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Wanganui Herald. [PUBLISHED DAILY.] SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1896. INTERESTING STATEMENTS.

Mr Patterson, who the other evening undertook to tell the people of Wanganui how beneficjal Prohibition had proved to Kamas, among other things went; on to say that the people there travelled more than those of New Zealand, whom, he said, could not afford to visit the Old Country because they spent the necessary money on drink. And this statement, or rather mis-statement, was loudly applauded by the advocates of Prohibition ! Well, what are the facts ? Is it not the case that during the past few years a large number of residents of this town and district — moderate drinkers — have visited the Mother Country, and all the other countries en route to boot j many of them going Home by way of Suez and returning via San Francisco ? Tb it not equally true that of the large number of passengers who go Home on a trip from New Zealand ninetenths of them are not total abstainers or Prohibitionists ? But if Mr Patterson's assertions were true that the people of Kansas go away to enjoy themselves in countries where Prohibition is unknown, what would prove but that they hoarded up their savings to have a " good time " where people could eat and drink what they liked, and without being dogged by " bootleggers " soliciting them to infringe a hateful law by buying vile whisky at an exhotbitaat price, or having to perjure themselves to get a medical certificate that they were entitled to purchase liquor from a licensed chemist! Mr Patterson was also good enough to tell his hearers that where he came from they had burnt their saleyards, and that if anyone wanted to buy steers or other live stock they had to go to the farmer direct for them. Does he not kuow that saleyards, auction room?, stores and shops are modern aids to trade, aud that those who have tm'nga to sell or \ who wish to buy find it better to do bo in open v arket than to follow the j rule Mr "Pitternon says obtains in! Kansas? If there were no public!

markets there could be no reliable basis o£ values, as every farmer would get what he could, whilst the buyers would give as little as possible and this latter would be largely go- j verned by the ignorance and necessity of the vendor. Public markets are the safeguard of the producer and fix prices from day to day or week to week, as their transactions are quoted in the commercial columns of the daily and weekly newspaper press, which are the guardians of the producers' interests. Many farmers even in thia district would like to sell their sheep and cattle at home at market rates, so as to sare payment of auctioneers, charges, but they would be very sorry to see Messrs I\ ! Jackson and Oo.'s and other firms i stock sales throughout the district discontinued, as they know full well that if they were, prices would be disorganised and business seriously hampered. We mention this latter subject merely to show our readers the value of Mr Patterson's opinions and statements upon a subject they were quite as competent as he to form a correct judgment upon, and to suggest to our Prohibition friends that if one of the chief benefits of the system m Kansas is to drive people out of that State to spend their savings it does not say much for the increased social enjoyment to be found in that teetotal paradise, where liquor haa to be bought on a medical certificate obtained by perjury in nine cases out of ten.

It it not oxpfoted that Paliumont will close before Friday noxfc.

A lady surgeon-dentist has taken up her quarters ia GKsborne.

Gaa-coDsumors aro reminded that Monday next ii the last discount day.

The oyolos made by nineteen different firms are now being told in New Zoa'and.

Tha hot fly is proving tioublesomo to horses in the DunsUn distriot, Otago,

FiFty-ciftht married men are employed on the Kelburne Park rslief worki, Wellington.

Nominations for tho diforent events at tho Otaki Maori BO Moeting clobo on Monday next.

Fifty thousand tomato plants are being grown this year on tho wood side of the Maitaißiver, Nolion.

Mr A Martin, of Wanganui, has beeu awarded first prize and medal at ths Palmerston Korlh Exhibition for photographs.

A statoment has boon made that some Canterbury butter sellers make a half-hund-red weight of butUr into sixty-two "pound " packages !

The Supreme Court sessions tvoro brough to a dose in Wanganui at 12.20 this morning. His Honor tho Cbief Justice left by tho midday train to.day for Wellington.

Services at Cnstlooliff will be conducted to-morrow morning and evening, at 11 a.m. by Mr R Tucker and at 7 p.m. by Mr 1 Aitken, B.A.

iho Afaxwolltown concert is postponed until Thuroday, Ootober 27th, in order not to clash with Mr J Beck's, as tho members of Mr Bird's orohestra aro performing ia each.

Mr W Bodwell, secretary of the local Bowling Olub, hna raotivod on invitation from the Haw era Oiub, who open their sonson on Friday nut, the 16th instant, desiring the attendauoo of as many local bowlers as can make it convenient to attend.

In connection with the Wesleyan Home Minions, a mooting will be hold in the Trinity sohoolroom on Tuesday next at 7.30 p.m., when addretses will be delivered by tho Eovs T Or Hammond, « Patoa J Thomas, of Morton, and others. A oirailnr meeting will be hold in the Aramobo Wes> loyan Church on Wodnetday evtming. Cotlections will be taken up on bofcmlf of tho missions to the settlers in tho out districts and the Maoris.

Borne idea of the extent to wliioh raoo consultations are c&tromeed by Mew Zealanders may be gathered from the fact that on Monday lait money orders for a total of about £400 were issued by the postal officials in Wellington for the purohaso of tiokets in Tattorsull'* sweep on the Melbourao Cup, In addition to mor^cy orders a large number of oheques,\ postal notes, and bank drafts were «ont away to Hobart by Wellington residents anxious to scours a ohanco in the sweep.

An important sale of Japanese goods is to held on Thursday, 16th October, oommencin^ at 1 o'olook, by Mr J H Keesing, under instructions from Mr 1 Tat lee, The goods are at present on view in the shop, corner of G-uyton-street and Victoria Avenue, and comprise a magnificent assortment, which have been imported direct. Included in the stook are beautiful tea seta, orookery, glass, and fanoy ware, tablet, trays, braokoti, whatnots, umbrellas, and fancy linos innumerable. There will also be submitted a splendid collection of silk handkerchiefs, and otber artiolos manufactured from lilk, on also 12 oases of preserved ginger. If the whole are not oletred on Thursday, th« ~sale will be resumed on Friday.

iSx H. 8. Smythe, whs has arrived from AdeUido, after winding up the Bey. Ohas. Olark's tour, informs us (Melbourne Argus) that the circumstances attending the death of Miss Olivia Clemens, oldest dauthter of Mr S. L. Olemens (Mark Twain), wars exceedingly distressing. When the party arrived in England from the Cape, a house wai rented in (Juildford, in Surrey, and Mrs Olomons arranged for her other two daughters to oomo from Now York and stay in England while her husband was writing ft book about his tour round the world. On tho day when the young Indies were to sail, a cablsgram announoingan unavoidable postponement was reosived. Fearing that illness was the otuse, Mrs Olemens and her seoond daughter jailed on 16th Augmfc for New York. Oa 17tb Augmt Mr Clemens receired a cablegram that his daughter was dead.

The pnhlio of Marton and surrounding dJstriots will learn with rsgret-that, owing tp» the late fire which dostroyod the plant and premises of the Heronry the proprietor of that journal has baon cotnpslled to diaI continue its publication. Id* Mr Kirov's oapablo hands, it bade fair to win a high place in the ranks of Libsrai- journalism, I and its sudden and regrottablo demise i» a serious loss to the Liberal patty in and around Mwton, who are now left without an organ on the eve of a general election, i Surely they could have managed to avoid 1 shod a thing, by conferring with Mr Kirby and assisting him to tide ovor the difficulties ! which bsest him in oonßoquonce of the Gra which swept away the Mercury offios and its valuable contents. In hio valedictory notice this morning Mr liirby says -.— Thia morning the Moroury appoaro for tho last time. Just v it was beginning to thino above the horizon, an evil fate doomed it to extinction, and now its light will bssean no more. Tho proprietor finds it impossible to carry on the papor any longer with justice to bimselC and his stuff, and there is no alternative left for the paper but to expire. The circumstances which hare lod to this unexpected termination of what promised to be a brilliant career, are fresh in the minds of all our renders, and in the midst of our regrets we look bask with pride and pleasure to the Meronry'u record. It has purveyed the latest news, it has been steadily impartial towards all parties, and it has nover abated its contemporaries. Tho loss caused by the recent fire boj been of a most serious character, mostly through the interruption of a business whioh showed every proipeotof boinghighlJ-rbmuneratiTe. We have always held on to tho course of impartiality and independence, but the time has arrived when tho unequal struggle against; Sate can be no longer maintained. The sympathy o£ our contemporaries as well ] »s of the fait increasing numbor of our readers, has been freely exhibited, but the circumstances of the case nte go pressing that we oannot longer carry the flag on towards viotory. The elevation of the paper has been to u» a ' labour of love,' and wo were till a fortnight ago full of hope and expectancy. It was not to be. Fats was against usj tha Merouty i» now no more. The only oomolation wo have is that the paper has met with the cordial approval oE the public and the appreciation of all, and it is with deep regrat that we now lay farewell to our Marton and Sangitikei leaden. With this mere unomboilijhed itatomont we bid them good-bye,

*#* On our fourth page will bo found Parliamentary, Banking Committee and Mining news, together with a report of the annual meeting of tha Union Boat Club j aleo an interesting tale entitled "Candid Catherine."

'The Maauwai will Jeava Beit's Wharf at 2.80 to-morrow on an up river excursion.

Bathing season has oommenced early this year, A number of youths were indulging in a cold bath near the reclaimed land this morning.

Whitebait is very plentiful in the river just now, and during tho week some large catches have been made, one gentleman the other day obtaining no less than a bucket and a half full of the delicious morsels.

We give a final reminder of the fourth of the series of free entertainments in the Oddfellows' Hall this evening, commencing at 8 o'o'ock. We understand that an attractive programme has been prepared.

A chess match by telegraph baa boon arranged between the Btaunton Olub and New Plymouth. Play will commence at 8 o'clock this evening. A lady will play at No. 1 Board for New Plymouth againit Dr Hatherly.

A sample shipment of 10,000 bricks, made 3t Hurstville, N.S.W., has been sent to Capetown, South Africa, and it in expeoted that i£ they give satisfaction Sydney makers will probably receive orders for bricks running into millions.

All those interested in advanoing the work of the Temperance cause are invited in the Wesleyan Bunday Sohool on Monday next at 7.80 p,m, when papers will be read and discussions made on varrious points of tha movement.

Mr Qedrgeßeer Jewell, architect, invites, tenders (up till the 17th instant) for the ereotion of two villa residences with stables, coßoh houses, etc, at Dorietown. Plans end specifications may be seen at this office,

The Lily Bank Estate on the Brunswiok, containing 400 acrei, the property of tbe late Mrs John P Watt, wai submitted to auotion to-day by Mr F B Jabksoo, and knooked down to Mr John Wilkie, at £18 10s per aore, Mr T W Fisher acted on Mr VTilkie'a behalf.

At the Magistrate's Court this morning, before Mr 0 C Kettle, 8.M., three youths— A W Marshall, A Wilson, and A Keid— charged with stealing about 121bs of apples, valued at 3i, the property of Angus MoIntash, of Upokongaro. Iho accused pleaded guilty, aud the Magistrate adjourned tha case till Tuesday at 10 a.m, ia order that the Probation Officer might re. port as to their character.

This morning w« had tho pleasure of poruoin 7 the Wolliogteu edition of Eyolopedia of Now Zealand. The work promises to bo a most interesting and descriptive history of the progress of our colony. It is proFucely illustrated with views of interest and contains pictures of former governors and men of DOto, with biographies, publio buildings, and sketches of the men who have helprd to build up Wellington to its present state. The representative of the Cyclopedia Company is at present in Wanganui gathoricg information for insertion in the work.

With reference to the telegram appealing on oar fourth pago of the confirmation by cable from London of the snls of tho Waitekauri Goldon load, Mr Frnest Mantfiold supplies ub with tho followine particulars of salo : The Home purohaters to form a company with a oupital of £100,C00, out of which the Now Zonland vendors are to receive £25,000 in cash and aharop, and the London company to provido £25,000 of working oapital for the mine. Mr Mansfield formed a syndicate laac roar to partly purchase and provide tho money to develop the Goldon Lead property, and the shareholders now will receive a very handsome roturn for their invottmont, amounting to £1663, oasb and snares, for £100 invested. The purchasers are the Waitekeuri United Gold Mining Company, whose shares at present are very valuable; and the Golden Load shareholders, it is said, will rank with the Waitekauri United people, There aro several large shareholder* along the ooast, and Mr Mansfield holds a considerable interest in tha property. We congratulate all concerned on their good fortune.

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Bibliographic details

Wanganui Herald. [PUBLISHED DAILY.] SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1896. INTERESTING STATEMENTS., Wanganui Herald, Volume XXX, Issue 8979, 10 October 1896

Word Count
2,415

Wanganui Herald. [PUBLISHED DAILY.] SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1896. INTERESTING STATEMENTS. Wanganui Herald, Volume XXX, Issue 8979, 10 October 1896

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