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TOPICS OF THE DAY.

[Star Lonuon Correspondent.]

London, June 15. Tbe announcement tbat the mucb-talked-of and lons-anticipated Jubilee procession would after all only be tho semi State affair usually associated with the opening of Parliament, caused so much grumbling and disappointment tbat strong representations were made to the Queen on tnat point, and it was yesterday announced that— nomnilly at least — full State will be observed. Instead of six cream coloed ponies eight are now to <sraw the Royal coach, and on arrival at Weitnainster Her Majesty has graciously promised to don crown and regal robes within full new cf the assembled thousands. These concessions are much appreciated, and will materially increato tbe heartiness of the popular coDgratula* tions, which might otherwise have been more jubilant than joyful. One thing more, however, is still wanted. People are on all sides asking with what aot of charitable amnificeuce does the Queen herself mean to mark the Jubilee. Surely, where all sortn and conditions of her aubjtcts are doing so much, the first lady in the land will not be found wanting.

THE ILLUMINATIONS.

The illuminations on Jubilee i night will be the most complete and brilliant ever known in this or aay other metropolis. A spirit of emulation is a broad at the West End, and tho leading noblemen, olubs, and tradesfolk are spending thousands of pcunds out-doing one another in transparencies and electric light. The great bouses of the Rothschilds, Cavendishes* anl Or aits, in Piccadilly, and of other great magnates in Btl^rave square, will simply blaze with brightness, and so ia a lesser decree will eraalior thoroughfares, if i he suggestion is carried out that householders piacs a candle in every window pane. SEATS TO VIEW THE PKOCEBSION — JOBILEE

PHIOES.

Tradesmen and householders with, windo a s to let on the line of the Jubilee procession ate making a rich harvest out of the popular furore. A single seat in Piccadilly costs from two guineas to three

guineas, according to position ,• whilst fo rooms on first floors fifty guineas is th< current quotation. The old Nationa Liberal Club, which commands a splendic tlew of both Charing Cross and Nortbum berland avenue, it is lettings its windows at so many pounds per foot One room has been taken at £65, another at £55, several at twenty guineas, and so on. THE EOITOBIAL CHAIR OP THE DAILY HEWS. Mr H. W. Lucy having failed to revivify the declining fortunes of the Daily News, has, after rather more than twelve months trial, been politely requested to evacuate the editorial chair. He will be succeeded by Mr J. E. Robinson, for many years general manager of the same paper. Mr Robinson is a very clever man ; indeed, it was to bis acumen the Daily News owed its big hit during the Franco-Prussian war. He not merely engaged Archibald Forbes, but authorised the substitution of tele* graphic for written correspondence — a tremendous revolution. The great Sala has quarrelled with Mr Ingram, of the Illustrated London News, and transferred his Echoes of the Week to a new and not specially brilliant periodical called the Entertainment Gazette. Finaucial difficulties caused ike rupture. THE NBW COINAGE. Though the new coinage is nominally to be issued next month, the amount sent'ont by the Bank of England will be so small ttiat for some time the Jubilee dollars, &c, should be valuable enrio?. In connection with the gold five-pound piece, it may be j stated that it was never intended for circulation, and will only be obtainable under certain restrictions. THE QUBE«'s PRESENTS. At Windsor just now no less than four secretaries are kept busily employed acknowledging in set terms the Jubilee presents forwarded to her Majesty. Some of these are most beautiful and valuable, others mere indications of the senders' vanity. What, for example, is one to think of the Mayor of a certain up-country town in New South Wales, whoee Jubilee gift to the Queen has taken the form of an album containing portraits of himself, his wife, and his brother councillors ! THE QUEEN'S GABDEN PARTY. The most elaborate preparations are in progress at Buckingham Palace for tbe Jubi'ee Garden Party, Upwards of 8000 invitations have been issued, so that the crowd will be prodigious ; and if by any chance it should be wet — well, imagination fails to picture the scene. To-night the Reform Club will for the first time lor half a century open its stately portals to London Society, The Prince and Princess of Wales, with a host of foreign potentate?, and most members of her Majesty's (Conservative) Government, are lo be present, and a card of invitation is worth its weight in gold. THE LASGWOEXHY MABBIAGE. Mr Stead's •• strange, true story " of the Langworthy marriage has been published in brochure form, with a portrait of tne much injured heroine as frontispiece, and is selling in thousands. Judging her by this photo, Mrs Lacgworthy does not look a very likely person to have been what common folk call " put upon." She seems particularly alert and wideawake, and has a wild-cat kind of expression that bodes ill for her loving spouse when at last she gets the best of him. I may tell you, by the way, that outside Northumberland street those who know most about the Langwortby case aver it was a case of (8e& fourth page,)

** di&tadad dat diamond ** beUVsefi hUokud nod wife. Tbey say that from tho first the lady was perfectly well aware that Langworthy did not intend to muko her hiß lawful wife, but she bad faith m her ability to circumvent bis designs. At Brussels wheu 'ho ceremony was performed by the cbtpl un to tbe Consulate, she thought be haJ really married her, ■ and no doubt the discovery in Sout'i America that ahe was only the man' 1 , mistress after all made her very mad. j Langworthy himself of course ave-s sbc j knew from first to last s\ie was only his misress, and says that he merely went through the cerem nies abroad to satisfy her religious scruple?. "GIDDY" SCOTT AGAIN. The interesting event of 1' st week was the marriage of tbe fair heroine of tbe sensational Sebrigbt nullity auir, Miss " Giddy " Scott, to the man of her heart, Mr Kicbard Ruseell. < >n this occasion a bishop officiated instead of a registrar, and it is not on record that the bride flung her wedding ring about when the ceremony came to au end. The decree nisi pronounced six months ago was only made absolute three weeks a?o, so that little time has been lost. Mr Russell must be a brave man. EN EOUTE FOR THE COLONIES. Miss Leonora Brabam, who was for more than ten years the prima donna of D'Oyley Carte's comic opera company at tbe .^avoy Thtatre, has severed her connection with that gentleman, and sailed for Melbourne on the 11th met , under a long engagement to Williamson and Garner, Mies Braham commenced hxr theatrical career as a member of German Reed's company. After acting at St George's Hall for some time with cmsiderable success, she married an organist named Barnes, and arcomp- nied h m to Canada. Two years later Barnes com> mitted suicide, and Mi s Biaham had to return to the si age. She soon attracted the attention of Mr W. S Gilbert, and in 1878 he engaged her for a leading part in "Patience." Subsequently, Miss Braham created Phyllis in " lolanthe "; the title role iv " Princess Ida," YumEumin the "Mikado," and Rose Maybird in " Ruddigore." Twelve months ago this clever lady married Mr Duncan Young, of German Reed's company, an able character actor, who accompanies her to Australia. Mrs Bernard-Beere has "struck oil" at the Opera Comique with a dramatic version of "As in a Looking Glass," which you may remember was one of the successful novels of 1885, The play is ** wordy " and in places dull, but Mrs Beere's representation of: the " shapy " vroman of fashon, who has nevertheless a heart somewhere, the critics xinanimonsly pronounce masterly. At the conclusion of her season at the Opera Comique Mrs Beere will make a short provincial tour and then proceed round the world a la Genevieve Ward. " MAHY A SUP 'TWXXT CDP AND IIP." The Abington and Peck clique stood an enormous stake on Quilp for the Manchest Cup. Their winnings at Epsom over Merry Hampton were trifling (tompartively speaking), but here the money was well down. One of the last bets taken before the start was £2000 to £1000 by the cute Robert Peck himself. Considering the size and character of the Quid opposing tbe favorite, this wager spoke volumes. The race itself resulted in the closest fiaish of the season. A quarter of a mile from bone Carlton and Quilp had it to themselves, and coming down the straight the head of first one and then the other popped in front. The pair passed the post locked together, and the excitement was intense until Carlton's number went ap. With a stronger jockey on him Quilp would certainly have got home first. Tiny Tommy Loates rode like the five*stone Trojan he is, but was j naturally no match in a close finish for George Barrett, and, according to Judge Clark, the latter just won on the post, a la Archer. What the feelings of the Peck party were I shouldn't like to say. The i Manton stable is now as lucky as last autumn it was the reverse, and Taylor's judgment with regard to Carlton had been abundantly vindicated. THE JUBILEE PLUNGES. By the way, I hßar that the " Jubile© Pianger," as that distracted '• Juggins,'' Mr Benzon, likes to be called, dropped £12,000 over the Derby, and £7000 on the Manchester Cup. The Witsuntide Plate, at Manchester, which was worth £5000, and is now the richest two-year-old stake of the seaaqn, fell to Mr Douglas's The Baird, with Briar«root (by Spring, field — Eglantine), a whole brother to the same gentleman's three-year-old Woodland who, curiously enough, at the very same moment was winning the Electric fctake of £2000 at Sandown Park. These two j successes must, to some extent, have atoned for the collapse of Enterprise before, and the defeat of Salisbury at Epsom. WATERLOO AVENGED ONCE MOBE. The ill-luck which attended the Abington Peck clique at Manchester accompanied them to Paris. That the colt would have won easily, there can hardly be doubt, but just before the start a fractuous French beast called Vannean, j struck into and lamed him. From that moment the Derby winner's obance was ! extinguished. To the astonishment of those on the stands, the green and plum cap was never fornainable at any period of tbe raoe, and, with tbe Baron settled 200 yds from home, M. Aumont's outsider Tenebreuse scored a very easy victory. Tbe gceneß thereupon enacted rivalled tbe notorious displays of 1983. when Front in beat St. Blaise. Excited Gauls embraced and wept over one another, some crying in militant tones " A has Us Anglaises .'" while others yelped like mad dogs. Tenebreuse is a stable companion of tbe Prixdu Jockey Club (French Derby) winner Monatque. Early in the season she carried off the French Two Thousand, and bore a high reputation till defeated iv the Prix de Diane (French Oaks) by Bavarde. The filly's starting price was 14 to 1. THE JUBILEE CDP. The once famous Minting, who had not been seen in public since the memorable afternoon on which he succumbed to Ormonde in the Two Thousand Guineas, was pulled out at Ascot on Tuesday for the Jubilee Cup, a superb piece of plate, valued at 1000 soys, with 500 soys added added in cash. The race (run over the new mile) looked a real good thing for the mighty Bendigo (9.8), who, iv addition to Minting (9.8), was opposed by St. Mirin (8 12), Aintree (7.10), and Forio (8.12). Backers tumbled over one another to lay 2 to 1 on Mr Barclay's champion, till Minting (who has grown into the most magnificent specimen of a thoroughbred conceivable) was paraded, when a slight reaction took place. Tha field ran well together to the distance, where, to every* one's astonishment, Bendigo compounded, and Minting, shaking off the determined challenge of St. Mirin, won rather easily by nearly a length, Aintree and Bendigo running a dead heat for third place. BOTAL ASCOT. The Ascot Shakes on Tuesday fell to John Hammond with the erratic Eurasian (5 yrs, Bst 61b) after a desperate race with ths favorite Exmoor (di yrs, Bst 41b) and Blauer (4 yrs, 7st 31b), the verdict

y tig " a hkojfl lio&d, a iiead beUvemi second and third." Eurasian started at Bto 1. Tho Prince of Wales stakes for three-year olds resulted in a fiasco, as halfway up the straight the favorites, Reve dOr and Phil, were much interfered with by a mounted policeman ; and the outsider Claymore (a colfc of Mr j Manton 1 s), escaping the melee, won by half a dozen lengths. Properly speaking, i though, this race should have gone to | Phil, who, according to Tom Cannon, had the measure of everything -when the catastrophe occurred. Wednesday proved a cala occasion for Mr •• Mantnn," wbo car 1 iad off the Coronation Stakes, with Heloise (an own sister to Tbebaisand St. Marguerite), the Aacot Derby with Timothy, and the Hunt Cup with Gay Hermit. T) r> lattor's victory gave the Ring a rare rlci g, «s hp ptarted first favorite at 5 to 1 in a big fie'd. Pearl Diver vas second, and « andlocnas (a!<o ranch fancied) third. Wood rode Gay Hermit (a half brother by Hermit to I Merry Hampton), and won by three- | quarters of a h j tigih. The G jtd Cup on Thursday res'lted in a most tragic "turn- up," Bird o' Fr-edom, who was merely started by Mr Douglas Baird to make ru ning for Sr. Michael, eetiing such a lead ih'it he was never caught, and won hands down from the tviujrscl(-re three yeay old Oarraeco, who had The BroD, St. Michael, Reve dOr, and King Monmoutb behind h'm. Tbe bijrefea c owd of tha week, however, assembled at Ascot on Friday to witness the meeting ofUrmonde, Minting, md .Bendigo in the Hardvricke Stake. On tbe strength of Mtntin'gq splendid display in the -fubilee Cup, there was plenty of fielding against the famous eon of Bend Or and L'idy Agnes. Nor were the adherents of Bendigo without hopes that tie Irishman would reverse Tuesday's form. Netting at the start rulid 25 to 20 on Ormonde, 7 to 4 Minting, 8 to 1 Bendigo, and 20 to 1 Phil, the only other starter. A Waterloo bullet was recovered the other day under unusual circumstances. A Skye crofter who served at Waterloo received a bullet in his leg, and it remained there during the rest of his life and was buried with him 12 years ago. On his grave being recently opened for the interment of a son, the bullet was found in the soil, and it has now been taken possession of by the family. It is described as round and of an unusually large size. The RIANUFACTOBE9 op New Zealand. — These include biscuits, soap, leather, boot making, breweries, woollen manufactures, carriage maker?, shipbuilders, manufacture of agricultural implements, works for mao chinery and manufactory requisites, brass and copper works, and many others. In Lancashire and Yorkshire, 'the mill hands and operatives suffer from certain diseases, peculiar to their calling, such as colds, coughs, asthma, diarrhoea, sore throat and lung diseases generally, for which they invariably take Freeman's Original Chlorodyne. Tbe inventor is glad to find that the operatire classes in New Zealand, like their fellow workers in England, look upon Freeman's Chlorodyne as the best and only medicine to tflko for these diseases. Insist upon having " Freeman's" only. Trade mark, an Elephant.— Sold everywhere- Obtainable from all chemists and storekeepers. Adviob to Mothers !— Are you broken in your rest by a sick child suffering withthe pain of cutting teeth? Go at once to a chemist and get a bottle of Mes Winslow'b Soothing. Syrup. It will relieve the poor sufferer immediately. It is perfectly harmless and pleasant to taste, it pi'oduces natural, quiet sleep, by relieving the child from pain, and the little cherub awakes " as bright as a button." It soothes the child, it soften 3 the gums, allays all pain, relieves wind, regulates the bowels, and is the best known remedy for dysentry and t>iarrh.O3a, whether arising from teething or other causes. Mrs Winslow's Soothing Syrup is sold by Medicisa dealers verywhere a.t la lid per bottle. Holloway's Ointment and Pills.— Though it is impossible, in this climate of changing temperature, to prevent ill health altogether, yet its form and frequency may be much mitigated by the early adoption of remedial measures. When hoarseness, cough, thick breathing, and the attending slight fever indicate irritation of the throat or chest, Holloway's Ointment should be rubbed upon these parts without delay, and his Pills taken in appropriate doses, to promote its curative action. No catarrhs or sore throats can resist these remedies, Printed directions envelope every package of Holloway'a medicaments, which are suited to all ages and conditions, and every ordinary dsease to which humanity is liableVT.D Valuable Discovery fou the Hair. If your hair is turning grey or white, or falling off, use " The Mexican Hair Kenewer,' for it will positively restore in every case Chrci or White hair to its original color, without caving the disagreeable smell of most • ' Restorers.' ' It makes the hair charmingly beautiful, as well as promoting the grown of the hair on bald spots, where the glands are not decayed. Ask your Chemist for "The Mexican Hair Renkaver," sold by Chemists and Perfumers everywhere at Is 6d. per Bottle. Wholesale depot 33, Earingdon Rr ad, London. Fioriline !— For the Teeth and Breath —A few drops of the liquid " Floriline " sprinkled on a wet tooth-brush produces a pleasant lather, which thoroughly cleanse, the teeth from all parasites or impuritie9 hardens the gums, prevents tartar, stop decay, gives to the teeth a peculiar pearly whiteness, and a delightful fragrance to the breath. It removes all unpleasant odour arising from decayed teeth or tobacco smoker " The Fragrant Floriline," being composed in part of Honey and sweet herbs, is delicious to the taste, and the greatest tj ile discovery of the age. Price 2s 6d., of aIJ Chemists and Perfumers. Wholesale depot 33, Farringdon Road, London, Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, &c, are quickly cured by ÜBing Baxter's " Lung Preserver." This old-established medicine is pleasant to the palate, and highly extolled by member? of the medical, legal, and clerical professions. For testimonials see first page. Sold by all patent medicine vendors. List of wholesale agents jb given in advertisement. — At>vt. j

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18870813.2.10

Bibliographic details

TOPICS OF THE DAY., West Coast Times, Issue 6510, 13 August 1887

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3,126

TOPICS OF THE DAY. West Coast Times, Issue 6510, 13 August 1887

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