Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Wanganui Herald. [PUBLISHED DAILY] TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 1891. LYNCH LAW.

Them must be something radically unsound, not to say rotten, in both j the political and social conditions in I the United Slates, to in any way warrant such an interference with the laws of the land, as the lynching of the murderers of tho Chief of Police at New Orleans. The lattor deed was ordered by a secret society, composed mostly of Sicilians, who were, we are told, mostly outlaws from their own country when a price was set upon their heads. The Mafia, as this secret society is called, was at first merely a political organisation, with signs, symbols, and pass words to enable its members to,, recognise each other and to keep 1 its secrets. Composed as it was of late years of a large percentage of outlawed Sicilian criminals, it is not to bo wondered at that its political mission was soon lost sight of, and that it became a shelter for desperate criminals and a nursery for assassins and others who prey upon their peaceful neighbors. The Chief of Police at New Orleans, where the society was very strong, had set himself the task of breaking it up and scattering its members, and was making matters generally very uncomfortable for the Mafia brotherhood, who found to their dismay that their seci'ets were known to the Chief of Police, and themselves kept under strict surveillance. There was but one thing for it, in the opinion of these desperadoes — the Chief of Police at New Orleans must die, and that suddenly. The edict was swiftly carried into effect, and the assassination accomplished. The assassins, however, did not escape detection, as the police were sufficiently informed of tho secrets of the brotherhood to promptly arrest certain of them, against whom they produced enough evidence to hang every man of them. The Society, however, was too well off to neglect the prevalent practice in the United States of making "the almighty dollar " intercede for the life and liberty of anyone who can afford to pay handsomely for the privilege of living outside a gaol who ought to be under lock and key. The detective who had the case in hand, and who knew the secrets of the brotherhood, was bribed and the jury who tried the ntardorers of his chief were also bribed so effectually that a verdict of •' not guilty " was returned in the teeth of the strongest evidence to the contrary. This was too much for the citizens of New Orleans, who, it may be remarked, have always been a very impulsivo people and prone to draw their weapons upon very slight provocation. These impulsive citizens, led by men of undoubted respectability, met hurriedly and determined that bribery and perjury should not shield murder even in New Orleans, & they did what the vigilant committee did nearly forty years ago in San Francisco, viz., broke open the gaol and lynched the prisoners, as a warning to all whom it might concern. There was this difference between the San Francisco and the New Orleans lynchings ; in the former there was no reason to expect that the criminals would escape as at New Orleans; but the vigilants were eager to show the horde of criminals, who had passed through the Q-olden Gate, or across the then trackless Wild "West country into California, that they must expect swift and terrible punishment when caught. It was to accentuate this that the vigilants broke open the prison doors at San Francisco, which were stoutly defended by the Governor of the Gaol and his warders, until the vigilants trained a couple of ship's

carronadea on the doors of the prison, and threatened to bombard the occupants of the building if they did not at once admit them. There was no resisting this request, backed up as it was by artillery, so the vigilants were admitted, and soon reappeared, dragging four or five trembling wretches, whose palid faces and fear, palsied limbs bore witness to I their agony of fright, The prisoners were taken to the rooms of the Vigilant Committee and tried, with a celerity uriknown in our courts of justice. They were found guilty, and given half an hour to pray or settle their worldly affairs ; at tho end of that time they wero dangling over the footpath at the end of poles thrust out of the upstairs windows of the Vigilant Committee Eooms. It was a rude application of the powers of law and order, but it was effective, for the nightly robberies and stabbings almost ceased, and a largo number of well-known criminals either turned their attention to honest labour, or betook themselves to some other scene of action where Judge Lynch was not on the Bench. Illegal as these lynehings no doubt are, they aro not without their use in a country like America, and it is quite evident the New Orleans ciiso demanded heroic treatinont— and got it. Tho international difficulty between Italy and the United States is an awkward one enough, but it will not lead to war, as the Italian Government daro not attack so powerful a nation on so flimsy a pretext, nor subject one million of its own people to the risk of expulsion from the States, if war between the two countries arose out of this New Orleans lynching of a few hardened assassins, who were undoubtedly guilty of murder and deserving of punishment. The method of that punishment is no excuse for war, and Italy will hardly be rash enough to make it one, as she would have no sympathy in such a struggle, and very little chance of escaping a disastrous defeat.

The election for tho vacant seat of Whitehaven, in tho House of Commons, saused by tho doath of the Bight Hon Oh IT. A. Cavendish Bentinck, resulted in a victory for Sir Jas. Bain who defeated Mr Henry Gordon, tho Homo Rulo nominee, by a majority of 203. At Thurles, in Tipperary, a party ot Parnellities attacked a procession composed of anti-Parnollites which was on its way to Archbishop Croke. A sharp ight ensued, both sides making uso of sticks and stones, and many participants wero injured, especially about tho head. Parnoll declares that he himself has always boon opposed to tho Plan of Campaign, and states that in 1887 Gladstono aßked tho Parnollite Party to suppresi tho Plan, as it was ruining tho Libertl causo. The appointment of Canon Barlow to tho Bishopric of Northorn Queensland has beon oonfirmod. By the explosion of gunpowder at a magazine, St. Peter's Church received considerable damage, and is now closed. His Holiness the Pope was celebrating Mass at tho time, and the concussion caused him ,to fall backwards, receiving a severe shaking. Tho French Ambasiador was injured by falling glass. Many windows of priceless valuo in the Vatican and St. Peter's Church were shattered to pieces. Tho evidence adduced at the trial of Verney as to his identity with tho Mr Wilson, Banker, for whom the woman Roullier procured Miss Baskott, is overwhelming.

Tho newly-electod Liconsing Committee mot at noon to-day at the Courthouse, when Mr W. G. Bassett was unanimouily elected chairman.

In another column, Mr Peter D. Hogg returns sincere thanks to the ratepayers for the proud position they placed him in at the Borough Council election yesterday.

Mr Fitzgibbon, for thirty-five years Town Clerk of Melbourne, has been appointed Chairman of tho Metropolitan Board of Works.

Messrs Notman and Cattell representing the Wanganui Underwriters' Association, left by train this afternnon for Patoa to fix a special rato for Mr Oldham's freezing and preserving works.

Nominations for tho Wanganui Jockey Club Two-year-old Stakes (to be run in March) and the Wanganui Derby, 1892 (to bo run in November) clobo at 9 p.m. this evening with the secretary, F. R. Jackson.

Tho annual meeting of the Wanganui Bible Auxiliary will be hold this evening in the Trinity Schoolroom, at 7.30. Tho Rev. H. T. Robiobns, Agent of the Homo Society, will address the meeting, and a large attendance iB desired.

A quiet wedding took place at St. John's Church, Wellington, on Saturday last. Miss Isabella Duthie, second daughter of Mr John Duthio, M.H.R., was married to Mr Thomas T. Millar, accountant in the Wollington Branch of the Bank of Australasia.

The weekly dance conducted by tho Misses Lockett bidn fair to bo one of the most successful assemblies of tho present winter. The attendance is growing more numerous every Tuesday evening ; and as tho Saturday olass for children is a most popular one, a very prosperous term is evidontly in store for the young lady instructresses. The usual dance takes place at the Institute to-night. A letter has been received in Auckland from Sir Thomas Esmondo, dated 25th February, stating that tho Irish party propose to send a new embassy to Australasia to colleot funds for the Irish evicted tenants. He says they are sorry to ask again after the magnificent generosity shown in rosponso to their previous appeal, but the position of the evicted tenants is desperate, and if they cannot bo maintained until the general election, all their sacrifice will go for nothing.

We understand that Mr Bonnie who skipped the Scotch rink that opposed Mr Downes' English team in the bowling match on Saturday last, and which was defeated by a large majority, has selectoda fresh team of his countrymon and challenged the victors to a return match on Saturday next. Play will start at two sharp, and as tho Scotch team comprises two leading skips the contest should be a clo Be one. Following are tho players : —English— Cattell, Moult, Purnell, and Downes (skip). Scotch — McLaren, Tawso, Ross, and Bennie (slip).

Mrs N. Spriggens has taken those large and centrally- situated premises in St. Hillstrcet, lately occupiod by Mrs Osborne, between Taupo Quay and Ridgway-streets, and iB having the place thoroughly renovated and furnished for the accommodation of boarders. The numerous bed-rooms, sittingrooms, etc., are lofty and well-airod, and those desirous of having a quiet and comfortable home in close proximity to the busiest part of the town could not do bettorthan communicate with Mrs Spriggons either personally or by letter.

At the monthly meeting of the Oamaru Harbour Board it was stated that the Railway Commissioners were deliberately boycotting the part by nofc providing trucks for imported c»rgo. The Hauroto should have arrived yesterday, but could not come as n» trucks were available. Ihe treasury telegraphed that they had collected £377 of the Board's railway earnings, and asking if they should pay the amount to the General Post Office towards overdue interest. The Chairman said he had written that the Board would not sanction such a proceeding but the money had still not arrived. It was resolved to telegraph to the Treasury, and if the money does not amis to-day a special meeting is to be held to consider the matter.

Dr Hoßkinga (of Masterton) was thrown trom hip gig on Monday and guetained a Fracture of his collar-bone.

Those members of the Naval Artillery taking part in the forthcoming entertainment mustor in plain clothes at 7.30 tonight.

In connection with the College entertainment to-morrow evening, tho Orohestral Club meet in tho Oddfellows' Hall afc 8 o'clock to rjight, for tho rehearsal of the selections to bo given by them.

It is understood that the Commission at present making inquiries at Wellington into the administration of the Public Trust Oflico have made a discovery of a somewhat sensational character. Mr Humphries, Commissioner of Grown Lands at Auckland, is to go to Napier instead of to Invercurgill, as at first intendod, and Mr Q. W. Williams, the Napier Commissioner, 1b to go to the Southern district

The 25th number of tho Wanganui Collegian is just to hand, tho interesting publication boing as usual brimful of information of a most readable, instructive, and entertaining character.

A meeting of the Wanganui Agricultural and Pastoral Association id to be held at 2.30 to-morrow afternoon at Mr F.B. Jackson's oflico to consider a letter from the Hon the Colonial Secretary re tho advisability of licensing stallions.

The insurances on Moir's mill at Southbrook (Christchurch), are as folio wb:— On the building, £500 in the Union (half reinsured). ±300 in the Now Zealand ; on the grain and produce, £2000 in the New Zealand. The loss of the Now Zealand oflice ib reducod to about £1000 by re-in-surances.

There was a great deal of oxoitomont afc Oamaru over the election of a Licensing Committee The Moderate Party put forward five candidates and tho Prohibitionists five. The Prohibitionists were elected on the understanding that they renew all tho licenses in the town for one year and thereafter no licenses be granted.

When the Premier and Minister for Lands were in Masterton a deputation of members of the Knights of Labour was introduced by Mr A. W. Hogg, M.H.R., and asked for land for special settlement purposes, and for amendments in the regulations' The Ministers promised to givo the requests their fullest consideration.

Weights are published elsewhere for the Steeplechase, Flying, and Winter Oats Handicaps in connection with the Wanganui J.C.s (Jueon's Birthday Meeting ; acceptances at 9 p.m. on 12th May, when nominations will bo received for tho Huntere' Steeplechase, Trial Steeplechase, Hack Flat Handicap and Final Handicap Steepleohaso (1 iov. each.) The Hon. the Minister for Mines, Public Works, and Defence, loft Wellington for Auckland, via New Plymouth this morning. Mr Seddon oxpects to be absent about three weeks, and will be accompanied by Mr Gordon, Inspecting Engineer of the Minos Department, and wili visit tho defence works at tho North Shoro, the Coromandel goldflelcls, To Aroha, the Thames and tho Puhipuln Bilver mines. The Minister purposos visiting tho Otago goldfields prior to the opening of Parilameat. One of the latest spocimens of ingenuity calculated to interest the youthful mind for some time is what is called " The Square Puzzlo," consisting of ten pieces of cardboard, forming five squares. The four iquaros put together will make a perfectly square tablet (4x4 inches), and the puzzle is fo absorb the fifth square and still retain a perfeot squaro. It is needless to say that the puzzlo is a perfectly " square " one, and further information concerning it may be obtained from Messrs H. I. Jones and Son. There are 497 legal praetioners in Now Zoaland to a total of 661,136 population. This gives one solicitor to every 1338 of tho population, or 1 to every 268 of the male adults. If the nett average earnings of these gentlemen be taken at £400 a year each, it will be seen that Ihe people of tho colony contribute £198,800 every year towards the support of theso legal practioners, and fully half as much more towards that of their clerks and other employes. Tho full programme of tho breaking-up ontertainment of the Collogiate School tomorrow evening is published in another column and reforonce thereto will show that both care and discernment have been shown in its compilation, each and ev«ry item being of a high-class cbaraoter. The Orchestral Society contribute instrumental selections, thon there are a numbor of vocal items, a recitation, cornet solo, squad drill, and Indian Club swinging, the performance concluding with Sheridan's play, "St. Patrick's t)ay,or tho Scheming Lieutenant." Tho price of admission has been fixed at 2s 6d, and it is confidently oxpected there will bo a brilliant assemblage at the Oddfellows' Hall to-morrow evening. Mr A. D. Willis, so favourably known over Now Zealand for his oiccllenfc lithographic work, is determined to keep pace with the times, and has arranged with Mr D. Ross for the lease of his extensivo premises for a long term of years. As Mr' Willis's business has quite outgrown his own, he will transfer his shop, and will also havo his lithograph, letterpress, and bookbinding departments under the same roof. He is also arranging to import from London one of the latest lithographic machines of large size, which will be equal to any machine of the land in tho colony, besides which he is also adding new driving and other maehinory suitable for tho purposes required. When all amngementi are completed, he will require additional hands in addition to the large number he now emoloys. It is satisfactory to find Mr Willis has such confidence in the future of this district, and we wish him tho success

his enterprise deserves.

Owing, no doubt, to the fact that a largo numbor of householders were awaiting the result of the poll for the Borough Council election, there was not ft very large attondance at tho Infants' Schoolroom last evening, the business being to receive the annual report and balance-sheet, and these having boon read were put to tho mooting by tho chairman (Roy. J. Treadwell), and adopted. Aftor votes of thanks had been nccorded tho outgoing Committee, the meeting procoeded to the olection of the new School Committee, with the following result :— Spurdle, 29 ; Bassefct, 26 ; Boucher, 26; McFarlane, 26; Peter Bell, 25; W. Russell, 24 ; Rev. J. Treadwell, 22 ; and Collins, 14. The first seven are accordingly elected. On the motion of Mr Bassett, seconded by Mr Spurdle, it was resolved That it be a recommendation to the incoming Committee, that attention be given to ths physical training of the children (boys and girls) attending the local State Schools. It was further decided that the annual meeting be held in tho Infant School; also, on the motion of Mr Bassett, that in the opinion of the meeting the present system of nominating the School Committee is a very unsatisfactory one, and that the Chairman bring the matter boforo the Education Board, if they consider it advisable to take action in the matter. The meeting closed with a hearty vote of thanks to the chair. The new Committee met afterwards, and elected Mr F. Spurdle

chairman.

The public to-day seem completely bewildered at the results of yesterday's polling, as given in another column. That Mr F. R. Jackson should head the poll did not create surprise, as he had served the burgesses well on previous occasions and is a general favorite; but that a new aspirant for municipal honours shoHld beat men who had served many yeara at the Council table and in the Mayoral ohair was a genuino surprise. Mr P. D. Hogg is a very popular young business man and lias a large circle of friendß who polled in his favour and placed him in the prourl position of socond on the list, only five votes separating him from the top number. That Mr Hogg will prove himself worthy of this confidence we make no doubt and congratulate him on Ills success. We are sorry to see Mr Lifßton's name below the line of successful candidates, as he has a thorough knowledge of the municipal laws, and has been a sturdy watoh dog, so to speak. Mr Oliver too deservedbetteratthe hands of the burgesses, having served them well for the time he has had a seat at the Council table. Mr Lloyd Jones would have been far higher np had he been better known to the ratepayers, tho bulk of whom he is not acquainted with, owing to his having for some years past resided at Marton where he filled the office of Mayor for two terms before returning to reside again in Wanganui, The ratepayers of St. Johns' Word were skil^ fully canvassed on behalf of the local candidates, whose supporters were afraid of the result, until the local cry was raised in their favour. The new Council is undoubtedly a good one ; indeed it would have been impossible to have elected a bad one out of the 13 candidate} ,

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WH18910428.2.4

Bibliographic details

Wanganui Herald. [PUBLISHED DAILY] TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 1891. LYNCH LAW., Wanganui Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 7399, 28 April 1891

Word Count
3,292

Wanganui Herald. [PUBLISHED DAILY] TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 1891. LYNCH LAW. Wanganui Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 7399, 28 April 1891

Working