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A REPREHENSIBLE PRACTICE.

The danger to equestriam and drivers aaused by the firing at the butts has again been brought under our notice. On Saturday afternoon aiady who was driving down towards the Heads bad a very narrow esoape from a serious aooident owing to some of the firing party, who were on the mound close to the road, not waiting until she had passed before discharging their rifloß, the report of which caused the horse to bound to the other side of tbe road and nearly upset the trap. No sooner had this I danger been overcome and the horse and trap got bsok on to the road just past tbe mound than two shots in quick succession were fired, with the result that the frightened animal again made a bound to tbe other side Of the road and tried to bolt. This sort of thing will have to be put a ttop to at once, or a fatal accident will roiulfc.and tho range be dosed. A little consideration for other peoplo't feelings and safety would •aye all unpleasantness, but it seems some volunteers have no thought for anything but their own convenience; whilst others are solioitous for the safety of tho publio, and most oareful not to oause risk of aocident, not firing when a horse (driven or ridden) is either approaohiag or receding from tbe firing point, until sufficiently distant to oause no alarm or danger. If all volunteers were as oomiderate and well mannered there would be no compaints of the kind now referred ta, whioh we trust will be the lasts we ihall hear on the subject.

%• On our fourth page will be found a large amount of interesting telegraphic and Volunteer nene,

For the position of truant officer 160 applications have been received by the Wellington Eduoation Board.

A. regatta is to be held at Wellington during the Exhibition. The date has not yet bsen fixed.

The percentage of lambi in tho Munawatu distriot thii season was very good. Few are below 90 and many are above 100, says a correspondent.

A meeting was held at Brunswiok on Friday evoning in oonneotion with the ereotion of a Publio Hall. Mr Arthur Wright generously donated a pieoe of land for the site, and £52 was subioribed in the room.

A Napier olergyman on Sunday night, the 18th inst,, preaohed against Sunday oyoling, whioh r«ises the question whether this same preaober seos any harm in olergymen working horses on a Sunday?-Ex-change.

It was reported recently that Dr Nansen was to b» re-married to his wife, from whom (aooording to the Paris correipondent of the Daily Mail) before his voyage he had been legally separated, "in order to permit her to marry again, in ease of his disappearance or death, without going to the trouble of proving his deoease."

The members of the Wellington City Oounoil have forwarded to tfiss Fisher, daughter of tbe Mayor, Mr G. Fisher, a handsome present, in view of her approach, ing marriage. The nature of the selection was a handsome assortment of outlery, together with a lovely pair of vases of unique design in ivory and gold.

It is stated (says the Feilding oorres. pondentof the New Zealand lim*«) that out of forty odd applicants for the situation as olerk and treasurer to a certain local body, every one stated his religious creed with the exception of one, and the members decided to eleot him, and found after he had been installed into offioe that he was an ex parson. Fact !

Mr Willis visited Fordell on Satnrday evening, and addressed a most attentive audienoe. The meeting was well attended, Mr T Higgie being voted to the ohair. At the oonolusion, Mr Willis received a unanimous promise of support, those present expressing their intention of assisting him by every means in their power.

The pulpit at St Paul's Ohnroh was oooupied morning and evening yesterday by the Bey. G B Munro, of Bemnera, Auokland, who preached instructive and interesting discourses to large congregations. The musical portion of the servioe was made additionally attractive by the rendering of Dr Staincr's "Ye snail abide in the Land," the soloists being Miss Byers and Mr Hamilton. The rev. gentleman will also preaoh at St. Paul's next Sunday.

The fifth free entertainment in the Oddfellows' Hall on Saturday evening was scarcely as successful as tho previous meetings, although there was a good attendance. Mr G Brnoe, of Ohriitohurch, oooupied tbe ohair, an address was given by Mr Bobert Tuoker, reoitatlons were contributed by Messrs B W Green and Digbio, longs by Messrs Thompson, Krone, Wylie and Taylor, and a dialogue on 'The question of the hour' by Messrs Hadfiold, 0 Sharpe, H Gilberd, OUiver and Marsden.

The Southland Times reports the death at the Southland Home, of Mr Thomas Tofield, who made the set of golden horse shoes that the pioneer diggers were wont to blow about when speaking of the palmy days of alluvial mining on Bendigo. He was 81 years old, and had been more then half his hfetimo in [the colonies. [These shoes were not made iv the Bsndigo district, but in the Ovens at Yaokimdundah. They were only kept on an hour or so, and the horse riddon oarefully off the motal on the grass by the roadside.—E d, W.H.]

The anniversary of the Aramoho Weileyan Sunday Bohool was celebrated yesterday, Mr George Spurdlo speaking in the morning, and the Bey G Bond conducting the services in the afternoon and evening, all of which were largely attended. Speoial hymns were rendered by the ohildren, assisted by friends, under the conduotorsbip of Mr W H Bird. The services were most enjoyable, and the singing refleoted very great credit on the painstaking and oapabl'e instructor. To-morrow evoning the anniversary lea and entertainment will be held. Tea will be on the tables at 6 80, and we understand that an ezoellent programme has been arranged for the after mooting.

A memorial service was held at the Weileyan Churoh yesterday morning, when the Sev. G 1 Bond oondnoted an impressive sorvice. He based his remarks on the text " To die is gain," and feelingly referred to the death of Mrs Horace Bixon, a late mem> of the choir and church, and Mr John B Henderson. At the conclusion of the service the congregation remained standing while Miis Bassett, the organist, played "The Dead Marah in Saul." The f aneral of Mrs Dixon took plane in the afternoon, and was largely attended, the members of tbt ohoir uniting round the grave and singing " Book of Ages." Four of Mr Dixon's fellow-operators in the Telograph OfficeMessrs W Maboney, A Elliott, F Oliver, and I P Criohton— aoted as pall-beaiers, and the Hot. Mr Bond conducted the fnneral service.

The result of the self-denial week in connection with the local branch of the Salvation Army hat bten most successful, no less a snm than £137 having been raised, and it is expected that the amount will be brought up to £140. This amonnt is nearly £60 in excess of that railed last year, and £15 more than the corps were expected to collect. Last year Wangsnni's contribution was beaten by only one or two corps, Dunedin then heading the list. As the oorps that raises the largest amount is presented with 10 guineas and a corset, the local members of the Army are anxiously waiting to hear the figures from the larger oentres, »g they confidently expect to oconpy the pride of position. It is rather singular tbat Captain Maokay, the officer in charge of the Wanganui corps, was stationed at Dunedin last year.

We understand that several estates in the Kai Iwi and near the Westmere Lake are to be sut up into seotions, and offered to the public.

The Bowling Green was too soft for play on Saturday, as was aljo Victoria Park; eonstquentlv tho match at the latter ploce between the College and the Wanganni Club bad to be postponed.

The first shipment of the season, of wool from this port, goes forward from the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Oom> pan?, per Stormbird to-night for transhipment at Wellington per Buahint.

Owing to the rise in wheat, the price of flour has advanced 10s per ton, and is likely to still further advance before the close of the montb, as reports from Australia, America, and India, indicate a srrioun shortage of wheati

Mr B N Lifßton, Secretary to the loijbl A. and P. Association, requests us to state that he will bo glad if intending exhibitors at the forthcoming show of the Wanganui Association will send in their entries in good time, and thus save unnecessary trouble.

The Collier Two-speed Gear Cyola Co,, Molbourne whioh was reoently floated with a oapital of L 20.000 have pnrohased the Carbine Oyole Woiks from Linooln Staart, Limited. The new concern will be carried on at the worki, Prince's Bridge.—Australasian.

The case of Jacobion v Bronnan was continued at the Magistrate's Court this morning, before Mr 0 0 Kettle, B.M. Mr Vitzherbert, for the defendant, briefly ad' dressed His Worship, and Mr Jaoobsen followed on his own behalf, engaging the attention of the Magistrate for over two hours. Judgment was reserved.

Tb« Wairere goes to Pipiriki to-morrow at 7 a.m. Tbe tourist season has now oommenoed and a large number of visitors are ooming along for this popular trip. Next month the steamer will run twio* a week. Messrs Hatriok and Co'i now steamer for the river trafflo beyond PipiriM is ex. pected in January neir.

The ladies of the local Baptist Churoh have been for some time preparing for a sale of needlework. This takes plaoe tomorrow evening at tho Ohuroh, Ingestre. street, commencing at 7.80. A number of musical items will be rendered by the ohoir, and we understand refreshments will be on sale during the evening.

The quarterly drill of the Alexandra Cavalry will be held on the racecourse next Saturday morning, commencing at 10 o'olook. As the mounted corps of tbe West Coast Battalion of this Island are to all have a new regulation uniform of the same pattern, the order for thoso for the local oorps goes Home, by tho next mail, and those members who have not vet been measured are requested to have the same done without delay.

An exceptionally fine photograph of the late Hon John Ballanoe in Mr Martin's studio attraoted muoh attention on Saturday night. The photo, whioh is a speaking likenois, is handsomely framed, with a heavy mourning line surrounding it, and bears t^e following inscription:— "Our late brother, the Hon John Ballnncs, P.M., Premier and Legislator. He loved the people. Presented to Lodge St Andrew Kil winning by B. Meuli, P.M."

It is stated that at the end of this year the Belgian Government, in conjunction with tho Oetend Chamber of Commerce, will commenoe work on a system of docks to extend between one and two miles inland, and to cost three million!. Spacious warehouses are to be erected on the quays, and powerful hydranlio cranes are to be placed at intervale round the quays. Dry docks are also to be oonstruoted. It is expected that the dooks will be completed in five years.

A most enjoyable afternoon was spent at the Druids' Hall on Saturday, when Miss May Watt's Dupile' "At Home " was held. Tbe room had boon nicely deoorated for tho occasion, and the oostumss of the youthful danoers were very pretty and beooming. Afternoon tea was provided, the table being most artistically laid ont and* ornamtntsd with flowers. Mist .Allen supplied tho music Miss Watt's pupils showed great profioienoy and went through several gymnastio exercises and musioal drill moat oreditably. Speoial mention must be made of two minuets and a sailor's hornpipe, the the latter being prettily danced by the little Minos Phyllis Barnicoat and Daisy Parsons.

A retired Civil Servant—without a pencion — is one of the moit spineless creatures on tha face of the earth. Compared to him a jellyfish is a being with a backbone of iron. He— the ex-Oiyil Servant— has so long been aooustomed to look npon tbe Government as his father and his mother that when its aid is suddenly withdrawn from him he falls prostrate in an amorphous moaning heap- He feels utterly helpless when cast out without provision into a cold, bard, rudely-competing world, which has to hnstle for its living, and can £/> nothing but wring his soft white hands aW wish he had never been born. — Melbourne Pnnoh.

Whsn Persimmon won the Derby for the Prinoe of Wales the raoe was photographed at high specd — over 2000 impressions on one long negative, and the operator hurried off to London at onoe. Ihat night, by means of the kinematograph, the raoe, with the struggling horses and th* rush and movement of the crowd, including the rush of the tins of thousands across the oourso at the finish, was shown life size to the audience at the Alhsmbra. This is the marvellous invention that will be introduced to Wanganui audiences next Saturday with the Charles Godfrey Company, the advanoe manager, Mr Edward Geaoh, having arrived to complete neoessary arrangements. Suoh a brilliant combination will doubtless enjoy s, prosperous season. That horses hare good memories is borne out by the fact thai, one whioh had been impounded lately at Durie Town, wended its way bsok in the middle of the night » few weeks after, and by baoking against the gate of the pound woke the ketper up. When the latter went ont to see what was the matter the equino viiitor neighed a recognition and plainly intimated that ht wanted to be impounded again. He was accommodated and made straight for the hay rack, where his owner found him next morning finishing off the remains of (h« statutory feed. So well satisfied was the horse with it that he stubbornly refused to leave the pound and it took his disgusted owner some time to get the horse away. He now has to hobble it at night to keep It from returning to the pound, and putting him to the time and expense of releasing it !

The death of Mr John Henderson at the age of 62 on Saturday makes another gap in the ranks of the old settlers. It is now over 80 years since the late Mr Henderson started business in Wanganui in partnership with Mr Paul (now of New Plymonth) in the old Bidgway Street Brewery. Later on Mr Henderson continued the business on bis own account, and then was joined by Mr T Farrar. As a brewer Mr Henderson gained a great reputation, and euooeeded in winning first prize for ale at the Amerioan Centennial Exhibition. Old residents will reoolleet Mr Henderson as one of the founders of tho St Andrew "©twinning Lodge, and also as a member of the Wanganui Fire Brigade, of whioh he was lieutenant at the time the Butland Hotel was burned down. The funeral will leave his Into resi. ctonoe, St Hill Street, at 2.80 to>morrow afternoon,

The Thermopyln on her hit trip from Capetown to Melbourne, encountered some heavy weather during the voyage, and had a unique experience among ioeburgs, in the Southern Ooean, The r Checmopyln left London on the 226 th of August, and at noon on 22nd September an ioeberg was seen half a mile long and 610 ft high. Numerous small pieces, very dangerous to shipping, were in the vioinity. At eight o'clock the same night and at midnight other large ones were notiood sot very far off; At daylight on the 23rd September a large bere, with perpendicular side and flat top. three-quarters of a mile long and over 400ffc high, was passed, also several other large bergs, besides numerous large pieces dangerous to shipping. Altogether fully 100 bergs, all dangerous to navigation, were seen in the space of 1000 miles long by 20 miles broad. Thermometrio readings of the temperature of the steamer were taken about one mile apart, as the large ioebergs were approaohed or left behind, for the purpose of finding out if this would be any guide to enable ship masters to localise ice. The result was that no movement of temperature could be depended on. The steamer made the run from Capetown to Melbourne in 19 days 7 hours, the fastest passsge en record between the ports.

Worms derange the whole system. Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator deranges worms, and gives rest to the sufferer.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WH18961026.2.9

Bibliographic details

A REPREHENSIBLE PRACTICE., Wanganui Herald, Volume XXX, Issue 8992, 26 October 1896

Word Count
2,754

A REPREHENSIBLE PRACTICE. Wanganui Herald, Volume XXX, Issue 8992, 26 October 1896

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