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SPORTING NOTES.

[By Haweseye.]

Since the Wangamri meetings have taken place the good old English sport of racing has not occupied a great deal of public attention ; but nevertheless there has been some manifestation of interest in the events to be run to-morrow on the Aramaho course. In sporting circles still greater interest is visible, as of course would be expected. To those who have marked carefully the public attention to these events, it will be apparent that a very large number of the community of either sexes will not grace the course with their presence, although the sporting fraternity will doubtless muster strong. I might be somewhat mistaken in my prediction, but after watching tho outside interest in the meeting very closely, I have arrived at this conclusion, which I hope will only prove to be an erroneous \ one . At any rate the Anunoho annual meeting is not likely to have such a successful issue as was at first anticipated. Up till the night the entries were received I, amongst others, thought that Auckland Kate, Tommy Dodd, and other well known fencers who have distinguished themselves on the leading New Zealand turf, were to come here with tho intention of running to-morrow, but I have found that all along I have been deluded, and that there was no foundation whatever for such a report gaining currency. At tho time I was somewhat dubious whether Dan O'Brien and Campbell would bring their horses all the way from Canterbury for the sake of contesting in a £100 race, but the assurance of their appearance on the Aramoho course was so positive that I believed it. At any rate they are not here, and the events will bo confined to district horses. The principal event of the day — the Aramoho Annual Steeplechase — brings out eleven horses, 1 all of whom, with one exception, ran at the Wangamii Steeplechase meeting. The majority of these horses are worthy the name of steeplechasers, but there are one or two whose performances are not much admired, and are not expected to occupy a very prominent position in the event for which they are entered. We have the old chestnut Butcher Boy amongst us once more, and although he has been attended with mishaps in his recent tour through the provinces of Ne^on and Canterbury, still he is most fancied by outsiders, and being a sure jumper with plenty of bone and muscle, he should not be far away at the finish of three miles, over such a rough course as the Aramoho, notwithstanding the amount of work and travelling he has done lately. Hardy, who ran third in the Wanganui Gxand National last month, is in great form, and his admirers are not few. His well developed muscle and fine satin-liko skin speak volumes for his trainer, and a gamer horse never looked through a bridle. His pluck will sustain him when his strength fails. Mcdora ran remarkably well in the Grand National, and would probably have won the event had she followed the right course. When called upon she went to the front like a racehorse ; but her pins are rather shaky. She is, however, well supported. Flora is a mare with a very peculiar temper, and is not to"be trusted ; but si o surprised the knowing ones last year, as when Lloyd called upon her she came in with such a great rush at the finish for the Maiden, snatching the laurels from Barbara by a couple of lengths. If I were asked to name the first three, 1 should say Hardy, Meclora, and Butcher Boy, but as to the manner in which they will pass the po it I could not give a dofinite opinion. There are only seven entries for the Maiden, and I think there will be a vory small field ; at anyrato it could hardly be expected that the winner of the first event will again face the starter. The Maiden winner I think should come out of the following trio : Ireland, Brilliant, and St. Albans, provided Hardy does not start. Even if Hardy does start, I do not think his chances will be very great unless he is scratched for the big event. These are my own opinions, which I have given without prejudice, and it is only in a fow secondary points that I differ with tho majority of Wanganui sporting men. I think we may expect a good day's sport, and if the weather holds up a very good attendance might be expected.

The English mail which has just arrived brings further particulars of the Two Thousand Guinea Stakes, run at Ke.vmarket in the beginning of last month, when Lord Duppliu's Petrarch won in a cantor by th'-ee lengths, beating 13 others. Tho following is extracted from a Home paper :—: — Two Thousand Guinea Stakes, a subscription

. of iOO soys, ofich, i'or 3-year-okU, One mile 17 yards. Lord Dupplin's Petrarch, by Lord Clifdcn^ —Laura, Bst 101 b (Luke) \l Mr R. Peck's Julius Cmsar, by Sfc Albans ' —Julio, Sst 101 b (Webb) .. . . 2\ Lord Dupplin's Kaleidoscope, by Specu- \ lum—llecluse, Sst 101 b (Morris) ... 3 ' The following also ran ; Tho liascal, Charon, liosiniinte, (iliicis, Great Tom, Fetterlock, CoHuess, M. dc Fliguy, Catuenibort, King Death, Father Claret. Betting at starting ; .'} to 1 agst Kaleidoscope, 9 to 2 agst Great Tom, 100 to 12 agst Glacis, 10 to 1 agst Charon, 100 to 8 agst Julius Caesar, 100 to 7 agst M. Jde Pligny, 100 to 6 agst Petrarch, 20 to 1 agst Father Claret. 25 to 1 agst King Death, 4o to 1 agst Rosinante, 50 to 1 agst Coltuess, 50 to 1 agst Fetterlock. Camembert went oft at such a paoe that before reaching the T. Y. C. post he was four lengths in advance, but approaching tho Pushes Petrarch drew up, and whon. more than a quarter of a mile from home the race was literally over, Petrarch haviug posesssion of a olear load, which he held to the end, and won in a canter by three lengths ; a length and a half divided the second and third ; while Coltnesa, beaten not more thau a head from the favorite, was fourth ; Great Tom was fifth ; M. dc Flingy sixfh ; Camembert seventh ; Fetterlock eighth ; Rascal ninth, and Glacis tenth : the last four were KinJfl Death, Charon, Father Claret,and Rosiuantc|P

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WH18760622.2.13

Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES., Wanganui Herald, Volume X, Issue 2813, 22 June 1876

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1,060

SPORTING NOTES. Wanganui Herald, Volume X, Issue 2813, 22 June 1876

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