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The Evening Herald. SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1873.

COLONIAL TELEGRAMS

WELLINGTON. _ Rom our own correspondent.

' March 1. Entrances for Maiden Plate, nine horses ; Jockey Club Plate, six ; Ladies Purse, four; Wellington Plate, nine ; Hutt Park, 10 ; Publicans' Purse, 8. The town is getting crowded.

(PER ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PRESS TELE-

GRAPH COMPANY.)

-WELLINGTON,

'■;■■'■•■ •.:"•:'■'• ' .March 1. The Governor .still refuses.tp, -.accept Waterhouse's resignation. -Phoebe, unable to bring all excursionists from Lyttelton to. Wellington Regatta. ■ v _.---/:': - ■-.---■.-

Ra_-gatira despatched for remainder".

Paterson unable to obtain coal for passage to Auckland. Obliged to use wood. Ben Nevis cleared for London; cargo valued at £18,218. NAPIER. 54 new ■ complaints for enquiry- by Commission gazetted, making total of 297 ; nearly all repudiated land cases within the past years. ...t : :.■■■■ DUNEDIN. Thirty thousand pounds worth of shares in Christchurch Shipping Company subscribed here.

There is one principle which the Municipal Council thoroughly believes in, and that : is procrastination. The greater portion of its business at the last meeting was ''. ordered to lie on the table." The Town Clerk could not-find the copy of the letter which he had addressed to certain gentlemen on the Hospital.-Committee

question, and notice of the appointment of this important body was not even <nven.

Mr. Millar, our newly appointed engineer, does not seem to be so disparaginly tliought and spoken of in other places as he is in Wanganui. Wo take an article from the 'Australasian,' in which, those qualities are referred to th.it we most require in the director of Municipal works, and we can only suppose that the objections raised against him here were fabricated with an occult design to servo some other purpose than good local administration. In the Australian Town and Country Journal of the"Bth instant, appears a f>i-ogi-aphyof the Hon. Julius Vogel, C.M.G. accompanying - A villainous engraving, supposed to be tho lion, gentleman's portrait. The biography is very interesting

—evidently tho work -:>f a, local poet—-anti one can only regret that, from the limited circulation of the Town and Country Journal in New Zealand, few persons in the colony will have an opportunity of learning what a distinguished individual rules over us. The biography, by the ~"aJ T3 is given as that of one of " the Premiers of the Australian colonies,"

Mr. H. B. Roberts is on the tapis once more. To say that this is the hundredth clerk he has put through his hands would probably be near the truth, for we believe it is a part of the worthy gentleman's nature to fall out with every man who serves him. See that beautiful advertisement about the chocolate ! " Suspicion haunts the guilty breast," says the student of human nature,—but totally oblivious of apothegms, the old gentleman naively offers £5 to any person who will relieve him from the suspicions which haunt his breast (without the adjective, of course). Will no benevolent person assist to clear the fountain; to allow the perturbed waters of moral innocence to convoj' those foul elements which darken their pellucid purity, to Lethe's stream ? The chocolate is almost as serious as the cash-book ! Six sticks of chocolate gone, gone for ever, perhaps into the oesophagus of some dyspeptic. If six sticks of chocolate are equivalent to four turnips, a crime of darkest dye has been committed ;. for an old custom say 3 that a hungry man may take three turnips out of another's field without the law taking him; but not more. And how pathetic he is too. As the less luminary Mr Evans paled his light before the Mandy coruscation, so did Mr Symes's lustre become dim before the sun of Drury ! That letter to Major Edwards introducing the renowned law student, is a master-piece of confidential diplomacy. "My dear Major ! Mr. Drury, with whom I contemplate entering into a permanent arrangement," &c, &c. The Major must have felt deeply interested in the character of Mr Roberts's clerical assistance. Then the philanthropic address to Mr Drury— '' With a good feeling towards a stranger, I allowed you to take a seat in the office with a view to your future advancement." This is very fine. The services of Mr Symes (a respectable youth and the son of an esteemed pettier) had been dipensed with, and capital was made out of Mr Drury's testimonials, but the sequel is that Air R. expected to get that highly qualified gentleman for nothing. " You will please therefore seek another home !" Charming is this language. It shows a benevolence which we well might envy. The good Samaritan finds the accomplished law student in distress ("being a stranger, and subjected to great unpleasantness") and he takes him in, gives him " a home," introduces him to the society of tbe Resident Magistrate, flaunts his testimonials in the face of the Bench, makes him do the work of a Solicitor's Clerk, and—turns him out without so much as tbe scriptural tivopence! As the chocolate beats the cash-book, so the finale of Roberts cum Drury beats the chocolate; and the notorious Banaghcr has not a leg ief t to stand upon !

At a committee meeting of the Cricket Club held last evening, a challenge from Taranaki was received. The Wanganui Club expecting a visit from the Kelson cricketers this year, could not entertain the proposal, but deferred replying definitely until an answer was received from Nelson. The Nelson races, Colonial prize firing, and other matters, might po.sibly interfere with the visit from Nelson, and if so, the Wanganuites might find it practicable to accept the New Plymouth challenge.

The Wangaehu Bridge had a narrow escape from lire yesterday. A native crossing in the afternoon found a portion of tin! structure nearest the "Wangaehu Hotel iv dames, the fire rapidly extending by the assistance of a favorable wind. He immediately ran to the hotel, andgave the alarm. Fortunately several persons happened to be m the house at the time so that ma few moments all danger was everted by theiiprompt action. The discovery by the native was most opportune, as in a few minutes more the fire would have obtained such a hold, as to have endangered the whole bridge. No cause is assigned for tho ignition. The demand for tickets for the excursion trip has been exceedingly brisk all day, the attractions of the regatta week being sufficient to induce many to embark. The number of tickets left being very limited, we expect they will- bring a premium late this evening.

Wo observe by the late. Cape, papers that ' a notice has been issued, by order of tho Governor, for proposals from companies or individuals to construct a cable between the Cape and England.

Another assigned cause for the split in the Cabinet is that Mr Vogel sent instruction.-; to the AgeiU-GtMteral on his authority.

Emigration (says the Post) to Taranaki is proceeding on n largo scale. During- tho, course of a discission which recently took place between a deputation of Taranaki settlers and the Hon. Mr .McLean. MrT.lulke, linniio-i-ation Agent for the province.said he had received a letter that morning from Wellington, stating that six immigrants would leave England in the ship Forfarshire, and two had arrived by the coach the night previously. There is hope for Taranaki

In our advertising Column,? will be found an advertisement of a sale-, of imported rams by Mr W. Finnimore on Friday next the 7th in^t. Since the printing- of that portion of the paper, the date has been altered to Monday the 3.oth inst. We direct particular attention to the alteration.

The Melbourne correspondent of the Otago Daily Times given the following account of an exhibition of childish temper that tookplace over a dinner given co the delegates:—" We got pai-ticulnrs the other day of a ridiculous escapade of which Mr Parkes, Premier of New South Wales, was the hero. A Parliamentary banquet was given to them, and SirG-ewe Murray, President of the

legislative Council, took the chair. Mr Parkes, like an elderly lady, wanted to sit in the seat of honor on the chairman's right. The committee decided that as Mr Parkes was a member of Parliament, and not a guest, he could not have the first seat, which was awarded to Mr Francis, as the first representative of the Premier colony. Thereupon Mr Parkes like a.spoiled child, refused to come to the dinner."

The livening Post, after referring to a proposal made by the Government journals to impose aland tax, says:—" In pursuance of this project, the Independent attempts to prove that Mr Stafford and his party are the representatives of the large landholders, and the Government and its party are forsooth, rhe poor man's friend. Why if ever there was a Government representing the squatters, it is the present one. Mr Waterhouse is a large nmlmlder iv the Province: while Mr Vogel has been raised to power on theshouldersof the squatters. He fought for them in 0;ago through thick and thin, resisting every attempt to open up the Province to small cultivators, and has done so in the House of Representatives since he has been a member of the Government, as witness his fierce opposition to the Otago Hundreds Bill -.Mr M'Lean's lancl-slnu-king operations in Hawke's Bay are notorious; Mr B.ilhgate, although he got into the House by means of the anti-squatter party, betrave'd his constituents, and 'is at heart the squatters'friend: Mr Hall is a runholder himself, and all his interest are connected with the success of squatterdom; Mr Richardson is a successful contractor, and his interests are, like those of Mr Hall, bound up with the runholders ; while MiReynolds is intimately connected, with the Otago squatters, and has never pretended to be otherwise. Is it not preposterous to suppose that such a body of men can be favorable to an attack upon the large landholders of the Colony ? If they ostensibly made such an attack, it would he but a sham, snd a stalking horse for a genuine assault upon the working classes. MiStafford on the other hand, although a runholder himself, has shown a disposition to favor the settlement of small farmers. Why the scheme of colonization which he propounded at Timai-u, and which has been so much ridiculed by Mr Vogel and Mr Fox, had for its basis the establishment of small fai'iningeonniuuiities throughout the country. In Otago, between two and thaee years ago when Mr Vogel's dear friends, the runholders in that Province, were lighting tooth and nail to prevent the division of their runs, and the colonisation of the eountrv. Mr Stafford and Sir F. D. Bell voluntarily offered to give up a choice poi-tiou of thenrun for settlement. Mr Stafford has fought bard to pi-evem a monopoly of the land of the Colony, and in doing so, he has merely followed one of the guiding principles of his party]; whereas the members of the Government are not only personally concerned in sheltering large land holders from bear-in-* then- due share of the public burdens, but their chief supporters, such as Mr Fox and Mr Ormond, are equally bound up with the class. The Government are in this instance trying on the game which Mi- Vogel had regularly played since he got into office by seizing his opponent's policy, and usiti"- it for his own purposes. We da not think he will succeed on this occasion.'-'

Efforts are being made by the settlers in the Upper Matarawa district, to erect a school room. Mr John Old has kindly given a site, and headed the subscription with a donation of £5 towards the desirable object, Already some fifteen children-are under the caie of Mr Macormish, ;nd the number will be materially increased as soon a3 a suitable building is erected. A meeting will shortly be held tit which a commute will be appointed, to make all arrano-e----ments for the work, and for the- collection of the neees ary subscriptions. An 3' ondesirous of contributing towards ti.e erection of the school can leave their subscriptions at the office of this paper.

The election of auditors for tlie corporation took place to-day. Polling booths were fixed in each Ward. Shortly after 4 o'clock the return was made as follows : Queen's Cook's St'Johu's Total Wright ... 65 79 13 — 157 Churton ... 47 08 13 118 Lifhton ... 27 -ai. 3 _ 91 THE EDUCATIONAL RESERVE. The following letters on the above question were read at tho last meeting of tlie Council,.- — Suporintcm hart's Ofiico, Wellington, .Feb 18, 1873. Sni, — Referring to a, memorial forwarded by you from, tlie inhabitants of Wanganui, relative to a certain, educational reserve, I have now the honor to enclose, copy of letter I ha\e received from the Hon. the Colonial Secretary on the subject, for the information of the memorialists. .1. have the honor to be, Sir, Your Obedt. Srvt.,

William Fitzi-ierbert, w rr __ Superintendent, W. H. Watt, Esq., Mayor, Wanganui. Colonial Secretary's Office, Wellington,

31st January, 1873. -. to your letter" of the ord ox April last, in which you enclose the copy of a memorial from certain of the inhabitants of Wanganui, who desire that the Grant of two hundred and fifty acres of land adjoining that town, in trust, to the Bishop of New Zealand as an endowment for- the uses of an Industrial j bchool should be cancelled, on the ground that the trust on which the land was granted has not been properly earned out; ana 111 which letter you request that the opinion of the Attorney-General should be taken as to the best means to be adopted 111 order to carry out the wishes of the memorialists, I beg to inform y olir Honor that the subject has been referred as you requested ior the opinion of the Attorney General lnat opinion has now been received, and v to the effect that, the proper course for those persons to take who believe that the school has not been, or is not being, conducted 111 conformity with the conditions of the trust upon which the land was granted, is to commence a suit by writ in I the bupreme Court, in the name of the Attorney-General, with his leave in I which suit they will be relators. | The question is one in which the Govrnment do not consider it to be within i their province to interfere. I have, itc., (SS'tL) JohxHall.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Herald. SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1873., Wanganui Herald, Volume V, Issue 1730, 1 March 1873

Word Count
2,378

The Evening Herald. SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1873. Wanganui Herald, Volume V, Issue 1730, 1 March 1873

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