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Wangauni Herald. (PUBLISHED DAILY.) TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1887. THE TOTALISATOR.

There cannot be two opinions on tbe present abuse of the above mechanical aid to betting. From one end of New Zealand to tho other, mushroom racing clubs have sprung up, and are fattening upon the profits derived from "the machine." The amount of time devoted to attending these meetings means a serious loss of profitable labour, and the immense sums of money frittered away at them cannot but be prejudicial to thb best interests of the colony. The thing has grown by "leaps and bounds" into an intolerable evil, and one which the legislature should not lose a single moment in rectifying. The metropolitan clubs conduct racing on proper lines, and sternly repress swindling. In their hands the totalisator is safe from abuse, but it is not co guarded at the gate-money meetings, which are now held almost weekly in some part of the colony, and where gross frauds on the public are openly practised. People of the most enthusiastic sporting proclivities are crying out against the immense increase of racing in the colony, and are openly predicting the early repeal of the law under which the use of tho totalisator is permitted in New Zealand. It therefore behoves the metropolitan racing clubs to take this matter in hand and try and devise measures by which the use of the totalisator may be secured to them, and an immediate stopputtothe abuse of itat gate-money meetings. If the legislature insisted that only those clubs which gave £500 and upwards in stakes for each day's racing held by them, should be permitted the use of the totalisator at their meetings, the evil would be effectually mitigated, and the absurd number of small raco meetings, with which the colony is now deluged, curtailed within proper limits. By the aid of the revenue derived from the machines the Metropolitan Clubs have been enabled to improve their grounds, buildings, and other permanent conveniences, and have increased the stakes so much that it does not pay an owner to run "a bye " for an important race. At the small meetings where the stakes are seldom over fifty or a hundred pounds and where the public invest many hundreds on each race through the agency of the totalvsator the matter is very different, and owners are not wanting who start their horses merely as decoys for the public, who pile their money on to the best horse only to see it run an inexplicable losing race, whilst some second rater on •whom the knowing few have invested scoops the pool. These nefarious dodges dare not bo attempted at the large meetings, where there are stewards who have the courage of their opinions, but they are of every day occurrence at the small meetings where there is no such safeguard . In any cose the number of race meetings is out of all reason, and the sooner there is a stop put to the bulk of them the better for all, as they are sapping the very vitals of the colony and drawing the people away from their daily avocations to an extent which cannot but react injuriously upon the whole community. The Wanganui Jockey Club fully recognises tbe extent of tho evil, and is about addressing a circular to the other Metropolitan Clubs drawing their attention to the gigantic strides it is making and the danger impending therefrom. If the Metropolitan Clubs do their duty fearlessly and thoroughly, they havo the power in their own hands to speedily mitigate this growing evil, as they can enact and enforce rules making the small gatemoney meetings unpopular with owners, who would have to elect between the legitimate racing club of the district and the host of mushroom bodies now advertising race meetings throughout the colony. There is no j necessity for these small meetings; they do not promote sport, nor do anything towards improving the breed of horses. They are Bimply places whero hawks may pluck pigeons and rascality have an outing, therefore the sooner they arc done away with tho better.

The Hon Mr Ballapce is expected in Wanganui by train this afternoon en route for Auckland,

Messrs At D. T. Chubb and J. Bites have been appointed canvassers for tbe Regatta Association,

The remit of the poll for the Western Maori Di'trict is as follows :— Hoani Taipua 11258, Te Wheoro 519, Kaihu 225, Taiwhangi 148, Tanrua 70. The poll will be declared cv the 20th.

To-morrow evening tho Tuhua will run on a moonlight excursion to the Heads Excursions would have been run cooner but for oertain alterations which are now being made to the recommendation of the Inspector of machinery. The trip is likely to be a pleasant one, and already thore aie numerous promises of support

Our Waitotara correspondent forwards ns the following account of a young native's experiences while lost iv the bush :—: — Several of the Tapatupu natives went out on Wednesday 29th December 1886, eel Gibing on the Ngautnor* stream away on the Crown lands behind the Hummocks, amongst them a lad named Tehure about 7 years of age, a son of the renowned Hiroki, who was hanged at New Plymouth' 1 some years back for the murder of McLean, the surveyor, at Motnahaki. Several parties were out looking for him [until about Thurtday last the 6th January —when they came to the coonolusion that ho must be dead ; bat on Sunday Mr F, Williamson and Mr Death, while away looking for some cattle found him. Mr Williamion on reaching the whare found that some of the sugar he shonld have h*A in the whare there had been taken away. On going outside to look round they found the missing lad amongst some thistles. They got him to go to Waitaranui with them, and after. wards took turn to Papatupei, tho natives being completely o»€r-awed at the appearance of tho youngster again. Ho says he got nothing but berries in fch« bush until making Mr Williuneon's wjbirf about Friday last.

We hear that Mr G. Caiman is making arrangements for the purchase of Mr A. Mnnro'f grocery business, the latter having' decided on commencing buiineis in Welllngtom

The Wanganui Burns' Club are to hold a convivial meeting on the 25th, tho anniversary of the birthday of the national poet, and to arrange matters, a meeting will be held in the Anchor Hotel on tbe 13th inst.

In giving some City Rifles soores yester. day we, by accident stated that the bnll'ieye used on the Cft x 4ft target was 12 inohes square— it should have been 12 inches in diameter.

Last night aoting-Captains Jones (Wanganni Rifles) snd|Hamerton (Patea Rifles) went through the practioal portion of their examination having a few file of the Wanganui Rifles for the purpose. LieutenantColonels Stapp and Noake acted as examiners.

Word was rpceived in town this morning thtt Mr Whitten's store at Manutabi had been burned down last night' No paTtisulars of the accident are yet to hand.

At St Mary's Church this morning Miss Cronin, a prominent member of the choir, was married to Mr P, Labatt. There was a large congregation present to witness the interesting event, and on tbe ceremony being concluded the "Wedding March 1 ■A-as played on the organ, and therx amid showers of rice and the congratulations of a large number of friends the hippy couple left the church.

By the Charlet Edward, Mr W. Bone, who has been for some yein past connected with the railway department in Wanganui, leaves for Nelson, where be will take a higher po«t in connection with the management of the wharves. During his itty hera Mr Bone has made himself popular with all with whom he has come in contact, and we are gltd to hear that in leaving Wanganui he is doing to with benefit to himself.

The committee of the Wanganui Jockey Club held their utual monthly meeting last nik;ht. Attention waa drawn to tho great increass of small gate money race meetings, and it wai decided that the club thould send a circular letter to tbe rest of the Metropolitan Clubs drawing attention to the evil and suggesting means for its Immediate abatement. The committee decided that the race meeting at Willow B»nk, Lower Rangitikel, on the 18th December baying been an unauthorised affair, all hcraes which competed there should be declared disqualified for competition at all meetings over which the W.J.C. held authority. It was decided to call for tenders for repairs and additions to tho grand stand and other buildings belonging to the Club. We would suggest that the sptcc between the end of the stewards' stand and the judge's box should bo devoted to a prets box from which reporters might view and report the racing.

The Heads Railway directors held their ordinary meeting yestesday. The returns produced for tho last five weoks showed receipts amounting to £180, which the direotors considered very satisfactory! It was decided that moonlight excursions should be held one night this week (Wed nesday) and that several should be held next month. The time-table was altered to the extent of putting oa an additional train at noon from town, and one leaving the Heads every night at 7.30. Mr Fitzherbert waited on tho directors relative to certain legal matters affecting the Balgownie estate sidings, and the matter was left in the hands of Mr Borlase to arrange. Respecting the carriage ordered from the Government workshops, the secretary was instructed to write to Mr Beattie asking when it would be completed. Other business of a detail character was transacted, and the meeting then adjourn°d. The London correspondent, of the Dunedin Star, writing on November 5, says .— "A lot of stories are afloat about the 1 colonial ' dinner given by 'Tinned-meat ' Tallcrman to the working men delegates of London, From all sides I hear that the colonial dishes proved the reverse of tempting. Of the (ight kinds of Csmdian fieh only one sort could bo any stretch of Imagination be considered eatable. The Queensland beef was l>ko leather — no nutriment in it, 'My Miams wouldn't put such ttufl afore me if we got it for now't,' said one working man to my informant, and similar views were expressed with 'regard to the ' tetters ' of New Zealand rabbit and the sodden-looking Victorian mutton Eventually the visitors, disappointed of the substantial meil they had expeoted, and excited by loaded beverages loosely described as colonial wine, grew derisive. Mr Tallcrman's glowing eulogy on colonial provisions was received with sarcastic laughter, and the speeches proceeded with difficulty. At last one man, merrier than the rest, commenced a fusilads of apples, oranges, and nuts at frieudj opposite. They rcturnod the compliment, and ' ructions ' prevailed till ' Tinned-meat ' Tallerman himself bustled round to the noisy ones, and, ordering the original disturber off home, partially resorted quiet. Most of the workmen, however, followed their friend, vowing they must get ' some'at to eit aforo the publics closed.' It has again and again bsen demonstrated that a most excellent dinner of colonial produce can be given in London if a little pains are taken. Tallerman has simply to think himself for his failure, He tried to do the entertainment on the oheap, and with the usual fatal results." Old and young at this season look for something ia the shtp'e of a gift or present, and we would imagine that a good portrait, nicely taken and neatly framed, would be 'the most appreciative gift anyone could with for. Visitors to Mr Kirkwood'a studio will be presented with a cabinetsize portrait of t themsclf, framed ready to hang up. Donbtlefs the groat rash of business will be dono at this itudio, as it is one of the best and most complete in the North Island. See show cases for speoimens.—Advt, The worst forms of Fever, Prickly Heat, smallpox, and Measles rapidly cured by Lamplough'a Pyretic Saline. "It saved my life, for the fever had obtained a strong hold of me."— C. Fitzgerald, correspondent of Manchester Guardian In Albania, Abundant medical testimony enclosed with each bottle. It is the cure for Cholera Mid Preventive of most diseases incident to Tropical and Colo-

vial lifet It allays thirst in a remirkable mtinner, and oools and vitalises the blood, J.S. Purdy, Esq., writes :— " I would rather go short of anything than this neverfailing traveller's friend. "—Advt

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Bibliographic details

Wangauni Herald. (PUBLISHED DAILY.) TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1887. THE TOTALISATOR., Wanganui Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 6117, 11 January 1887

Word Count
2,066

Wangauni Herald. (PUBLISHED DAILY.) TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1887. THE TOTALISATOR. Wanganui Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 6117, 11 January 1887

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