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LONDON,

(From our own Correspondent.)

May 4, 1876.

By tho death (by suicide) of Lord Ljttelton tho working men of the metropolis have lost a good friend. The late peer's name is inseparably identified with the educational- movements of the last decade, but it was in his capacity of president of the Working Mons Club and Institute Union that lie became connected with tho artizans of the Kingdom. Having attended tho meetings of tho Central Council as a delegate,! had tha opportunity of becoming acquainted with tho president's deep interest in all matters affecting the welfare of the vast number of Clubs forming theUpion. By personal attendance afc nearly all meetings, by his excellent advice, by his generosity in the mattor of prizes, and by his friendly advocacy in and out of Parliament, he won the esteem of one and all, and it was with unfeigned regret that the news of his melancholy fate was received.

As I before mentioned the wear«rs of the Light Blue scored an easy victory on the river, the race beinjj rowed in2omin. 19secs. Tke Oxonians were outpaced from the start, and fell to pieces after they had gone a mile, their style of rowing being likened to a peal of bells, one after another. The day being the finest we have had this year, |and the attendance being simply marvellous, any idea of computing the number present must be given up. The Inter-University Athletic sports produced some unprecedented results, and the Oxonians were amply revenged. Tho 100 yards race was won by Shearman, °o£ Oxford, in 10 seconds, while Nichols, hailing from the same 'Varsity, pulled off tho mile in 4 mm 27 1.5 seconds, a time that has never been equalled but by one amateur previously. The Three Mile Race was also won in oxcollcnt time, Goodwin, of Oxford winning easily in 15 mm 12 sec. Cambridge won the Quarter Mile race, the Hurdlo Eaco, and throwing tho Hammer, the winning throw in the last event being 138 ft. 3in. The jumping prizes fell easily to Oxford, Iheir president in the high jump clearing the marvellous height of 6ft> 2Jin., the best performed on record. The same athlete succeeded in winning the long jump, covering 31ft 8£ inches. Tho meeting altogether was most successful, no less a number than 48,000 being present.

The first grand three year old race of tho season was decided yesterday over the Rowley Mile on tho far-famed Neiv Market Course. The Two Thousand Guineas Stakes still retains its time honored name, although the value of the prize now more than doubles its original value. All through the winter, the winner of the Middle fPark Plate, that excellent trial race for the youngsters, held 4 the premier position in the betting, but about three weeks back it was reporied that a private spin had taken place and that "Petrarch," the favorite, had been beaten by ' Kaleidoscope,' another horse in the samo stable. The consequence is that Petrarch, was deposed from his pride of place at tho head of the betting, and his> whilom con. queror installed as first favorite. This position "he retained to the start, 5 to 2 against being hardly obtained whm the flag fell. Petrarch, the despised, found a few friends who quietly took all the hundreds to eight there were knocking around, although as much as 40 to 1 had been offered a few days before the race. The result proved tho reliability of public running over private treat, for Petrarch cantered in an easy winner by three lengths, the favorite being ridden out just scoring third place. Itis reported that Lord Dupplin, the owner of tho first and third horses is not a good winner, having backed the losing horse, but it is not always the owner that wins the money. Petrarch of course now takes first place iv the Derby quotations, and according to public form has the race at his mercy. A Board of Trade inquiry into tho loss of tho ship Strathmove was opened at the Greenwich Police Court on the 2nd iust. Hr Savenhill, on behalf: of the Board, stated that the points to be settled were — whether the captain and officers had done their duty ;second,whether tho boats were or were not jammed ; and thirdly, whether due care had been taken in storing the gunpowder on board. Ifc might also bo well to inquire whether the spirits should have beeu placed in so exposed a situation as to permit of the crow getting drunk twice previous to the catastrophe ;

had there been sufficient exertion made for the saving of life ; had tho captain been right in pushing on in a fog ; and, finally, whether the compasses were properly adjusted. The evidence taken so far relates to tho loading of the ship, and the adjustment of the compasses. The ship does not appear to have been swung after the cargo had been taken on board, which, consisting as ifc did of 411 tons of iron, must have unpaired the correctness of her swinging. The report of the Assessors will no doubt bo published.

The homo coming oi the Prince of Wales will bo celebrated by a grand demonstration of welcome in London. Tho city magnates hare had an entertainment committee hard at work for weeks past, and their programme limited to one day in consequence of the pressing engagements of the Prince, will consist of a reception, a banquet, for which 500 invitations have been issued, and a ball, to which 2000 are invited. The ball will be held in a temporary structure to bo erected in front of the Guildhall, similar in size to tho room erected when the Sultan of Turkey visited London, some years back. Preparations have already commenced and carpenters and upholsters have taken possession of the grand old building. The reception of the Prince by the people will, however, bo the sight, for as public feeling now runs he is the most popular man in the Kingdom. His wife and children will be the first to greet him, for it is intonded that the Princess should go out in ono of the Royal yachts to meet tho "Serapis " off Portsmouth.' Verily it will bo a gladsome day when he arrives all safe and sound. The visits paid by the Prince to Malta, Gibraltar, Madrid, and Lisbon havo also sorveel the purpose of breaking the sudden change of climate from India to England, and every one rejoices to hoar that our future King onjoys the best of health. At Madrid, hia reception by the Spaniards was exceedingly enthusiastic, and there, a* everywhere else, he won golden i opinions by his kindly genial manner.

A difficulty has just arisen between England and America which at present looks ugly. The extradition of a criminal named Winslow was demanded by America, and agreed to by England, provided a guarantee was given by America that Winslow would only be tried for that particular crime for which his extradition was demanded. America declines to give such guarantee, and England refuses to give up the criminal without it. According to the telegrams published this morning the American Cabinet have decided upon the abrogation of the treaty, so that England and America will soon become very havens of refuge for criminals lucky enough to escape from one side of the Atlantic to the other. As both Cabinets are equally firm, a fresh treaty becomes a necessity.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

LONDON,, Wanganui Herald, Volume X, Issue 2822, 3 July 1876

Word Count
1,243

LONDON, Wanganui Herald, Volume X, Issue 2822, 3 July 1876

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