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Wanganui Herald [PUBLISHED DA I LY .] TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1876.

Mil Plimsoll may now consider his "labour of love " sis virtually ended. He has enlisted public opinion on his side, compelled the Disraeli (jovmiment to bring- in a Hill for the amendment of the Merchant Shipping Laws, and, what is of si ill greater importance, roused tho shipowners of the United ! Kingdom to take action in tlie matter, not for the purpose of ol"=tru<.tiiig aY legislation which immediately affect'- 1 their inter>sts, but for the perfectly legitimate one of sclf-proloclion. It is tho misfortune of nil movements of re form thai they involve reactionary tendencies which are as dangerous as tlio abuses .sought to bo reformed. When our attculion is drawn to a great evil I which we have allowed to gr<<w up unnoticed, we try to make amends for our negligence by an excess of zial in the way of reform, aud tlie consequence often is that our attempts at reformation do more harm than good. In the matter of the Merchant Shipping interest, ior instance, it seems certain that many of its members arc utterly destitute of principle, and ready to sacrifice lnmiiin life for tho fMkc of gain. Mr Plimsoll has drawn public attention to this fact, and in doing so lia^ in all probability incurred thai judicial blind-! ness which is charactci istic of reformers as a class. 'J hey generally concentrate their gaae upon the abuse until they can see nothing else, aud honce an 1 but ill-fitted for the task of devising- measures for its removal, final as is tho service which Mr Plinr-o!! ha^ rendered to the cause of humanity, lie should be about the most objectionable Icg'sl'lor that could possibly bu cho<Wto give effect to those reforms which he has shown to !»e npcessaiy. The very nobleness of his nature and the depth of his sympathies would hurry him into extremes. It would have been nothing short of a groat misfortune, if the sole charge of the Merchant Shipping "Bill had been left in his hands, and he had succeeded in carrying a measure after his own heart by bringing the force of public sympathy to bear upon Parliament. In that case we should probably have had an Act redress ing- the grievances of the seamen by doing injustice to the shipowners. The latter, a» a body, would have used every means that ingenuity could devise to vernier the new law unworkable ; counter-agitation on their part would have led to its repeal : a reaction would have taken place in public opinion, and the much needed reform would have been father off than ever.

The turn which things have act null}' taken is therefore, a matter for congratulation to all parlies concerned. The drag has been put upon the wheels

>f ivfon;\ i^rom ihe Cuvt l!) ' Di-meli •'n\or:'!!ii '!i imve s!:ov,n an; tiling but 1 11 nii.'.'U' v tv it.-!! inij)"iu' n^!y into ill-, 1 work. ij'l'i lo {h-'insiiivcs llicy j would },MH)lv.vbly hiw-j sluheil Uio ?\lcu'olianl .Shippiiu; Hill •.•itr-.TclIu 1 ! 1 , wlien they ilet'Tinined to pd^ljiom the ninsiJei'ation of it lust Hcssioii \ for llioy have all along acted in the matter like miMi who only moved in obedience to an impulse from without. They are by no iiiciins likely to orr in the wny of riisV.ncss or iiroci])itaiu'y, and will bt p'.'u'y to {live duo c:-nsido!'(Ui"n to llift su 'i'.ostiuns <«f H'.c c.i'ijiowiHT.s, \<\\o \vM 0 i^reat mooting in liOiuluti l«i<cly {or the j'Urjios. 1 of Ji'-cusrin^ 1 lb s }>ii Fi v nt iio^ition oi' iluMi 1 iili'iiii's in ivfiTiMH'V to 31 r I'Jin.soll's jLlonn a.sitHtion. The tone ol the mootini; would set'in to have been upon tho whole 5-arisfiictory. Some poreness avus very naturally 'niauifesled at iho jiorlinn^ soniCAvhat indiscriminate denmu'i;ilion.s <-i' which tlioy liavft boon lately inn.lt' ! ihe objects, and yn attempt was made jtorei'uio fonie of 31 r Plimsolls siate- ! menl's but with ihe cfiWlni' con tinnincj \ ratlier than refutinp, 1 them iv tlie jud-;-- ! mout of impartial percou.s. Tt wa.--I haiil that a larper j-ropo; tion of the loss I 01 life by pea was duo to the ignorance j and incompetency of the seamen, than !to tlie condition of the vessels. V.ut, apparently, those who made the assertion, did not think o(' exi)lainiui»; how it is that it becomes necessary to employ unqualified persons as sailors. Is it because experienced seamen refuse to risk their lives m rotten vessels, and it therefore becomes necessary to accept tho porvices of ignorant novices who do not know the danger that thro .ileus them ? Ot: course, however, no one will think of making the great body of British ship-owners responsible for the deeds ol the unprincipled and unscrupulous few. The danger is that wo may bo led, unconsciously, into legislating for those few as it they constituted Ilio groat majority, and this danger is now obviated. Tho Merchant Shipping Bill will be watched, in its passage through the Legislature, by a standing Committee of shipowners appointed at Hits late mating for that purpose, nor is thii'o any reason to apprehend that any really Vquilabie measure will be watched by them in a hostile spirit. On tin- f-oitrary, we should imagine that every honourable man connected with the shipping interest will be anxious to forward such a measure, for tlie purpose oh indicating hi-n self from all complicity with the miscreant.; who sacrilice human life to increase their own vile, gains. And if self-interest should blind the judgment of any such person, public opinion is now too thoroughly aroused to suffer injustice to be done. Mr Plimsoll and his sympathisers, whose name is legion, exercise a powerful in I fhiorteo in owe direclion ; the shipping 1 interest, too important to be disregarded in a "Teat commercial nati( v, exert their influence in another direction ; and 1 doubtless we shall have, as the resultant of Hi ese two forces, a thorough leadjuslme.nl of the laws relating to the mercantile marine, on a b^is which shall involvcevoLi-handod justice alike to the seaman and to his employer.

A uo-.Ci'KOVmisY is goin^ on tit Homo re.i peeling the moriU oi the Irhh Land Act, between not only the tenants but the landlords, sonic of whom are libcra enough to accept the popular or tenantright view. In fact there is already a strong party who espouse Mr ('right's view that prosperity cannot prevail until tho land is distributed amongst tho cultivators It is very gratifying to liml in the midst of much selfishness the following expression ot opinion from an Irish landlord, Mi- Eluard William O'JJrion, of County Limerick, in a letter which ho addressed to the Times, and in which he combats the argument of the landlords of uhointhfifc journal has constituted itself the partial advocate : --" You evidently regard tho English land system of luruo proprietors, large tenants prelected by contract only, and an unattached labouring class, as being the ideal on which iho land system of Ireland ought to be modelled, and lo which it is actually approximating. (Strange as it may seem, there are some independent observers in Ireland -and they are not without sympathisers in England— who, ho.vevcr gieat their admiration of the results, moral, intellectual, and political, of this highly aristocra'ic, or I shuultl perhaps rather say plutocratic, regime, do not desire to see it take, root iv Ireland ; who entertain the illusion that the problem which ha 5 been solved iv other countries may be solved here als > ; and v,lio believe that the establishment, in one division at least ot the United Kingdom, of a free peasantry, industrious and orderly, because sure of tho fruits of their labours, aud manly because subject to the caprice of no superior, would conduce lo the stability and progress, not of Irchnd alone, but of the whole community, and adorn and .strengthen the Empire with an element which iniis European territories is unhappily conspicuous by its absence."

The Aunual (ieueral meeting of tho "\Yanfauui Equitable L. B. and I. Society, will according to advertisement be held to-night, (Tuesday), and as the results of its operations are to bo communicated to the meeting, through tho Balance Sheet and .Report, its importance to members is too suggestive of itself, torciuiii-o an incentive to attendance at our hands. Two members of committee are also to bo elected on this occasion.

The ps Manawatu hsisboui playiug truant since her departure for Wellington last week, but we believe she has been enhancing the opportunities of festive recreation to the good folk of that city, by iollowing iv the wake, ot the Stormbivtl, in conveying excursionihls hither and lliitliu 1 . These friendly nvd'& of the deep vvould appear to bo " like Juno's swans, inseparable, " and we shall doubtless have them both up by the morning's tido to lill their respective places along

(I'.r w'liirf. When their flags urc not flying, iho i!i <,-'•>' m nppcirs at :i disadvantage, so "•ro: I i-; t!i<) Uriinnv m custom.

Tho Loadon License! nailers' Oazeltc Urns gi\ a the val'.io in moucy, of the various race?; in England during the course of the M , r :_ lt may bo noied lhat of the 1,909 r.itws run for this sp-hoii, three— the Derby, tho Two Thousand Guineas, and the Sb

L...JCI-— wero worth more than £4,000 $ ouc, the Middle Park Plate, more than £3,01)0, while fiveolhciN, the Onks, the Prince of Walcs's Sliikes at Ascot, the Cambridgeshire Stakes, the Ouc Thousand Guineas, and the J.i«)o)lii--hire il-JuV'cap, wire between £2,000 n.i! C^,001) in value. Nineteen racos were vnr'Ji from Ci,OJ'). (o £-2,000, :'-"«! sixiy-onc moie fiom XjOO to ■:I.OUO, iho total value of (ho eighty-mill) which came up to the histm. nLioncd figure being £ ( JG,IoG. The houoiu-ri of th'J paternity of the principal winner'; arc pretty equally divided amongst sovcr.il " sires," for if Vedette can claim the •.-.'iuu/T of the Doiby in Galopin, Macaroni's produce, thanks to the doings of Spinaway, Lily Allies, ;\nd ulhoi'A have won a far larger smu of money. Cambu^cm, tho sire of Ciimballo, is far ouLdonc by IJbiir Athol ; ami r,"id Olifdoii, even n" lie bad nob another winner, would occupy a good place with Petrarch, whose victory iv the Middle Park Plato is likely to bo but the first of a long KPrios. King Tom lias done well with n s;om.-v>b.:U Humorous produce, and the best of them was Skylark who, together with Petrarch, is looked upon as having a groat chance for tho next Derby. Nor, in this brief notice of the <v successful sires of tlie season," must wo omit to mention tho greatest of them all— Slonk well, tho sire of Doncastcr, who died five years ago, and uhoso produce ha\c now all left tho turf. Tl was ii fitting c'oso of the " record " of this horse, so justly termed " the Emperor of Stallions," t,h,il the two last of his stock, Dmictißter and (.Jang Forward, after winning several of the greatest races of th n ir d;<y j should have been sold within six months for close upon twenty thousand ponnls.

V\ r e are indebted to a fiiond for enabling us (o reproduce what doubtless is familiar to many ol our readers, and which read iv the light of parsing events possesses a present in fccrest. ile oboorres : " The following which is known as Mother Shipton's prophesy was iirst published in 1-188 and re-published in 1(3 i1.. It, will be noticed that the events predicted mit except that; ineiifcioiiftd in the last two lines have already come to pass :—: — Carri:i;r<.'- without hor-o-> sh.ill y,o, Au 1 itL-cMfiit-j fill lho woilil wib'i woo, Avoun I Mil' wdi'Kl tlioiirfits '■lull lly lit I!)'. 1 twinl-lini; ni'nsi eye. \\">it(.'i" s'.all ye. morj woudeisdo j JN'uw fctr.m^o, imtMuil! bo true. ilio '.vui'l up ido ilowi: Mi ill be, Ami >;c.UI l,e loiin.l .it, lv.ot «l Uoj. Tlii'uiigh hilK men yiflc, And no lior-jo of ie-s by his hide. Und v \witormen ill walk, fli:ill ride, Ml ills'wp -lull t-ilk. In i!it % i\.v iiiuii sh.ill Lo -00011, in uh.to, in Ijliuili, in fcroon. Iroii in rho water --h.Ui llo.it A- c.-3 .i-.;i wn.nlo'i bo.it. (■old >li.ul lie ioinid,i'iid loinul In a land tli.it''> i. (it now known. ji iio and um'i r ->lul! \. oiult 11^ do ; liii^liiud '■hall at Lu,t .idinit a.low. Tlio world t j ii)i end conic, ]n oijjji oon inindiod and oiyli'y one 1

For the last day or two the now macliincr} litoly imported for printing thoiIF.KVU) ha s b'jviu in uctivc operation, aud with the best result j. The walcr engine is 2 horse power, aud is of Colonial manufacture, having beets made to order by Messrs A. and T. Burfc oi Duuediu, and fully laaiiuairis their leputatioii i'oi- \h\a ilcseripllou of machinery. Tdi pre-'Uii'C of wiitev is ioiuul amply suflicieul to dri\e cverytn.'ng ; in fact the printing mac'iiue lun ing uken so little maiuial labdiu tokeepii ,t, r °i»o '^ ih'st.we werequite jircparcd for this result. It fully bears out tho assertions of tho manufacturers, Messrs L'lly lV Co., of London, who Kuar.iiifctfo it to print ]„jOO impression, i an hour, for day after day as Lho friction is rjducod, the number ol copies printed increases, till wo reached last night the rate of 1,000 an ho:!i\ and tint without fall procure being applied. There arc of course defects to be looked f( r at first, in \\oik turned out by new machinery, but we think wo may congratulate ourselves nnd our readers now.iv h wing everything in working order, aud tending we triul to'eontriimte to our mutual advautdgo. It is due to T\lr Joseph Palmer to state tliat the wiiolc of cho work has oecn done under his supervision, aud tlie entire machinery creeled by him, and we havo pleasure in testifying to the o'Mc-iout performance of his contract.

Says ii Ff'Mne piper : — A ouiLjus historical relic of Oliver Croinwoll hxrf jisl boon dhcoyercil by ifessrs i'lillick aud Simp.s'm, of i^iceslcr-sfjii.Tvo, cousislijij: of an old pen and ink drawing of a "Plan of B-iflcll,"' drawn i:n and signed by O. Cromwo'l, showing tho relative no-jHions of the Republican and lio\a!is( armies, inclu.lin,^' tliooo of :: ' I). Oroun\ell, lAuLTaxo, tUo cnomyo, &c," also a pious adjuration in tlie autograph of the Protector, in which lie says — " O in \y ye Lord Jielpo mo in miiso pioii^ unilcrt.iuiiiffc liia yn rr 11c«-1 1c«-1 c« -. t !ii r ';hc. I will cuet L tlic.n o't' roote and Li'dii-'ko." The I'oregoing arc ins-.-rte I in an old volume on " /vlulicmy," hy J. it. Glauber, tho discoverer of. Milphalu of soda, of whom Oliver (Jioiu * ell inserts his opinion, in the following lines, also in his own h.ui'l writing :—: — "fd p\\ ile (!!auber is an arrant knave. 1 don bolhiuko mo he spc.ikcth oil wondevrs ttiiiohc c.muotte bee uccoinpiUhe 1, ncvertheles.ie it I ys lawi'til! for man t-ja tho ondoavofir." Ifad the ni in with the Lr.m Crown been inlroiHiced to t:io s.ilLi bearing Iho name of t.ho :l')11-<oJ alo'ismisfc, he could liaidly liiiva buen more vicious in presenting him with a diplonu lliau he appears to he above. The toa-mooliuj and soiree in celebration of the anniversary of tiro Sandon Wo.-Ucyan Church on Friday last was a:i immoiiiO success. Between .'SOO and 400 attended, and consequently the tables, which were cove rod with eatables of the most tasty description, wore required to be re stocku I on more than o'ie occasion. The lady prooidcnfcs over t.he Lables performed ilieir duties in a mo 4 satisfactory nnnnur, and ihcatUnl.uilsg.nt; cv«jry indiealion of- beii'y well pleased with the entertainment. A soiree succecdet! the lea, which \v«>s presided over ljy Mr Cower, when several reverend ii i addros'sed the meeting. Thoir specohes worn preeeiled by anthems from the choir, wliio'i .'is.i^ted in ( o iMilei'.ibly onlivui.i i'j t!r; pirly. Tiitj meeting was on l !!tual!y brought (o a close, and everyone wont to their respective honic rf apparently well pleased.

Ths fallowing- hordes loft per s.s. Wallace !a*t evening hi order to participate in tho Nelson ■Rice°. and we hope, some of thorn at least on their return may sport tho hurels of viotovy :— Mr J. W. Jackson's Eolly and Grinsborough ; Mr I. Freoth's Treason, and Sutelite ; Messrs McEae and Nicholson's Butcher Buy and Gazelle. We understand that the horses belonging to the last named gentlemen are botn entered for the Christchurch Handicap Steeplechase on 24th May and will also start for Nelson Hurdle Jlaee. Medora, also owned hy them, remains in her stable to vindicate its honour here at Ihe appuaehing steeplechases.

Yfo havo been indebted to the .steward of tho Wangauui Hospital for tho followiug :—: — L'.itu-nt.s admitted from January Ist, 1875, to December 3 lsb of tho same year : Males 151, females 4 ; out of winch number four males and one female have breathed their labt. There arc now remaining in the Hospital 5 males and 2 females.

Tlio annual Sunday school treat announced to have been held to day, was unavoidably postponed on account of ihe inclemency of iho weather, but should to-morrow prove nne it will beheld at the Mission house, if not, it is intended to hold it in the Odd Fellows Hall.

The salo by auction of tho 12,000 acres of very valuable agricultural crown lands, the advertisement; announcing which appears in another column, will bo held to-morrow, at 11 a.m , at tho Provincial Government buildings, Wellington. The land is all spoken of as being good, but as there has of late been a considerable quantity in the market, wo do not, anticipate that it will prove the success these sales have formerly been.

Tho sale al, Mr Eilors', under the presidency of Mr Bcauchainp, seems to progress, and those who attend appear to be easily accommodated. To-morrow will witness a rcnov.al of tlie proceedings.

Tils Pvcv. Mr Elmslie will deliver a, valedictory discourse unxt Sunday morning, and in the evenin;; nreach his farewell sermon-

An accident occurred yesterday to a Wanffaiiui tradesman am! his daughter who \vere en route for Marton, while turning a corner on the road running down Gowcr's hill, on tho other side of Turakina. Tho conveyance in which they were riding was a buggy, pulled by a young horse. Having gone too near the edge of the road the buggy capsized with its occupants ami turned over, i-ost'ng finally against .1 gorso hedge at tho foot of the hilJ. One of the shafts was broken, and the horse, when soon by our informant, was resting across the hedge. The young lady, wo believe, received a shaking but not of a serious character, while her father came off more fortunate. We have not heard definitely who tho parties were, but we have good grounds for our supposition.

In tho B.M. Court to-day before Dr Giles, 11. M., several civil cases were called v somo of which were settled out of Court, aud in others the summonses had not been served. The only one disposed off was M. Y. Hodge v. Charles Endei by being on a Promissory Nuic of .-C'J;), and in which judgment was coufc-« c cd. Two inebriates, -Totui Brown and John Murray, after doing ponanco over ni-ht, were fined ss. It is a fact worthy of record, that notwithstanding the temptation 'ncklenLal to this guy and festive season, and tho facilities afforded for the gratification of tlvit pchch'tnl whose name is "frailty," the wry uuinlr.'i" of thoso come beneath the frown of [lie Jaw, should present so strong a testimony in favour of the genera', sobriety f ihe community.

Tho foolbaU club " kicked up tho!r heels' ' for the first time this season, yesterday on tlie Knee Course turf, and as it was a general he-luluy, an open invitation was cx-W-mlcil to the general public to tako part in (he competition, which was as readily emliracod as oflerod. (J.intiius SLea<lioan and Powell having picked their respective foicos, the s'.iino proceeded with great animation, and wns for a long time conducted vt'dh wavering fortune being placidly contested but when t!)C "star that calls the bee to rost " terminal od the contest Captain Powell roeorded 2 goals. Tho Club lniv-i made a uood boKiniiiiia and judfciug from the provaillnu' enthusiasm scorn determined to kick to 3omo purpose in future. A caso of petty laret'iiy occurred en the groaud and it is to ba hoped tint discovery will overtake tho culprit. Ono of tho players threw off his coat and on returning found that nea.ily 20s smd a poekot-kiii c o had been abstracted from it. Those .sort of caj.o3 are happily rare hero, and it is to be hoped that no false charity will intervene to prevent punishment to the offender.

A sad story (says tho London Weekly Times) lias just been Jittingly terminated by the death of three persons who wore its heroes One of those actors w.;s a man of hivh scientific attainments, an astronomer, and a Fellow of the Royal o-K'H'ly ; (he second was a pretty, but illiterate woman ; tho third a miscreant, who died in prison. The learned man was Mr Oarrinijlon, who lived for many years in a lovely anil romantic spot, at which ho had couslruclecl an observatory, at L'herf, nonr Karnhain. One day Mr Uarringkn moi in Roijonl-Ftroct a goodlonkimr and al tractive young women IVo;n Bristol, but of much lower station tiion he was. Unfortunately for (he happinoi^()l"all throe, she had relations \m'|']i a. man naniod I'odway, but, although Mr (!amn<<lnu knew partly her previous hisiory, bo married the fair and I'n'il ono, mlio, however, deceived her husband fo (his exlont, that she represented Ko'lway as lior brolhftr. This I'olhnv koj.t Mrs (Jarrin^lon in abject fear of him, and b}' working on her fears lie c njtinually received monoy from the fri.jhlenod \voinon by threatening to reveal her deception to her husband. At length desperate of losing his sweetheart, aud alboin" refused more money, and failing to induce Mrs Oarringto'i Lo run off with him, he visited the lonely house al (Jhorl, and so savagely jissaullod her that she narrowly escaped death .-it his hands. He was apprehended, sentenced lo twenty yr.w^' penal servitude for aitemplfd murder, and shortly •iftorwards died in gaol. A short time a<;o Mrs Carrinj/ton was IVmnd dead in bed by her husband when he awolec in the nioniim?; and a few days after llxo inquestin this case was com-ludcd, the polico, notictii'.', an unu-al ({uictne.-is about L\il> house, b.-okeopen the door and found Mr Cari'in^ton lyiiiij dead upon the mattress. Thus ends a i-in^ular romance, the elements ol which, if they had formed the foundation of a novel, would be regarded as impossible.

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Bibliographic details

Wanganui Herald [PUBLISHED DAILY.] TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1876., Wanganui Herald, Volume X, Issue 2757, 18 April 1876

Word Count
3,770

Wanganui Herald [PUBLISHED DAILY.] TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1876. Wanganui Herald, Volume X, Issue 2757, 18 April 1876

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