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Wt&t ®fl»si 'iiimtj » MONDAY, APRIL 26, 1897.

The contest' for the Suburbs election has been very 'severe one, and • although the $pver»ineDt have agsin succeeded in. getting their man in, the majority s was such a narrow one as to leave them no subject for f elioitatidns, except it be the bare fact f that they hav.e ggt one more^fajthfu^pllower to vote for them. The majority for Mr Witford at th 1 c general, elections was 252, th^ voting on, that occasion being :--T. ])1. Wilford (Government) 2194 ; T. W, Hislop' {Opposition) - 1942. The (figures on Fti^aj,' stood— W^qn (Govt.] ■2D36 ; Atkinson. (Opposition)* 1897, majority 1 for^Wilspn 139; Tile i Go'vern|men|maio.4tjUn'ito/§uburbs district has thus been reducedby : l 13 votes in the few months "' and this notwithstanding" the fact .that three; Ministers, (including the Premier and the Acting-Premier) besides two of the members from Wellington, have been stumping the electorate in the interests of Mr Wilson, whilst Mr Atkinson carried on. the fight singlehanded From the returns telegraphed it would seem that 3933 votes were, recorded as against 4136 in becember of, last year. , On , that occasion' there were- 5594 names on the roll,' so fully a fifth did not f ' record their votes. The present roll w.ould be much smaller because those who did, not vote' on the last occasion would have .their names struck off when the newjroll was being'compiled." Having these facts in.view it would seem that the relative voting was much stronger on Friday when comparedwith' the number of votes on the roll, although the actual number of votes polled was less. Th 6 Government candidate, Mr Wilson, received 158 less votes than did Mr Wilford, whilst Mr Atkinson received 45 less than did Mr Hislop. The diminished majority' sho^s how steadily : the Government^ majority is, being reduced and how surely the reaction aga,vist political and adinmistratiye corruption ia set-ting-in. The Government will, nb doubt, claim the result as a victory^ but' it does not take' many 1 viotories to produce a defeat. Inone'o| hj^' glatform utter-, 'ancea on behalf- of 'Mr Wilson the Premier is t rep6r)i;ed to h^ve sai^itnaVthough'exr cepiiion had been raisedto public'servants ' takißgany'part'in the'.electipri f , he wa^ proud to see they had the courage to show theitcolo'uif. We are not surpris&dat 1 sueh 1 an expression. frQm such a source, but we cannot ignore the" inevitable' 'tendency of such a course. Even in the United States of America, a country whose political life we usually regard as something to be avoided, no such thing us interference by public servants in political con-

, tests is $ole.rated, whilst in the neighboring colonies and in the Mother Country such action would- ab once cause the dismissal of j;he offending person. So it would be in this colony if the public ,ser : vant were of the wrong colour. It is the tint that decides whether an action is righ.t or wrong. If of the color of the great sham-liberal party there is no offence in doing their best for a candidate, even at the neglect of duties for which they arft paid by the.taxpayeis. but should the political partisan be on the other side it will soon be found that his services can be dispensed with, or that a less important position would, .be ,m ( ore, suitable, to, .his capacity. At ,the genera] elections public servants were extensively used as canvassing agents, it being a portion of the policy of sham-liberalism to make the ie seryicg of the country a ,vast political machine to keep a set of men in power.

— A very successful social was held in .thy schoolroom at Goldsborough on Wednesday eyeniug, many people from both, Stafford' and 1 (Goldsborough asseniblying to say good-bye to Miss Martin, the late assistant mistress of the school. A very valuable presentation was made on ttehalf of the scholars and public, and asnicely prepared address was read by Miss K. Gardiner. Mr M'Whirter, the Chairman qi the local School Committee, as also. -of the Board of Education, in well chosen words traced Miss Martinis. iazaer,L eula--gised her services, and wished her a prosperous and happy future. I Meetings of householders will be held throughput th.e.]dis£ric,t-;ijbis iqvening for the purpose'cjf'eiec^ipgjsch'ool committees for the ensuing 12 months. At man: aamed^BrenryiDiawr^ce was ar-rested'-afe JEeef'toa'^E.'ilaurriday- evenings on the serious charge of threatening to murder, and the circumstances point very strongly that it was no _ idle threat, but > accompanied, by a de]^b9ratev,,intent pp carry out hia. express'e'ip jjiirpose. f\, appears (says the' (Herald) that down, from Bilk's t iPoiup^dnj company with a" y.oung\ man]... named,,.- Doonan, the accused \ in parting with his company, took' his leave saying that he would meet him again in the evening if he were alive. Subsequently, lie purchased' a revolver and cartridges at Messrs Forsyth and Masters' ironmongery warehouse, and later proceeded to the Exchange Hotel, where, his .wife is7engagedj as^cook.' 1 'Be was met by-j Me KaAer£ -ioi whom he expressed his determination to shoot his wife, and la&temjifced -±o.forc3<his-way» ifo the kitchen. This was • resisted, and he then threatened banfihobcMr Kater« The police -weneioixoußse communicated- with, an information 1 wasl laid,) and Eawrence was: arrested,, needless to -.say to the intense relief of all concerned. .

Says Ci vis in the Otagp Witness : It is- a moot point ty'hether.an honor or the reverse' Has" been done to the memory of Mr ( Ballance, by (i erepting a statue to him in' J the grounds:' of. 'Parliament House. ( As. a., work of art the statue, isTislightingly' spoken of, and there is : the usual- "deficiency in the balance sheet. Mr Ballance is more fortunate in one respect than Burns, whose Dunedin. statue was detained , ; in .pawn unMl the. artist. was besides 1 , .the inscription is about as senseless and unmeaning as anything that could possibly emanate from the > brain of a> politU cal crank. The information that Mr Ballance "loved the people" will be afoou^as interesting to posterity as' the circumstance that Mr Ballanca had corns, qr thas,he was particularly partial fco.chops and,.t9matojsauc.e,,*-, If ,the inscription had named one single thing he did for the pjeople, it, would have been different-.. The author of the jargon-was .evidently unaware that he was' casting a slur on the present generation, for. \\xq > ..implication is that love for the ( people is such a rare thing'thai? we give- 'Statues' to those who possess it. A politician's love for the people is akin to that' of a cannibal for missionary,, ou-ihat c£- a bba-c'onsferictor which embraces its victim for the purpose of making: ifr more easy of ; deglutition. Was it not a member of the female bodyguard of one of the early Georges who called ■ out , to. the ■raurjn-uring- crowd : ", Mine fronts, v.c haf com^for goots — for, all your goots !" " Yes $md our chattels too," repljed.fysurly proletarian. „ The Taranaki Herald has the f ollow-ing!;T-The, Advanced Woman- would have been at home in Liardet-street school last Monday^ night,; to have seen about <30 ortf.Q o£. her. sisters seated at ' well-fur-nished and beautifully adorned tea-tables-prepared entirely by the gentlemen, who, dresseddn cap'andi apron,' -took command^ and waited upon the desires of their su-> periors. But, as- one might • expect, the men had the best of it, for nosooner had I they cleared away the tables than they I put aside Mary Jane's apron and informed the-ladies-they were stuck for a sum of £200 in their estimate for building the new church-, and pathetically appealed v t6 them for help. The ladies • were " done brown," as the little boy says, and could not for shame refuse. They,, ho.wever, turned out the men for half' an hour, at the end- 'of -which- time they summoned them to return, and informed them with much grace that they had resolved to; try: and raise this £200, and had agreed^ that fpr that .e^ud^hey would hold anvJndustrial and,,, Art .Exhibition, accompanied with a sale 6tw.prk, in the month o£,Qc,tjober next' .Tlje men went home an^' slept well. The" women are now" at ' work. Some experiments., made at the engineerings laboratory of the University ofi Michigan to determine the strengths of. welded joints are especially interesting, (says* the Digest of Physical Tests ) ' Of a number of the specimens tested not ione broke, in the w,eld 5 as some ,of thes,e 'were slightly' larger at the weld, anew 'set, of specimens was prepared and a^cut taken, from each in the laths to r^duc f ,the piece" to a uniform d^ame^v'thxougn'ouii its length between the jaws of the testing mach|ne. Common' ro ! undjiipn tt was used. Tnr'ee bars were taken at random, .ljin., lin., and fin, in- diameter. From ,each bar four specimiens ' were prepared, 'one solid; one lap .weeded, one butt welded, and one split^weltfed^ Ther.e^ 'suits show'that only two specimens, bot"h lap welded, broke at, or near the weld'; the fracture, in., one case was slightly crystalline and in the other fibrous. The strength in no case de parted widely from the strength of the solid parts. It would seem from these tests that with skillfully made welds we may expjcfc tr> i - oiliz3 nearly the full strength of the oi^irul bar. ,

The Inangahua Times says: It has never been disputed that " moths " have a propensity for fluttering round candles, and getting their wings singed thereby, but it is something new to hear of " moths " fluttering round blossoms, and being-lured to their own destruction in thepiocess. Mr B. Smith, gardener of this town, is the successful cultivator of what, in the absence of any botanical name, he calls the " Godliu moth plant." It acts as a snare to attract the moth, either by its perfume or some peculiar essence contained in the flowers, which are small and bell shaped. The foliage of the plant. resembles that of thti 'cltemsfcls, long narrow, and' pointed and of a dull green shade. Directly the moth entdrs the flower the petals contract at the top, and the entrance thus becoming hermetically .sealed; the insect is imprisoned without atty chance of escape. The plant is a very ' f lee climber and is covered with countless "clusters of creamy white blossom, which, give it a highly ornamental appearance so that it would not only be invaluable to , orchard owners but also an attractive ac quiaition to any garden. Plantediin the (Vicinity, of fruit trees infectedi by thecodn lin moth, one can readily understand the benefits to be derived from its cultivation. We are 1 not aware whether the plant j. is indigenous to Reef ton, or whether it has been introduced from other places. In' either case Mi Sinifh deserves tho thanks ofifruit groweis and should be able to turn his discovery i ton profitable' account, that is if the plant possesses the inveigling propertieahe claims for it.

_ A Blenheim debating society recently discussed the question, ''Is it wrong to cheat a lawyer ?" It was decided that it jwp&'jnot wrong, but that it was impossible. i . In-view. of' theapproaching"chrysantthemum show intending exhibitors are generally bestirring themselves, and it would appear that the Battle of the Flowers next week will „be on record lines — as shouldbe'fit'tiugly the case in this record yeaK. The .exhibitors of last iy,ear will be supplemented by several additional exhi-bitorsj-arid some excellent ; flowers' are promised-.,; (; In connection with ithe Show a reminder is given of the classes specially open to exhibitors who have never won a prize, for Chrysanthemums, •and whjch should draw forth good competition. The ladies are also reminded of the; classes for table decorations i-abd'. trophies of the prizes for which will be docidsd by,- then popular; vote of the visitors to the exhibition ; also of the bouquets and baskets of the floral queen. Special, attention is,,alsp^ directed to the class'of' late fruits— apples pears and quinces and the' fruit design or decoration. .With so much variety the show should be a distinct success.

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Wt&t ®fl»si 'iiimtj » MONDAY, APRIL 26, 1897., West Coast Times, Issue 10553, 26 April 1897

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Wt&t ®fl»si 'iiimtj » MONDAY, APRIL 26, 1897. West Coast Times, Issue 10553, 26 April 1897

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