quails, Grasshoppers, and Flies, seemed to denote improving country, and to hint that we were Hearing the coast;—at least so we interpreted it/ On,an expedition of this kind there ought always to be a dog arid gun' amongst the party. As it was, our dog' caught us , more Wika'S ' than *we : could.eat; but ducks, Paradise geese, and quail, would have been dainties we could have daily dined off had we had a gun. ,

The first certain.'sighs of Maorieswe discovered on the Oth—a quantity of firewood collected and the remains of a whari gave certain evidence of an old Maori'encampment.i ; The.Valley at,this part was not more than, three or four hundred yards wide, in places much less. The hills on both sides were covered'with snow. The river turns at right angles to the east another, large ; one (the Poynter), ruuning into it. from the west. On regaining an eminence I discovered a valley three quarters a mile wide. The hills on either side were covered with grass, and in the distance—for the first time since leaving the Waiopi—was busili of black birch and manuka. . The valley ran due east and west. We had now evident signs of the banks of the . river having recently been burnt, probably by natives passing along the coast. ; The soil still continued improving, and travelling easy; and here I have to record an irrepairable loss. When midway across the river. I found it deeper, and the stream more rapid than I had anticipated; so, to prevent my note book getting damaged, I held up my blue shirt, imd dropped ray eomptiss from the pocket,—the only one with the party. . I have taken correct bearings of. the valley for forty miles, the lemuiuder is guess work. A stream from the north, another from S:W., joined the river. ■•' i * - ■■- ;

Acheron .Valley:now: became impassable, so Mr. Dashwood aud myself set out on. a stirveyiug expedition. , Having arrived at the top of Vhe highest hill we were rewarded for our labour by a bird's'eye view of a most magnificent"country. To the south we commanded' nt least ! one hundred miles in a direct line. The sea between die coast Jon the plains and Bank's, Peninsula hud the appearance of a TUver, Ynd'a succession of "extensive, phiiiis to the 1 S.W., mijiht easily be mistaken for one vast'prairie, To the N.E. and E. Mr. Dashwood (who was.on a differeutknoll) saw the sea iind, the low hills about Cape Campbell. ,

Ivow I felt the loss of my conipnss. Well known land mnrks in every direction, and unable-to take bearings

;;-Jley 11th.—We liad up to this period -been fol - lowing the river running through, Acheron .Valleyj which from subsequent enquiry I have every"reason to believe was the Waiptipa or Big Kiyerpf the whalers. But novvleaving it running to the N.E., we returned a short distance and took the .stream :I before mentioned as joining from the S.W. The valley through which it ran we named the Valley of Hope. Keeping along it we mounted a hill from which the stream derives , its' source. On tlie : south side of this hill another river takes' its rise,; and and runs in a south-westerly direction. -We descended a spur (clothed with, black birch-bush thro' which there is'not any difficulty in leadingaiiorse) oirttie west side, and came to the'bed' of- the' Hiver which is one of the sources oHhe Wairhou. .-Keeping this for eleven miles we entered,an.extensive plain, (Hamilton plain). The grass, (very, good) was interspersed withfern; arid ag'reatdeal of manuka grew in'patches;,' A large swamp, in , whiclv we I nearly left the niare, occupied- the: centre; 1 various /mountain; stieams ran through it into the ,Wailioii. It weuldprove valuableforcattlestations.; Returning towards what we supposed to be the coritinua lion'of the same river described above ns the source I of the WaihoUi we'eame to our surprise'upon an I entirely-different river running in a .direction, exactly. opppsite,to that of the former, which it joins where we met it.. At ,tliis"spot, both turned sud-; 'de'iily' to' the eastward, at' directly fright angles ' to their previous'cdurses; aiidfiowed down' to the sea as-one broad river r the, Wailiou;-: Some idea tnayjhe fOrmed of,its size from the t fact'of, ( our', crossing the southerly stream in seven distinct'channels. On nearing'the shore the last channel'bec.a'me suddenly deep. ; Taken by 'surprise , Twas carried'bff my legs, and immersed I but scrambling, came up again, and perceived a t {rusty stick held out to me. ; Seizing it, I was-dragged,on shorejby the same hand and the .j same stick that fiad'once before "done : me the 'iume good 'myfriend Dashwobd.' ! ;; : Other plains I liave no doubt: exist to the southwest; but for three days we could scarcely, see the outline of the hills through the fog, although ,iiot three miles, distant.."',' , | ' i '"' ' "•''•■'• 1 ' We" now weiided'our along"'a sweet'! pretty 'valley/ > The ■ river which was in bne'brpad s stream surroiuiiled numerous Islands covered with/.wqfld. .Qn the .hills, ,the. flax; fern, and ti tree was thegeneral herbage j but the spear grass and Wild irishman, still made their appearance in 'a : diminutiVe 'form. Tn;sbme ! ra'rg'e bottoms offlftf adres'dlose tb'the'bcd of the river, which I'supposelfrom their nppeftrnhce to have been at somp peuod inundated; and in the gullies, between the lulls,' the' soil was particulaily i irh, producing flax of an extraordinary height and size. Issuing from this valley we burst upon the finest grazing plain I have e\er seen in this or ( any other country. I know it is the fate'of travellers to be accused of exaggeration ; but I care not, as long as I call attention to the splendid inlaud plains. I will therefore attempt a description from the , hasty obiei vations I was onabled to take. , The plain surrounded by low undulating grassy hills backed by higher ranges,—is bowl'shaped, and contains not less than 2(JO,000 acres (I believe much more.) Two rivertt, the Waihou J aud; Hdru nni, run through it parallel to each,other,.at) eight miles distance. , The grass is of the best desciiption, and the soil m many placea'Dt for cultivation. It had a'pejfect natural drainage, 'is well sheltered from all winds, has no swainpa—but nlso' I much fear, no wood. ' , » 1 I 1 may; at, once say, that .through this plain over some easy low lulls to tho' south', is the

direct route to Port Cooper. '.But w;e— ignores'tiTof the country, ; with ynpidly dimimstiing-.pi-er.isious,! without compass, and in thick deemed, jt', morepind'e'nt to make Motunau" by ilie cWit*' where 1 we knew there was , a station I .' ''' ■■';';" <^'Hj,; t

fl Keeping the Waihou' for'five tered a gully/but sbon ; finding lit impassable* tookl6j- ;- the bills from which weobtainedga viejv.of the sea. Descending into another extensive plain" witii' inore< swamp, butequally good'grazing capabilities , last, we crossed some more' , hills 'and rea'chdd'UieC doast.. Thesehills,by,the seaside ai-e covered- with* fern, flax,ti-iree, toitoi, and manuka,, , l ,, l ; i . . " May '23rd.—Finding the cliffs yerpendjculnr'and* no possibility of gaining the 'bencli, "ftr^Tfefuriiijdf' , 8f part , of our Inst day's walk and taking .a"sotitUei-ly. direction came-to a hill from which w<! espied $'firfe"on the plain below. .Lighting; another in answerjo, it, ■.■Wβ remained sometime on the. look ost' fVr sigiv of mail'; but nope 1 we 'made''jtlie ! - Y cynsV near a's'alt lagoon'to the- north of the HiiririUU About 8 o'clock in the eveningSVe heard aicpoieiug and ' shortly: had, the pleasure of coming sLlr, Cayerhill of. Motunaw, who had been- on put for,ms for some timei and had" followed o'iSi-tiacif for three days/ Piloted by him'acr6sfe the l "Rut U'tiui (a rapid deep and dangerous river) we arrived-nfchte house, where we obtained all we fpQd,'i"cst, clothes, and money. . ... ( . , <t ~ ','.':'*',..: From thence leaving Harris, we 'started for Port Cooper. Losing ourselves on the plains l ing too close to the sea, & violent snow storm over* took us, and getting entangled in the swamps "over which no horse could.venture, we, wajidered for two days, on the third almost starved froni' J want : l pj food'and cold (we had not had afire since' we Start-' ed, not having any tinder or matches< withiusj , v,t shouldered our blankets and;, leaving 6uf jliorses made through the swamp to Kaiapoi., ~ .In due time we reached* the Town of Lytt'leton. which, with the plains', are too well known fe 1 render a description from me" neitUer! is- - it the purport of this letter to give-one. .Snffice jit therefore, to say, that all I had heard initheir/ayqur didnpt come up, in my opinion, to' the reuVit'y. ,!i was surprised and delighted at'the extent 1 of the land, arid richness of : the soil, the amount>of nsefal work done, and the lasting, solid, yet. rfeat,<mßuner in which it has been executed. It does rvery_, gyeat credit to all concerned. ! .''.,'"

And now, sir, in conclusion, l'haye only" to ? add that Mr. Dashwood and myself both'regref- ! '«uV'ii'a tbility to furnish more satisfactory informatidn.'of the country adjacent to that through f which. we travelled, but the, loss of our compass in an utterly unexplored, and unknown country, '(he shortness of the days, the continual thick weatbe'r, venud our seeing'a mile before us for days,.and thfe storms of snow, sleet, hail, and rain, rendered,that which may henceforth easily,be accomplished in ten days, a difficult and laborious journey of six'iveeks.

I have purposely omitted nil adventures merely personal; my aim being, not to write a tetter,' but ah attempt to give a clear, succinct .account, useful to future travellers, which with the: kind and able assistance of Mr. Hamilton of the Ada ion, who knows the gieater part of the country o\er which I travelled after I lost m; compass, X Lope m a short time to make more comprehensible by, a correct map, I have the honor to be, Sir, Your obedient servant, W. Muiuiay Mitch ftl. t'npt. 81ih llegt. His Honor the Siipciiiitendent, Nelson. The following is the of .Vclieiou —■ S. by E. . ii miles, W. . ,i W.'S.W. ii S.W. by S. 7 '" ■ S. 0 E.S.E. £ « S. 1 8 S.E. 1J « s.s.w. a «« S. by W. 1% « S. by E. » S.W. by S. ,2 " S.S.W. If « S. lj « S. bj E. l< » E. a little Noith 3 " Here v\e left the nver running N.E. and I lost my compass. Colonial Secretary's Office, Wellington. SlhAiujuU, 1850. mENDERS will be recoiml at this L Office, on or before the 15th inst. fioni persons willing to build for, or let to the Government, a building suitable for a Colonial Hospital in the Town of Wellington. Further particulars may be obtained upon application at the Survey OJfice. Tenders* to be in Duplicate, Sealed and endorsed, •' Tenders to Build ( or let, (as the case may's be,) a Building for Colonial Hospital, , ' - , By bis Excellency's Command, 'AtritKD 'Domett, - * Colonial Secretary: rpOTAL Amount of Notes incirculaL tion'at the Office of; the Colonial Bank of Issue, at -Wellington, >on the 27th day of July, 1850. ( , Amount of Notes incirunlntion on the 27th day of 'Jnlj'lßso, being the close of the preceding*four weeks : — _ , £5 and upwards '£' <£%() under M t ! '1719 - Total £, 21.10 •, - Total amount of Goiu' held by the aboYedoffifco on the same 'day : — ,•,• t , L s ,t , Gold , , £ ~702 t t Siher ' 1437 ' r 'Total. .<.... £ .' ' ', I, PET;HE,' > the"'C6ldnial Treasurer,' do hereby dertify' tliai; r tlie aboVd a true account'as tec^uired"liy the Ordinance No: 16,"Sessibn f, Bi ' ' , , Heniiy vv ,Pctre, ~ . s, , , CjOtoniafj Treasurer. Dated this.29th day, of July 1850.(0 . Colonial Treasury, Wellington,..*)'-.-/.

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LATEST ENGLISH NEWS., Wellington Independent, Volume VI, Issue 504, 10 August 1850

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5,709

LATEST ENGLISH NEWS. Wellington Independent, Volume VI, Issue 504, 10 August 1850

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