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Wanganui Herald. PUBLISHED DAILY. MONDAY, SEPT. 23, 1878.

The terrible murder recently committed at Waverley has caused intense excitement on the coast, the natives at Waitotara being particularly agitated. The unfortunate victim, one John McLean, was engaged as a cook for Messrs Frazer and Tregear's survey party on the Momahaki Block. A portion of this block, it will be remembered, has been get apart by the Government for sale in sections on deferred payments, and the surveyors were engaged in defining the boundaries of the lots. McLean was left at the camp while the remainder of the party were at work. On the return of Mr Fraser, the absence of the cook was noticed, and on a search being made the body of the man was discovered in a creek near at han'l. It was not at first thought that a murder had been committed, but on it being discovered that one of the tents had been robbed of bullets and powder, medical examination also found that one of the bullets had been shot into the man's body. The circumstances then pointed unmißtakeably to a murder. Those best able to form an opinion, at once thought the deed had been done by a native, and subsequent enquiries tend to support his theory. The Waitotara natives

state that one of the men living there has cleared out suddenly, and they think he is the guilty man. Who this man is, and where he came from, is ' explained in a letter we publish from Colonel McDonnell, whose extensive experience of the natives makes his opinion valuable. Certain it is that Hiroki has disappeared, and the natives point to him as the possible murderer. It would be idle to give this deed any political significance, although none the less does it require every effort on the part of the Government to trace out the murderer. A substantial reward, say £500, should be offered without delay. Jf the niurd- ■ erer has hastened away to the Waikato, this would be an excellent opportunity of testing the friendliness of the King party by demanding the delivery of Hiroki if he should seek refuge with them. The i*ecent cfise on the East Coast, in which the native, committee lent valuable assistance in bringing native offenders to justice, shews that the desire to abide by European laws does really exist, but it is still to be proved -whether the native zeal will be exercised as readily in bringing a Maori to justice for the murder of a European, as it Avas for the conviction of a native for tho murder of a native. The Waitotara natives deny all knowledge of the deed, and state that it is not a tiibal act, but is according to Col. McDonnell's letter tho " unauthorised act of a single person." As far as the circumstances have come to our knowledge, the murder cannot be removed from the category of ordinary crimes committed for revenge or gain, and therefore a substantial reward ought to bring about the capture of the suspected man.

Affairs Municipal will doubtless progress more smoothly and satisfactorily now, since it has been found desirable in one of the local churches to offer up prayers for the Corporation collectively and individually. The body corporate were quite likely in much need of a little assistance o£ the sort, but in our opinion some effort should have been made to get the Borough Councillors to go to Church and pray for themselves. We will carefully watch the] effects of this movement, and in the event of results proving as we anticipate and hepe, we will recommend the Harbour Board and County Council for a little of the same treatment.

In the Resident Magistrate's Court this morning, before R. W. Woou, Esq., R.M., James Smith was charged with drunkenness. Mr Woon after enquiring of the Police into the circumstances of the case and ascertaining that it was the prisoner's. first offence in the district, discharged him with a grave reprimand. There was no other business before the Court.

The Secretary of the Harbor Board announces that as the contractor for the reclain-, mation between the Bridge and the Market Place is about to commence operations, all articles at present deposited on the Foreshore included between those limits must be forthwith removed. We are requested to point to those concerned the necessity for immediate action on their part. The Foreshore is now lumbered with all kinds of properties which have never beeu an ornament to the River Bank and which we shall be very glad to see removed. The contractor may set to work at any time on this reclamation, and if these effects are not taken away within the time stated may possibly summarily dispose of them,

In the Odd Fellows Hall on Saturday night the Star Dramatic Company presented the old English two Act Drama " Dick Turpin "to a fair house; The interesting representation of some of the incidents in the life of the bold highwayman was very creditably placed before the audience, the principal characters, by Messrs Hooper, Clinton, and Howe, being supported with spirit and skill. The drama was well received, but the Burlesque "II Trovatore " which followed it; constituted the principal feature of the performance. This extravaganza was replete with songs and dances, in which Miss Bessie Vivian appeared to great advantage, and in two or three of the songs which she sings tunefully and with grace, she was enthusiastically encored. Miss Jenny Nye was also well received, and supported with her usual skill another of the principal characters of the Burlesque. To-night the Company will present their greatest performance in the preparations for which neither trouble nor expense had been spared. The pantomime itself has been well commended as amusing, and pleasing in high degree. It abounds wibh<music,dancing,and the usual amount of jokeshand fun. The scenery is what it is described to be, and on the whole we anticipate a successful week for " Ixion." We expect to see a full house at the opening performance to-night.

The Treasurer of the Palmersfcon Cemetery Fund has received a letter from Mr Laird, Nurseryman, of Wanganui, in which that gentleman generously offered — in case there waS room in the cemetery — to donate one hundred young cypresses for beautifying the reserve. Mr Linton, the treasurer, replied that there was plenty of room, and that if Mr Laird could recommend the present season for transplanting, nis generous offer would be accepted with thanks. In the event of the season being past, he would gratefully receive the donation at a future time. — Manawatu Times.

On Saturday next the proprietor of the Gymnasium in Campbell Place, assisted by a couple of professional athletes, and a number of members of the Gymnasium Glub, will give an entertainment in the Oddfellow's Hall-. The programme includes all sorts of acrobatic and athletic feats, besides the exhibition by time light of statuesque effects. This last item being a novelty in Wanganui, and likely to be carefully and well prepared, should prove, with, the rest of the entertainment, very attractive. The band has consented to lend its assistance, and as the promoter of this performance has ever been ready to give his services on any occasion where funds were required to be raised for Charitable or local purposes, we shall be glad to see his venture attended by a bumper house.

Tenders for the mail services are invited. At this end of the Provincial district the services are thus divided : — Marton and Tutaenui, twice weekly ; Marton and Crofton, thrice weekly ; Wanganni Post Office and Wharf, as required j Wangauui Post Office and Eailway Station,as required ; Wangaehu Post Office and Eailway Station, thrice weekly ; Marton Post office and Eailway Station, twice daily.

The following scale for the conveyance of potatoes came into force on the N. Z: Railways on the 17th inst : — In quantities of 5 tons and upwards, for distances up to 20 miles, to be carried at 2£d per ton per mile ; for distances from 20 miles to 60 miles, l£d per ton per mile ; and for distances over 50 miles, Id per ton per mile,

The following telegram appears in the Sydney Morning Herald of 13th inst:— "Melbourne — A letter was received yesterday from Boyle, the Victorian cricketer in England, stating that Mr I. D. Walker has relinquished the idea of bringing out his team of Gentlemen cricketers, in consequence of the superiority shown by the Australians. Mr Boyle, however, states that the I Zingari Club intend sending an eleven to the colonies."

Mr J. W. Jackson, with the horse " The Painter has arrived in Wellington and will leave by the Manawatu to-day. Both horse and owner in good health,

Mr Sutton thirsted for some information in ( the House as to how the multitude of John Smiths scattered over the Colony, could be distinguished from each other in making up the electoral rolls., whereat ) an honorable member from Canterbury promptly suggested 11 Ear mark 'em." Mr Kees said all the John Smiths in the colony, however numerous, would have to be placed on the roll if qualified, and as to distinguishing between them, it would be like the story of the man who called out in an American omnibus " Where's the colonel," which was the signal for eighteen gentlemen to rise up simultaneously, and exclaim "Here he is."— Wellington Chronicle.

News has been received by the Suez Mail that the Colonial Investment Company of New Zealand, capital half a million, has been successfully floated in Scotland. T. K. Ritchie, of the Colonial Bank of New Zealand, has been appointed general manager of the company for this Colony.

John Martin Eockel, of Masterton, journalist, has filed a declaration of insolvency.

' One day last week the following handsome additions were made to the Bishop's Ecsidence Fund by prominent Hebrew citizens of Wellington :— Mr Jacob Joseph 60 guineas ; Messrs Jacob Joseph' & Co., 10 guineas; Messrs P. Moeller & Co, 10 guineas.

MV Edward Greenway has been appointed agent for the Colonial Insurance Company for the Patea district.

The children of the Christ Church congregation and those attending the Sunday School are invited to the schoolroom this (Monday) evening to witness a magic lantern entertainment provided by Mr S. H. Drew. No admission fee will be charged. The doord will be opened at a quarter past seven, the entertainment to commence at half pa3t.

Major Charles Heaphy V.C. has been appointed a Judge of the Native Land Court.

For sometime past now New Zealand has suffered from a dearth of amusements. Carrying out tho truth of the proverb that it never rains but it pours, we are now to have an abundance of entertainments. At present Duuedin has the Vale Vos« aud Madame Cora Combination. Christohurch has tho Hoskins and Chaplin Combination, and tho Circus. For Wellington the Circus is billed, and Baker and Farron have arranged dates. The C.K.B. Minstrels are at Nelson, en route for Taranaki-aivj Auckland. At Napier the Marionettes fire shi>vring. At Auckland Baker and Farron are playing ; and Leon and Kelly, Miss Cbarbonette, the wminent pianist, and Barton's Circus arc expected, aud last but not least we have the " gorgeous midwinter pantomime" in full swing in Wanganui.

We notice in the Auckland papers the announcement of the arrival by the mail steamer from Sydney of the talented pianist, Mdlle. Charbonnet, a pupil of the Conservatoire de Musique, Paris. • This lady is a native of Cinciunati, U.S. America, and although under 20 years of age, she is aaid to outrival Madame Goddard. On this point the Sydney Catholio Times says :— -" She has, as every artiste know?, all the facility of execution and delicacy of touch for which Madame Arabella Goddard was renowned ; and she has more than her gifted predecessor, she has a soul — she loves music — she loves the piano — in fact she is a born musician. Art can make an executionist, but art cannot make a pianiste." From the opinions of the Press before us, we may expect a rich musical treat as we believe the lady will likely visit here in about a month. The Auckland Star says •< :— " She is mistress in every school ; the severe classic of Beethoven or Hummel, the romanesque of Chopiu, the poetry of Mendelssohn, the florid but harmonious musical pictures of Haydn or Weber, and the brilliant fanciful fligh^ of Franz Liszt, the abbe oE music and religion, are equally at her command." Mdlle. Charbonnet is accompanied by Miss FJoreuce Neville, a young soprano vocalist of Melbourne. Mr, H. Montagu who has acquired considerable reputation as a journalist and critic in Sydney is manager for the N.Z. tour.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WH18780923.2.8

Bibliographic details

Wanganui Herald, Wanganui Herald, Volume XII, Issue 7233, 23 September 1878

Word Count
2,106

Wanganui Herald. PUBLISHED DAILY. MONDAY, SEPT. 23, 1878. Wanganui Herald, Volume XII, Issue 7233, 23 September 1878

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