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The Evening Herald. THURSDAY, SEPT. 18, 1873.

The Legislative Council has brought about a crisis by its rejection of the Provincial Loans Empowering Bill, "which at this particular moment will be attended with grave consequences to the country. The Government supporters in the House of "Representatives ■will have their ranks immediately recruited, and preparations will be promptly made to alter the constitution of the Tipper House ; for it is only too evident that a few men alienated from public opinion and sympathy will not be permitted to usurp the functions of Government and direct the policy of the country. How could any Government exist if all its vital measures are to be destroyed by a body which is entirely above the salutary effects of public opinion 1 The difficulty is one ■which calls for a prompt remedy. The constitution provides for the nomination of an unlimited number of new

tion.

members. This affords the Government a means of carrying its policy in spite of the party at present dominating the Council, and the Colony will expect the Government to exercise all the powers reposed in it by the constitution. Compromise seems to be out of the question, as the majority is too decided to admit of it. A clique of large capitalists exists in the Council, and as an alkali is required to neutralise an acid, the Governor should be advised to appoint a number of men of the Lahnian stamp to counteract the WhitmoreWaterhouse element. It can easily be done, unless the Governor should refuse to be guided by his responsible advisers —an unlikely contingency. We think the Government will be compelled to adopt the course: none other, save absolute submission to the junto of capital, is open to them. But can they find the men 1 We cannot pronounce very conclusively on this subject. The Dunedin Guardian some time ago recommended the Government to nominate a number of the Armed Constabulary. Many serious objections, however, present themselves to the course, and it is one not likely to be adopted even in very extreme cases. Gentlemen of radical tendencies must be found who will not be displeased at a three months' visit to Wellington and the receipt of £105 to pay their expenses. We have no doubt the requisite number with the fitting qualifications can be found in the Colony. Let them bo called together. If they are ordinary tradesmen ifc does not matter ; perhaps would be all the better. They should have no sympathy with our mushroom aristocracy, but bo plain, common-place men, of clear instincts and popular sympathies. We await the resolve of the Government with all the interest attaching to so grave a crisis in our parliamentary history.

It is a noticeable fact that the three newlyelected Councillors are determined to shew that the confidence of the ratepayers has not been misp laced, and that they intend to be working bees in the hive of Municipal industry. Or Duthie tabled a motion on Wednesday night most important in its working, and one that will effectually prevent any useless expenditure. The resolution has very carefully drawn up, the promise of a keen supervision of the Borough funds promised by the Or in his address being carried out. Or Laird has devoted himself to regulat ing and improving the system of gravelling the streets of the Borough previously in operation. This work, a not unimportant one, Cr Laird's experience well fits him to take in hand. Cr Bamber, in promising a motion dealing with the powers of the several committees appointed, meets the wishes of a large number of the ratepayers. He also intimated that the question of gas works had received his attention, that he would be prepared to speak in opposition to the work, giving, at the same time, statistics in support of his views. It will thus be seen that the first working meeting of the Council has developed the new blood, and indication is given that " more work and less politics " seems to be the guiding spirit of the Council as a whole.

The Thames Advertiser says :—" The Municipality question is set at rest by the receipt of a General Government Gazette of August 28th, in which the missing jjetition is published by the Hon Daniel Pollen, Colonial Secretary. The petition also embraces a memorandum from His Honor the Superintendent of the Province, stating that he " does.; not dissent from the prayer of the petition," and suggesting that " certain endowments from the Thames foreshore and otherwise should by act be granted to the Municipality in order to make it successful in carrying into effect its duties."

Any ill feeling caused by the late elections seems to have subsided in Wanganui or remains quiescent, as no outward manifestation is made. This is as it should be, and we regret exceedingly to hear of a disgraceful occurrence happening at Waitotara, we believe on Saturday last. It was well known that three working men named Dogherty, travelled from Kakaramea to Wanganui on purpose to record their votes for Mr Laird. Returning back up the coast they stopped at the Waitotara for dinner. While there they were first abused and then assaulted by three men named Nathan, (one of them being in the Armed Constabulary, and stationed at Waitotora) and Reuben Bason. After the assault was over, apoloI gies were offered by the Nathans. Two ; natives were present and their names were taken by the injured men for witnesses, but the Maoris after put the characteristic question " how much the utn." Such are the plain unvarnished facts which reflect little credit on the attacking party. Working men must be protected in the exercise of their suffrage, and mob law put down with a firm hand. If the Doghertys are sufficiently generous as not to seek the redress the law provides for them, and accept the apologies offered them, their conduct should make the other side heartily ashamed of their ac-

The Deputy Superintendent of Taranaki, Ivir Crompton, at the inauguration of .the Waitara railway, said great credit was due to Mr Carrington and others for making it a Colonial liability. We have no doubt Mr Crompton has been misinformed by his official superior, Mr Carrington, whose imagination is not controlled by facts. A correspondent of the Taranaki Herald states the matter fairly :—

" There has been a question put in the House by Mr Bi-yce, which tends to let in a little light on the railway liability, the answer, to which will, I have no doubt, open the eyes of some people in New Plymouth to a sense of the foundation on which their change of opinions with regard to the railway construction has been based. Mr Brycc asks whether any promise has been made by the Government to the Superintendent, or members of the Province of Tanmaki, that the provisions of section 12 of the " Immigration and Public Works Act, 3871," shall not apply to that portion of the Waitara-Wanganui railway now under construction ; and if so, (1) where the record of such promise can be found. (2). Upon what conditions, as regards local responsibility, the construction of the line is proceeding. The answer of the Minister of Public Work's was to the effect—" That no such promise was made. That the construction, as regards local respousibilty, is the same as other lines in other Provinces." This reply will have the effect of making some people who suddenly became the advocates for railway construction, look rather foolish, and will place them on the horns of a dilemma, from which it will be difficult to escape.

Our contemporary has played the Cuttle Fish, and abandoned all his « facts :l and ''arguments" amidst an unmeaning plethora of words. He must not imagine that it is a saving clause to have used the words—" if oiu- conclusions ai-e correct " • for unfortunately for his attempt at escape his facts are wrong. However, as lie says : '■ we frankly confess our regret at having drawn the conclusion we did in our article of the 12th," we presume he regrets his facts also, and we have no wish to press him further. Tho little twaddle about " inspiration :> and "glamour " is worthy o him. Requiescat in pace.

The competition for choice of Melbourne representatives has been commenced at New Plymouth. Two stages out of three have fired the highest scores at present, being R. Bayly 105, T. Humphries 103, E. Harrison 100, R. J. Collins 99, and W. Humphries 98. The first stage took place on Thursday, the 28th August, the ranges being 100, 150 and 200 yards. Target, 6x2; bull's eye' 8 inches ; and 2 feet centre. Mr R. Bayly was the highest scorer, with 57 points out of a possible 60. The second stage took place on Wednesday, the 10th September, the ranges being 250, 300 and 350 yards. Target, 6x4; bull's eye, 2xl; and 4x2 centre. The highest scorer being Mr R. J. Collins, who scored fifty-four out of a possible sixty.

The appellants on the organ question at the Presbyterian Church intend holding a meeting at the Oddfellows Hall on Tuesday next.

From an English paper of June 1860 we clip the following paragraph:—The William Tapscott, which sailed from Liverpool a few days ago, had on board 811 Mormons whose destiny is the Great Salt Lake. There were 125 married men, and 175 married women, 146 single men and 149 single women, 80 male and 92 female children, and 18 male and 26 female infants ; 354 were English, 22 Scotch, 35 Irish, and 400 foreigners.

Among the names of the principal buyers at Marton land sale the name of H. M. Beaven was given ; it should have H. M. Brewer.

In reply co Mr Tokamoana, Mi McLean said there never had been a . proclamation offering- £1,000 for Tito Kowaru's capture. The Forest Rangers wwere promised £1,000 if they caught him, but that force was disbanded.

Mr Nathan, of the late firm of Jacob Joseph and Co., is about to erect a monster store in Wellington. The contract price for its erection is £4,000.

The Otago Times learns by telegram that Messrs Shaw and Savill have reduced their freights from London to New Zealand to 30s per ton.

The annual session of the R.W. Grand Lodge of the A.1.0.0.F., was held on the 22nd, 25th, 27th, and 29th ult., in the Lodge Room?, Oriental Hotel. After the transaction of a large amount of. buisiness the following brethren were elected for the ensuing term :—M. W. Grand Master, Ero. Michie ; R. W. Deputy Grand Master, Bro. Teague ; R. W. Grand Warden, Bro. Alexander; R.W. Grand Treasurer, Bro. Gourley. The M. W. Grand Master then made the following- appointments: W, Grand Marshall, Bro Mercer; W, Grand Conductor, Bro Spares; W. Grand Chaplin, Bro Wheeler ; W. Grand Guardian Bro Clifford ; W. Grand Herald, Bro Shepherd. He also appointed as District Deputy Grand Masters the undermentioned brothers :—For Wanganui, Bro Ballance : for Timaru, Bro Wallis; for Oamaru, Bro Bayley ; for Mount Ida, Bro London. After a few remarks from the Grand Master, the Lodge was formally closed—Otago Witness

BOROUGH COUNCIL,

Meeting held at the Court House on Wednesday, Sept. 17th. Present—Councillors Finuimore, Beaven, Bamber, Brown, Hutchison, Chevannes, Dutliie, Laird and Nathan.

Cr Brown was voted to the Chair, and the minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

ELECTION OF MAYOR

Cr Oiiavannes moved that Or Hutchison be the Mayor of Wangamii. Cr Dutiiie had pleasure in seconding the motion. At present crisis of Municipal affairs, when theywere on the eve of very extensive1 * undertakings, it was most desirable that the office of Mayor should be filled by a gentleman of ability and experience in management of public affairs. Mr Hutchison was also a gentleman whose high character would, reflect honor on the position. The Council would be exceptionally fortunate in having the seat tilled by one so well qualified, and who could afford, not being engaged in business, to give the requisite attention to the duties of a purely honorary position. Mr Hutchison's claim for the appointment was strong on other grounds ; the public regarded him as the leader of the opposition in the disputes between the Council and the ex-Mayor, and ;is the ratepayers in each ward had supported the Council, he considered that Mr Hutchison's claim on the vacancy was recognised by the burgesses. Further, refering to matters more immediately provincial, the ex-Mayor, a member of the Provincial Executive, had recently publicly stated that, with some other district members, he had waited on the Superintendent to urge that a larger sum should be alloted from the proposed loan than £5000 for the river, but that he was unable to securo this. Since a vote of want of confidence in the ex-Mayor had been carried, they had noticed £10,000 apportioned to this work from the new loan, and a second bridge over the Rangitikei river, which would connect the upper Manawatu block with this port. He considered this small measure of justice was solely due to the fact having dawned on the Wellington party that Wanganui was no longer a pocket-Borough of Mr Watt's. The appointment of Mr Hutchison, a gentleman so well known in politics, would further prove to the Wellington authorities that this district can no longer safely be left out in the cold, and that if the Province was to remain uuited, it must be dealt more justly with as an integral portion of the Province.

No other name being proposed, the motion was put and carried, Crs Finnimore and Nathan retiring while the vote was taken.

His Worship having thanked his fellow Councillors for the honour of the Mayoralty, said that he would endeavour to justify the trust reposed in him by a firm and impartial administration, and he felt sure that he might rely upon their help in maintaining that order and those rules which were so necessary for the proper and speedy despatch of business. He hoped also that they would all be found cooperating together heartily for the ad vancement of those works which were necessary for the improvement and commerce of the town over which they had the honor to preside ; and when he spoke of them co-operating, he did not moan anything so absurd as that they should j be in perfect agreement upon the various details that came before them. Among a number of free and intelligent men, differences of opinion would certainly arise, and it was neither necessary nor even desirable that it should be otherwise ; all that seemed requisite for the purposes of co-operation was that there should be a measure of taking and giving. Everyone would find, if lie did hot wish to act the part of a mere obstructive, that he would probably have to do a little more in one direction, a little less •in another, and somewhat differently in the.third, than he originally.. intended. . Co-operation required this much, but no more. And if they kept this fact' in view they would see that it at once answered the question sometimes asked, as to what this one or that one had done for tliis district 1 2STo single individual could do anything very appreciable by himself for a place. ° And in their case they could only carry out \vorks of importance "by acting in concert one with another, and if they did so honestly and disinterestedly they would do well. He trusted that such would be his and their aim and object. They had now initiated works for a supply of water to the town ; he hoped by the time another annual election came round that the pipes for this undertaking would be landed on their shores or at all events not far from them. After the water pipes were ordered there would be a lull in that undertaking which would afford time to turn to the important question of drainage, which he trusted would be so managed as to conduce to the health and comfoit of the inhabitants. There was also ihe important work of reclaiming the foreshore, which was now in a fair way of becoming the property of the Corporation. This work would require much care, inasmuch as it would be of little use for them to expend a large sum of money in builclinoa Quay at which vessels of all sizes might discharge, if they had not the co-operation of the Provincial, or other authorities in deepening and improving the channel of the river so as to permit vessels to get alongside that Quay. It was gratifying, however, to find that the independent attitude taken up by the people of \Vangjinui hail already produced a certain effect, as the Council would notice that the Provincial Government now jiroposed to make the sum for our river improvement £10,000 instead of £5000 as originally proposed. He would not, however, detain them with any farther reference to these questions, as there would be ample opportunity for their discussion in the future ; he - would therefore call upon the members to proceed with the business before the meeting

FINANCE COMMITTEE.

Cr Bambek, moved that Ors Beaven, Duthie, and the mover be the Finance Committee, Cr Duthie to be Chairman. Seconded by Cr Brown and carried.

WATER WORKS COMMITTEE,

Cr Ohkvannes moved, "That this Council do resolve itself into a committee of the whole to consider th^ water works »nd gas works." Seconded by Cr Laird. Or Finnimore objected to verbal resolu-

tions, and Cr Ohevannea wrote his motion, and included all the members of the Council. Or -fcinmmore then wished his name withdrawn from the committee At the lost meeting his name had been included in several committees, but it appeared that most of the members had an antioathy to act on a committee with him. "lie had therefore decided to act as an independent member, and join no committee. Cr Brown objected to Or Finnimores action.. The Mayor gave his opinion that no member had a right to withdraw his name if the whole Council desired it should remain, but as no objection was offered in the pre-M-nt case, the name should be struck oi:t. ihe motion was then put and carried.

PUI3LIC WORKS COMMITTEE.

Cr Laird moved that Ors Bamber. Chevannes, Brown, and the mover be the Public Works Committee, Cr Bam her to da Giuunnan. Seconded by Or Dutliie. Or Bamber wished his name withdrawn He was already on two committee.,, and while no, being desirous of shirking any portion of public duty he thought his name should be taken oft Or Browr. and Or Finnimore , having spoken to the motion, an amendment was moved by Or Brown thai Or Bamber, Laird, and Finuimore be the committee, the last named to be Chairman. Cr Bamber again desired to have his name omitted. It was a highly important committee, and the best men should be obtained, lhey had not worked together previously, or else the mistakes so Generally complained of would not have been made. The amendment was ultimately wnndrawn, and the motion put and carried.

BRIDGE, WHARF, AXD FORESHORE COMMIT-

TEE. Cr OiiBVANNES moved that Crs Beaven, iNathan, Duthie, and the mover be the Bndgo and Wharf Committee, Cr Beaven to be Chairman. Seconded by Cr Brown. Or Duthie suggested that the foresnore be added to the Committee. Agreed to. 'Jhe motion was then put and carried.

HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. Cr Chrvannes moved the reappointment of the Hospital Committee (the Mayor Crs Brown and Beaven). Seconded by Or Bainber. Cr Brown stated that Mr Thos. Keid had refused to act as a member of the Committee. His name having been omitted, the motion was put and carried

POWERS OP COMMITTEES. Or Bambbr thought that the powers of the Committees should be denned* In the past they had acted almost on their own vesponsi bihty. So me further discussion ensued, and Or Bamber intimated that he would give notice of motion dealino- V 'ith the matter. Cr Brown moved that the Mayor be ex officio a member of all the Committees. Seconded by Or Laird Cr Fmuiinore thought that four members'having been appointed for the Public Works Committee two of them representing Queens Ward, and now that the Mayo? representing St John's Ward, was put on it. Cook * Ward would receive an injustice, lhe Mayor said he had no feelino- m the matter, but he knew it was a custom in other Boroughs for the Mayor to be ex ofhcio a member. Or Duthie thought there would ue no fear of injustice, as Or Bambers promised notice of motion would distinctly define the powers of the Committee Moreover Cook's Weird had Or Brown on the Committee, a sufficient guarantee that its interests would be studied.' The motion was put and carried.

DECLARATION BY THE VALUATOR.

The usual declaration by Robert Spark Low, unent the valuation was read.

CORRESPONDENCE

lhe letters held over from last meetinowere again read. Those connected with public works were referred to that committee. Cr Brown speaking to Mr Townsheud's- letter, stated that it contained untruths, and proceeded to refute the mistatements.

_ The Mayor thought that letters couched in improper terms or containing untruthful statements should not be laid before the Council. Any such writer put himself out of Court. The motion was then put and carried. .•■ .-. • :' . ... . ■ ■'.

nuisances. . ' • .. . The Inspectors report produced at the last meeting was again, brought forward, and referred to the Public Works Committee. On the question of the excessive charge made by the nightmen, the report of the committee passed at a former meeting, was read, and Or Brown thought the complaints unjust inasmuch as the ratepayers had the power to make the best arrangements.

TEE BUTCHERS', COMPLAINT.

Consideration of the complaint sent in by the butchers was next proceeded with.. Or Beaven thought it would be unnecessary to sro to the expense of rescinding the bye-law, but if the Mayor would request the Ser-'t. of Police not to unduly press the observance of the bye-law, the object of the memorial would be met. He would move that the letter, lie on the table. Cr Fiunimore agreed with Cr Beaven, and seconded the motion. Cr Brown thought that the Council should endeavour to revise any set of bye-laws if it was found they were unworkable. He would move that the Council meet that day week to revise the bye-laws. Seconded by Cr Nathan. Cr Duthie thought the Council should not put itself into the pitiful position of begging the police not to enforce the Corporation bye laws. If the bye law was too stringent it should be struck out. He considered that other clauses wore too stringent —driving cattlethrough the streets was prohibited during certain hours. This harsh law m a place deriving a largo revenue from its cattle trade was hurtful. He would support the amendment. On a vote bein«taken the amendment was lost, and the original motion carried.

AVIIARP.

Cr Duthie moved " That Mr Wrio-ht's letter respecting certain improvements' to bo effected on the Wharf, bereferred to the Wharf Committee with power to d al with the matter.'1 Seconded by Or Brown and carried.

HORTICULTUHAL SOCIETY. Or Pjuown moved that the letter sent in by the above Society asking- for the patronage of the Mayor and Council lie on the table. Seconded by Or Nathan. Or Duthie moved as an amendment that the request•' be complied with. This not bein»-: secon led fell through, and the motion was : carried. ;

FORESHORE

The Mayor stated that the Foreshore ! Bill had passed both the Houses and" had j

become law. The whole of the foreshore was now in the hands of the Superintendent, and would be granted to the Corporauon at the eail'.est date possible. The Mayor read the correspondence that had passed between him and Mr Bryce on the subject.

WATER 'WORKS.

Or Bambf.h moved that the Engineer's report be referred to the Water Works Committee to be considered at a meetir."on Monday next at 7 p.m. Seconded by Or Laird. Or Brown thought that the discussion should be in public, although past committee meetings had been held with closed doors. The Mayor thought the Press and the public should be admitted to all their meetings.

EARTH CLOSETS,

Or FiNNiaroitE's motion on this subject, held over from last meeting, was brought forward and withdrawn by consent of the Council.

GAS WORKS,

The Mayor suggested that the consideration of this subject should be held over till the next meeting. His sole objectin bringing the matter forward was to ascertain the feeling of the ratepayers, as to the advisability of introducing gas, concurently with water. His motion would be taken up lie had no doubt by some other member. Or Bamber said he was prepared to oppose the introduction of gas into the town, but as the motion would be brought up again, he would reserve his remarks.

LIABILITIES,

A notice of motion respecting the liabilities of the Borough standing in the name of Cr Duthie was withdrawn by the Council. Or Dulhie stated that as Chairman of the Finance Committee he intended to bring up a full report at the first of the quarter!

GRAVELLING.

Or Ladrd moved that the gravelling of the streets be let by tender' for a period say three years, at so much per year, and that the Engineer be instructed to prepare specifications." The Or very sensibly advocated the importance of the motion. Cr Chevannes thought the matter had been met_ by the Engineer, having already received instructions to prepare specifications for all contracts at the beginning of the year. Cr Finnhnore seconded the motion, and warmly complimented the mover i.n his remarks. Or Baraber opposed the motion. Cr Duthie supported the motion, but suggested that it should first be. sent to the Public Works Committee for discussion. Cr Nathan moved as an amendment that the question be referred to tl>e Public Works Committee. Seconded by Cr Brown. The amendment was put and carried.

NOTICE OF MOTION.

Or Duthie then gave notice that he would move at the next meeting-, that in order to prevent misunderstandings between the Ootnmittees of the' Council and the Engineer, the Council hereby resolves—

1. " That all works shall be initiated by the Council, or by one or others cf the Committees to which the charge of such works may have been remitted.

2. That after an estimate has been obtained" of the probable expense of any work to be done, and a general plan of its execution has been agreed upon between the Committee having1 it in charge and the Eugineer, the latter shall see to its b-ing carried out, and, if necessary, report upon it from time to time to the" Committee.

3. That in all cases where materials, tools, or other requisites are naeded, areciuisition for the same shall be sent to the"parciular Committee, who shall order the same if the}' see cause.

4. No liabilities shall be incurred on behalf of the Council,' but on an order signed by the Mayor or Chairman :of th<s particular Committee on whose behalf it is issued and countersigned by the Town Clerk.

5. That the Engineer shall employ such number of workmen as the Public Works Committee may direct."

The Council then adjourned till 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Ist October.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Herald. THURSDAY, SEPT. 18, 1873., Wanganui Herald, Volume VI, Issue 1900, 18 September 1873

Word Count
4,548

The Evening Herald. THURSDAY, SEPT. 18, 1873. Wanganui Herald, Volume VI, Issue 1900, 18 September 1873

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