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West Coast Times WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 1904.

THE ST LOUIS EXHIBITION.

On April 30th tbe long expected and much discussed Exposition at St Louis, which marks an era in the progress of America, and also signalises the advancement of the arts and sciences throughout the world, was formally opened by the high officers of tbe Exposition and by the notable statesmen ot America. The actual ceremony or Bignal of inaugura* tion was given by President Roosevelt at the White House, Washington, In the presence of tbe ambassadors from foreign countries and the statesmen and high officials of the United Statea, the President pressed a gold key which released the water in tbe cascades on the Exposition grounds, seven or eight hundred miles away, and countless columns of water ascended before the eyes of a multitude of 150,000 people. At the same moment the 40,000 horsepower machinery of the Exposition was set in motion, the flags were unfurled at all points, salutes were fired, and the great Louisana Pur« chase Exposition, or as it will be better known, the St Louis Exhibition was formally opened. The gigantic international exhibition is essentially a product of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It is an adjunct of our complex and ever advancing civilisation. The march of intellect is universal and all nations progressing as they do in every department of science, art and commerce — though each following out its own school of thought — the only medium of effective comparison is by means of the great world's fair. At each succeeding exhibition, and notably the most modern ones at Chicago, Paris and St Louis, the organisers have outvied with each other in gathering together the products of the later civilisation and it is claimed for the present American Exposition that it outrivals all previous efforts in this respect. The accounts publiehed from time to time of the great St Louis Fair, indicate that it comprises a small world of wonders. The opening ceremony both at Washington and St Louis was exceedingly imposing. The inaugurating speeches were, many of them, triumphs of oratory, especially that delivered by tbe American President. In pointing out the object and scope of the Exposition, President Roosevelt eaid :— This Exposition is one primarily intended to show the progress in tbe industry, the science and the art not only of the American nation, bufc of all other nations in the great and wondeiful century that has just closed. Every department of human activity will be represented there, and perhaps I may be allowed, as honorary President of the Athletic Association which, under European management, started to revive the memory of the Olympic games, to say that I am glad that in addition to paying proper heed to the progress of industry- of science, of art, we have also paid proper heed to the development of the athletic pastimss, which are useful in themselves, which are useful as showing that ib is «vise tor nations to be be abl a to relax as well as work.

The full text of tbe President's address will be well worth reading aud the detailed account of tbe whole proceedings will be awaited with interest. It is more tban prcbable that so gigantic an undertaking as the St Louis Exhibition will result in a deficit, as so many other large exhibitions have done, but that aspect to a wealthy country like America will be of little account. The indirect benefit to the nation will more tl.an compensate

for any loas, and no doubt that is the view that will most directly apppal to the Americans.

The Women's Benevolent Society meets this afternoon at 3 o'clock.

The ordinary meeting of the Westland County Council takes place to-day at 2 p.m.

A rreeting of the trustees of the Hokitika Saving's Bank will be held on Friday next at 4 p.m.

We understand it is the intention of the ','Twelftb Ni^ht" company bo play in Greymoutb next Wednesday evening.

The price of flour in Wellington hag dropped to £8 f.o.b. A.t Timaru and Dunedin a fall of 10a has taken place.

Tenders are invited by the Railway Department for the supply and delivery of sleepers in any quantity, Full particulars are given elsewhere.

The ordinary monthly meeting of tbe Lodge Westland Kilwinning will be held this evening at 7 .30 o'clock. All brethren are cordially invited to attend.

The members of the Hospital Board met at a special meeting last evening and immediately went into committee to consider the by-laws, which were finally approved of.

The Purvey Department continues to open up and develop the rural lands of Westland. The last Gazette contains notices of areas thrown open for selection on lease in perpetuity in Kanieri and South Westland.

Mr W A Jones, Chief Accountant, at the head office of the Australian Widow's Fund Life Insurance Office, Wellington, arrived here last evening. He is making a tour of the Coast on business connected with bis office.

In regard to the export of coal from the Coal Creek State coal mine, it is understood that the output at present is somewhat restricted through inability to charter the necessary steamers. This difficulty, of course, is only temporary, and should not effect the export after a week or to. A trial of the coal will be made by tbe warship Psyche on the 14th inst.

The talented company of Kanieri Amateurs who have on several occasions given entertainments there in aid of the Westland Hospital have generously consented to give one of their popular performances in Hokitika in aid of the institution at an early date, The reputation of the performers as well as the worthness of the object should ensure a crowded house on the occasion.

There was a good attendance at tbe usual weekly meeting of the Catholic Literary and Debating Society last even ing at St Mary's Schoolrom, the President, Mr Sellers, senr, being in the chair. The subject debated was "Should tbe Number of Hotel Licenses be reduced, and after a very interesting discussion a vote was taken, with the result that both bides received equal support.

The complimentary social to the ladies and gentlemen who took part in tbe performance of "Twelfth Night," which is being given by the Aquatic and Cycling Club at their Gibson's Quay rooms this evening promises to be an unqualified success. Members of the Club and their hdy friends are invited, and the gathering is likely to be a large one. The cost will be borne by a small levy on members. That the social will prove an enjoyable one goes without saying.

A protracted discussion took place at the meeting of the Charitable Aid Board 3este.rday as to the resignations of "the Wardsman and Matron of the Totara Hospital, Mr and Mrs Misson. The highest encomiums were passed on the services of Mr and Mrs MiSsen, and the severance of their connection with the institution was commented on with regret Ultimately it was decided to suspend acceptance of their resignation, pending enquiries as to tbe cause.

Mr Chas M'Mahon, who is directing the tour of Dixs new Gaiety Company, intends opening here in the Princess Theatre on Monday and Tuesday next, the 13th and 14th inst. The company is credited wifch being one of $he brightest musical comedy combinations which have visited the Coast for many years. Included in the company are the Delevals. two of tbe most remarkable trick cyclists ia the world, Kellman, the musician, Oarleton and Cowan, comedian?, and a number of very clever variety artistes.

We trust to see a numerous and rcprepentftuve gatharing of ladies present at the Town Hall this afternoon in response to the invitationn of flis Worship the Mayor to organise a local fund in aid of the sufferers by the Brunner disaster. The very f^d surroundings of the calamity must appeal to all hearts, and a fund to reinstate the homeless and bereavtd ones is a most worthy object. As we have previously stated we feel sure the natural generosity of the people of this district will nob need 'any stimulus in such a cause.

Several cases of obstruction of pubic thoroughfares came before the Magistrate's Court yesterday morning, Mr Day, S.M, presiding. The charges were brought under tbe Police Offences Act as follows : —Police v T Stopforth for having left a waggon and three carts in a public street. Accused who pleaded guilty was con rioted and discharged. M M'Grath, who was represented bj Mr Beare, pleaded "not guilty," to having left one dray in the street, stating that another person had left in it front of his premises. The charge was dismissed. W Keller was charged with leaviug four barrels in Weld Street. He pleaded "guilty" and was convicted and discharged.

Tbe monthly meeting of the Hakitika Workers' Union was held last night, a good number of members being' present. Tbe statement of receipts and expenditure for the first month was presented, which showed a substantial balance to- the fund, and, in view of the present state of labour in the district, this must be considered very satisfactory. One new member was proposed. The certificate of the registration of the Union was received from the Registrar-General. Tuesday, the 21st inftt, was the date fixed for the next meeting. It' was stated that the Union was likely to be considerably strengthened by the acquisition of a contingent of country members and several local men engaged in various trades in the town.

The Menticultural Society met last evening, when a triangular debate was held on the question " Which Commands the Greatest Influence in the World — Pulpit, Press or Platform ?" The issues ware championed by the Rev W. J. Elliott, Messrs Moss and Hills respectively. The speakers acquitted themselves very creditably and at the conclusion were awarded a vote of thanks. A ballot was taken, resulting in a victory for the platform. Mr F. Angel was in the chair.

A very odd theft was committed in Auckland the other day, when a House was entered during the temporary absence of Ihe occupants and the kitchen stove was removed. The stove was a new one and was not set in, but was so heavy that two men were required to lift it. Very considerately, so as not to put the owner to too much trouble, the visitors left an old stove in its place, so- that the family did not need to go breakfastleaß next morning. The owner of the house was only absent a couple of hours and returned before 10 p.m., so that the transferees must have been pretty quick about mak-

ing the exchange.

At tbe ordinary meeting of the Harbour Board last evening. Mr Toomey, aB a member of the Public Works Committee, reported that the repairs to tbe wharf had been carried on in a a. very satisfactory manner and were now nna'ring completion, being expected to be finished in two or three days. It was stated that the work would cost £184, and the timber was estimated to cost about £70. A discussion took pla-e as to the overtaxing of the wharf to a dangerous extent with timber, and tbe Ha bourmaster was empowered to stop tbe placing of timber on the wharf when be considered shippers were going beyond the point of safety.

The monthly meeting of the Westland Acclimatisation Society was held at tbe County Chambers last evening, the Rev H G Hawkins (chair), Drs Teichelmann and Macandrew, Messrs Park, A B King, Linnemann, M'lntosh, J King, Rentofa, Mahan and Moore being present. Tbe absence of Messrs Prebton and J Lloyd was apologised for. The usual routine business was transacted. It was resolved to have all the ponds at the Hatchery covered with wire netting. . The matter of sending ova to South Westland was left to the Chairman, Secretary and Mr Park to deal with. Messrs M'lntosh and Evans were appointed visitors to ihe Hatchery for the month.

All old residents of the distiict will bear with regret of the death of Mr G. G. Fitzgerald, who was formerly well known on the West Coast. News of his death was telegraphed through from Timaru yesterday, he having resided there and been editor of the Timaru Herald since 1885. The late Mr Fitzgerald was the Parliamentary representative of this con-, stituency from 1881 to 1884, being defeated then by Mr John Bevan, He was Magistrate and Warden at Hokitika for years, and hia great ability was generally recognised, as it has since been, in the journalistic profession, The deceased gentleman, who was seventy yean of age at the time of his death, was a brother of the late Mr James Edward Fitzgerald, formerly Comptroller and Auditor General.

A sordid case of destitution was brought under the notice of the Charitable Aid Board at the meeting yesterday by one of tbe members, who was at a loss to know bow it should be dealt with. He stated that he was drawing pension money for an elderly woman at Kanieri, who had a young family and a grown up Fon of about fifteen years of age. Instead ot being of assistance, this hopeful youth dissipated all the money he could get hold of, and the member told the Board that one day when he had paid the old woman thirty shillings the son took it from her forcibly. The members'' of the Board were of opinion that he should have strong punishment meted out to him. Ultimately it was decided to refer the case tc the police, as the family going begging around were a nuisance to the district.

The subscription list to the second W estland Industrial Building Society is now nearly closed and those intending to become shareholders will need to make early application; As some misapprehension has existed as to the drawing under the rules of the new Society, we may be permitted to explain the process. In the first Society the rraibles planed in the box were for single hundreds. Under the new Society's rules they are in groups of three hundred. A person holding three shares will have the privilege of drawing three hundred pounds, but if only the holder of one share he will be bracketed with two otjhers and will draw his hundred pounds jrst tbe same. The marbles put in tbe ballot box will represent in every case a group of three Bhares, and it does not matter to the shareholder whether he porsesses one, two or threp abare?, he will draw according to the value of his investme t. Some donkors spend a life-time

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT19040608.2.8

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 1904., West Coast Times, Issue 13232, 8 June 1904

Word Count
2,433

West Coast Times WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 1904. West Coast Times, Issue 13232, 8 June 1904

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