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West Coast Times. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1896

The announcement that Mr Grimmond Had been nomiria'te'd as a candidate {<* con- ! test this constituency seems to have come as it Surprise bo some people but why this should be so is not made apparout. Some five or six months ago Mr Grimraond announced his intention of peeking reelection, aud it is quite two months since bo requested us to announce his candidature. There has been no expression on his pilrt to cause anyone to suppose he had altered his mind and his name has been included in the list published by the principal papers throughout the Colony — Ministerial and Opposition — as one of the candidates who would oppose the present There are some, perhaps, who affected to regard these announcements lightly, men who did not ! recognise his steadfastness of purpose and sense of public duty. The reasons for his candidature require little comment from us. When he contested the election with Mr Seddon six years ago he was the sitting member for the larger and most populous portion of the district,'and he sought re-election. There was not, at the time, much difference in the political views of the two candidates, excepting chat Mr Grimmond was a free trader and Mr Seddon a protectionist. The contest was a personal one between the two and the candidate having the largest personal support gained the day. At the general elections, three years ago, Mr Grlmiiiond was visited with an affliction which terminated in the death of his wife, a lady whose loss evoked the heartfelt sorrow and sympathy of the entire district. It woiild have been impossible for him, therefore, to have contested 'the election of 1893 had he desired to do so. At that time, also, there was a general feeling that as Mr Seddon had just assuriied the Premier'sliip he should be given a free hand to establish his policy aud prove his worthiness for the position Those conditions do not now obtain, Mr Seddon's wanton abuse of power and determined efforts to subvert the freedom j of the people have created in many minds an intense anxiety lest bur liberties and rights should be seriously endangered and Mr Grimmond has manfully come forward in the people's cause. Even his strongest opponents cannot help admiring his pluck and determination. He comes forward to fight the battle of the people against overwhelming odds. He finds arrayed against him all the forces of wealth and position scores of loud voiced coinmitteenien and all the influences which a corrupt administration of Government expenditure is able to exercise. He is fighting the battle of the people, almost single handed, and with only a few to stand by his side against all the power which a Premier of the colony is able to exercise. All honor to him for it. Efkouts have beeu attempted, in comparing the two candidates for this constituency, to reflect on the personal fitness of Mr Grimmond. Those who do so have taken very little trouble to avail themselves of the knowledge within their reach. Tftat Mr Seddon is the strongest man on the platform we will readily admit, but when we have said tliis we reach t^e fullest extent of his superiority. He is a very wily tactician aud succeeded in getting so many written pledge's of support from struggling and not over confident candidates who afterwards became elected that his positi6n as Premier was assured. Of his administration very few of his strongest supporters can cite instances in his favor. As Minister of .Mities lie appeared to consider it his chief duty to reprove those who wished to see mining become a prosperous industry, as witness his attitude in reference to the Back Creek water supply question.- As Minister of Public Works he chiefly became noted as the initiator 6f the corrnpt co-operative system of public works under which mon have to go as beggars to the police camp or exercise political influence before they can get work. He has hud eharge*of all the public departments in turn but we have not learnt that he has distinguished himself in any of them, hib administration all through being marked by the one tendency — to increase his political power. In Westland, we have had ample opportunities for comparing the two men, because they have both held positions on our public bodies. In these Mr Grimmond invariably pToved himself the abler man of the two. He was much tb n better administrator and never stooped to the thousand and one practices which caused Mr |,Seddon's public actions to be regarded with suspicion, in other parts of the Colony the burly form and ringing voice of the Premier carry a distinction ■, which is somewhat obscured in Westland, I amongst the people who remdmbei 1 many incidents of the past. i

. . 1 Wo expected many things from Mr Urinimond's candidature, but least of all that it would, so soon too, drive his op- i ponenr to a lunatic asylum. Yet it up I pe;mi to bo so. Mr Sotklon is reported to 1 have wired to his local organ on Saturday, t

and it is noticeable that tbe telegram is dated from Seacliffc, which is, as our readers are aware, synonymous with Sea View in Westland. What glres color to th"-s regrettable aspect is the wording oii j the unfortunate telegram — " Must fight |to the death." No man in his sane senses, ! and particularly; p. Premier, would pen such utter twaddle. We hope that "the sentence we have quoted is not an iustrucI tion to^tlie editorial WE, because it would ! -io generally regretted were he to, carry ; fc nut to th? letter. Perhaps the local police will keep their eye on the actions of our friends because already there is a a strangeness in his manner. A largely attended meeting of Mr Seddon's supporters was Heltf. in Town Hall on Saturday evening when a general committee was formed, Mr James Holmes being appointed chairman and Mr J. R. Hudson secretary. There was also a meeting at Rimu and a large committee formed. A meeting of the .general committee will |be held in Mr Holmes' shop this evening when all desirous of joining tHe committee are invited to be present' A meeting of women electors, supporters of Mr Seddon,»k convened for Tuesday ;if ternoon. in the T,own Hall, at 3 o'clock for the purpose of meeting Mrs Seddon and forming a committee. The Gymkhana sports on Wednesday should pass 6fE very successfully. A pleasing feature will be the May-pole dance and Crowning of the May Queen. The entertainment in the evening is sure t6 attract a large audience, as it will be in etery way a capital one. Reports from Greymouth goto show that the reheaisxls have been most successful, and our neighbouring friends who are kindly giving the entertainment should be warmly welcomed. The joint committee of the Boating and Crickeb Clubs promoting the gymkhana form a working bee on Cass Square at 6.30 o'clock this evening. A meeting of the Goldmining League was held in the Town Hall on Saturday evening, Mr James Park, president, ia the Chair. Only a few members were present. After discussion a resolution approving the proposed constitution of the Mining Council was carried, an amendment that all the bodies mentioned ssnd delegates to a conference to decide upon the representation beinp negatived, whilst a further amendment that consideration of the whole mattet be postponed lapsed for want of a seconder. Messrs Park, Grimmbnd and Smyth were appointed to rep'reserit the League on the Mining Council, the secretary to write to the other bodies and arrange for the first meeting of the Council. The cricket match played at Greymouth on Saturday between Grey end Hokitika teams resulted in a win for the home team by an innings and 69 runs. Grey scored 159. Boddington, 71; Knell, 27; Chalk, (frot out) 13. Hokitika, 38 and 52. Ingram, W. Sherman and Byrne 10 each. A sad accident occurred at the' Shamrock claim, Addison's. on Tuesday eveniijg, resulting in the .death of Fredrick Ericksen, a miner engaged in the mine, lie was (says the Westport News) eiaga'ged at work in a tunnel, but neglected to put in timber, when a fall of earth, about half a ton in weight, came down, killing him instantly. The body was dug out; with all possible speed, when it was found that the head and body were criished. An inquest was held on the remains at Mr P. M'Enroe's hotel yesterday, before Mr Win. Gothard, J.P., ActingiOoroner. After hearing the evidence, the jury returned a vordioi, of "Accidentally killed," but no blamo was due to the management. The deceased was a resident of Addison's for over two years, and wa's greatly 3'espected.- He waa 28 years of age His father was at ouc time assistant keeper at the Cape Foul wind lighthouse, but is now in charge at the Dog Island lighthouse. A relative of the deceased will arrive to-day, from Nelson to make arrangoments for the burial. The Liverpool steamer Etolia, with passengers and 300 head of cattle from Montreal to Bristol, ran into an iceberg, a'nu about 300 tons of ice ifi huge pieces came crushing down on board. Fortunately, most of it rebounded into the seti, and some 40 or 50 tons remained on the ship's deck. The ship vibrated from steftn to stern, the bows were smashe.d in,, and orders were given to clear away the boats in case of the ship going down | The only leakage, htfwevei 1 , was found in the forep'eak, and for 36 hours the Etolia lay without a movement of the engines | except a touch ah<?nd or astern to clear an iceberg. A wooden bulkhead was constructed against the broken plate?, and the ice was cleared from the deck | and the forecastle head. Captain Evans j decided to continue his voyage, and brought his ship, passeugcrs", crew, and cattle safely into Bristol. Dr. Benjamin Ward Richardson, whose dearth is announced by a cable message published recently was in his GBth year. The deceased had a brilliant career as a metiical man, and was also widely known as & writer on subjects more or less connected with his profession. As a champic/n of temperance his name had become almost a housdliold word. Dr Richardson's most recent researches had boen directed to the study of diseases incidental to modern civilisation, the results of his observations, being published in a Quarterly called called the Asclepiad.

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Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1896, West Coast Times, Issue 10423, 30 November 1896

Word Count
1,751

West Coast Times. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1896 West Coast Times, Issue 10423, 30 November 1896

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