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West Coast Times. THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1887.

The enthusiasm manifested by the speakers and the public at the meeting 1 on Tuesday night augurs well not only for a suitable commemoration of her Majesty's Jubilee, but also for the establishment of an institution that is greatly wanted here. Certainly some objections were made concerning an Old Man's Home, but the arguments employed by the speakers did not,

appear forcible, presumably from the fact that their opposition arose in reality from excessive caution ; it is hoped that on more mature consideration they will also lend the weight of their assistance so that all may work unitedly for the one commou good. The greatest strength lent to the cause of the establishment we advocate was contributed by the Rev. H. Gr. Goulu, who could speak from a knowledge) of the immediate benefits to be derived by the Benevolent Society here whilst he could also enlighten his hearers as to the satisfactory results achieved in a similar institution in another part of the Colony. This lent the greatest strength because the opposition of Messrs Michel and Taifc was avowedly aroused by a dread of failure or of additional taxation, both bugbears sufficiently powerful to alarm an audience or a cotnmuuity. And, indeed, we see no reason why these institutions should not be altogether self-supporting. To begin with, their wants would be largely supplied by their own labor, and those articles they required to purchnse could almost, if not entirely be bought by monpy derived from the sale of their own produce. It iB not to be supposed because they are old and feeble, they are unable to work ; their intelligent labor would amount to a large item, and it might be exercised iv directions that bring profitable results without the expenditure of much physical force. Iv several of tha religious communal establishments of America, the hours of labor are restricted to four or one-sixth of the day of 24 hours. Yet in spite of the shortness of this allotted time they are nearly all comparatively wealthy, whilst in one or two their wealth is a sore trouble to them ; their rules enjoining poverty, whilst by their frugality and abstinence, they have accumulated wealth. We are convinced that communal establishments, though formed by the poorest and most feeble members of the community, will find their labor bring ia most profitable results, the commune havingthe strength jjof the unity of individuals who find that as individuals they are unable to fig*ht the battle of life. We have only to point to the work effected by Mr Gribben as an instance of what can be done with excelleut ; organisation. What greater obstacles could be met with than those encountered by him, and what better results could have been 1 } hoped for. It is true men like Mr Gribben to take charge of an establishment like we propose are scarce, but they are becoming less so every day. ft has been shown how by an union of patience, gentleness, and intelligence the most violent natures can be brought into a state of submission, and the habits of method and order thus learned are being profited by the world in many directions. And in what better direction could they be applied than in the manner we suggested where feebleness is really the only drawback, that wonderful law of nature — self preservation — being suflicient to force the most rugged minded to yield to those rules which are best for the governance of the community. We look to 6ee in these the beginning of the working of that grand principle of co-operation which will, if carried out as men could do if they wished, make our days of work and toil but a vision of the past, tbe present encompassing the allotted span with but a tithe of the oid labor and discomfort.

To-morrow being Good Friday there will be no issue of this paper.

A meeting of the Board of Governors of the Hokitika High School was held at [the Town Hall yesterday afternoon. Present — His Worship the Mayor (chair), Hon. J. A. Bonar Dr M'Brearty, Messrs H. R. Rae, Grrimmond , and Hudson. The business of tbe meeting was to consult with Messrs Smith and E. B • Dixon, Inspector of Schools, and headmaster o the State School, Hokitika, who were present, as to the possibUity of turning the State School into a District High School. Mr Dixon said tho first question involved was one of money. Tho Mayor explained it was doubtful whether the funds now in hand could be applied to the District School. Mr Smith, in J answering to a question, said he thought it impossible to establish a High School upon £100 a year ; other High Schools were supported by rich endowments. He could only be guided in the matter by experience. He showed from tables in connection with the Auckland High School, dating from 1884 to 1886, how they had languished from want of pupils. There bad, in fact, been a falling off of from 46 pupils in 1884 to 18 in 1886. With, reference to the Wanganui Sohool, the report showed that the cost per head was enormous, and that the attendance was next to nothing. These schools had been abolished in the following year. Master ton afforded another example of complete failure. Mr EB. Dixon pointed out that there might be innumerable reasons why these schools had failed, if they wore only able to discuss them* He saw no reason why the schools should boa failure. His Worship the Mayor said that Wanganui appeared to furnish a parallel case. Mr M'VVhirter hod nent word to him that he opposed a District High School as tending to shelve the ultimate establishment of a High School. After some discussion the opinion of members Beemed to tend in the direction of letting their funds accumulate, and taking no step until a school was absolutely needed Their alternative was to efface themselves, throw over their provisions, by means of special legislation, grant additional powers to the Education Board and establish a District High School. In answer to a question as to whether it would be worth while to make another attempt to estaba lish the Bchool, Mr Dixon said another attempt might be made. He thought the matter had not been properly laid before the public. Mr Grimmond pointed out that it cost less to send a boy to the Christchurch school than it would to the Hokitika one. Mr Hudson then advocated making another attempt at the end of the year. Mr Bonar suggested adjourning for three months, aod in the meantime information could be obtained. Mr Dixon reminded them that many parents might not like to bind them> selves in any way, but yet would Bend their children when once they saw tbe school established. Cordial votes of thanka were paEsed to Mesßrs Hudson, Smith, and Dixon for their attendance, And tbe meeting ad. journed.

Tbe Westland portion of the incoming San Francisco mail has been forwarded from Wellington to Chrißtchurcb, and will there* faro be due here on Saturday night.

We huve been requested to Btate that the time for closing tenders for boxes and baskets for the parcels post has been extended until May 11th. A specimen box may be seen at the Poßt Office A cricket raaLch will be played on Cass Square oa Good Friday between teams choßen by Mqsars J. Lynch and Noble. Members of the Union Club are requested to attend on the ground. The Weekly Leader issue 1 to-day contains more than the average modicum of news. This i 9 attributable partly to the S.m Francisco mail news which is abundant and refers to important topics. Reports of various meetings also swell its contents. Tho Storyteller is aa readable as ever, and Mr Rae'a experience of Sullivan, the notorious bmhrauger and murderer, will be found highly interesting. There is the usual quantity of local, general and mining intellU gence. Messrs Sprob & Co. offer for sale at Mr Jamieson's farm, Upper Arahura, to-day at 11 o'clock, valuable farm property, horses, cattle, farm stock, &c. Mr Barton notifies that the racecourse will be closed from horses training after nine o'clock on Saturday morning. Ou Saturday Dight Miss Georgie Smitbson who is the only female Maccabe, will open with her company at the Duke of Edinburgh Theitre. Included in the company «re to be found such artistes as Mr Harry Power, the comedian, Mr L. Dunbar, Miss Nellie Edwards, Mr H. Gribbon, Misnes Cameron and Edith, whilst Miss Saaton presides over the music-.il arrangements. From Miss Smitbson's hearty reception on a former occasion and the excellence of her entertainments we may predict she will find her visit a success in more ways than one. Meßsrs Pollock & Bevjn will sell at their rooms totday, at two o'clock, the whole of the property in the partnership of Messrs .Cassidy, Clarke & Co., including freeholds* horses, buggies, harness, &c.

Last night, at tho Public ELI I, Kanieri, Mr Bevan lectured to an appreciative audience. This lecture was altogether distinct from the one delivered by him on behalf of the various charities in various centres, ftlr Bevan is such an ardent admirer of Obarles Dickens that it would probably take him many lectures to fully portray the many phases, the lights and shadows, the humor and the sadness of Dickeus' life and writings. On this occasion the audience were led through the " Dream tne Star," thence to the wreck of the " Royil Charter," the noble conduct of the clergyman who performed the last sad offices beiug eloquently descanted upon. From thence we came to the story of the brutal Yorkshire schoolmaster, the reßcue of the poor, tortured Smike, and a glowing tribute is paid to the present state of our educational system which the lecturer ascribed largely to the influence of Dickens. Passing on to lighter themes the immortal Sam Weller and the scarcely less original Tony are brought to view, not in the earlier scenes but after Sam's marriage, when the railroad had wounded the old mait coach driver's professional instiucts and the dange r of being fastened in a carriage with a " widder " brought alarmingly near home to him. Then we have Dolly Varden-, Sampson Brass and hia sister " the Bhe dragon." Then with a glowing peroration, which embraced some of the eulogium delivered in West, minster Abbey, Mr Bevan concluded. Mr M'Kay moved and Mr Dale seconded a vote of thanks to the lecturer, waicb was put by the Chairman (Mr Ross) and carried by acclamation, all the speakers referring to the lecture iv the most complimentary term?.

Tbe Government s'eamer Stella arrived off the roadstead yesterday, and will be tens dered by the Waipara this moroin?. Why the Stella does not come in herself, seeing there are three or four feet more water on the bar than she draws was a question a good many persons asked yesterday.

la another column appears an advertises ment of a children's' fancj dresa baziari organized to raise fuuds on behalf of Dr Barnardo's homes for destitute childreu. The great feature of the affair is that it is a work done by children for children; the few ladies who hare done so much work in organising and forwarding arrangements deserve every praise, for on them the bulk of the work has fallen, although there havo been many willing helpers from all parts of the district. The great attraction of the bazaar, as far as the adult public is concerned undoubtedly is with the children's dancing. Tuere are about 20 altogether who will, in fancy costume, dance the Muy Pole dance and Sir Roger Covorly. One or two young ladies also will dance Scotch dances, hornpipes, &c. The gouds at the bazaar itself are almost entirely for children, who are saving up for a couple of days' prodigality, tho adults, therefore, will pot need to fee' any fear of very seiioua levies on their purses- The object the promoters have bad in view is°the raising of a few pouads for a most uaeful work:, :iud at the same time to instil in the win '8 of (he children h' re a feeling of sympathy"for their destitute fellows elsewhere. These objects wilj be achieved even if tbe affair is only a moderate success, but from the many attractive features presented we have no doubt of the hall being thronged both days.

There was a muster last night at the Drill Shed of those members of the Ist Westland Rifles who intend being present at the New Plymouth encampment. The Stella arrived io the roadstead yesterday, and this morning the meu will be taken off to her by the Waipara.

There was a practice last night of those members of the Fire Brigade who intend competing for the cup presented by the late Msyor, Mr John Tait. Some excellent time was made, Lieut. Ross completing his work in 44 seconds.

"Rough on Itcb."— "Rough on Itcb," cures skin humors, eruptions, ring worm, tetter, salt rheum, frosted feet, chilblains, itch vy poison, barber's itcb.

ARattlesnake'sßite.— Thequick venom of the rattlesnake has not killed so maDy people as the more insidious but deadly poisons found in the air of foul rooms. The aeration of the blood by the lungs becomes impossible sometimes, and the falling health growing weakness, and loss of appetite are harbingers of approaching death. For such cases Hop Bitters are tbe potent and allpowerful remedy to drive all fevers out of the system, purifying the blood, and giving a new and happy lease of life. Get genuine. Wolfe's Schnapps— Keep it always in "the house and then you will have a friend in time of need.

The Christchurch coach arrived at half* past ten o'clock last night . Passengers— For Greymouth: Mr Deeham. For Hokitika: Messrs Brooksmith, Taylor, D. Collins, and Meatn. Mr Cassidy piloted the coach through, and reports that the mails had to bo packed twice, once at Otira, und aaraia at Blue Point. The proprietors of the coach are to be cou« gratulated on the complete arrangements made to obviate the difficulty of the road. No less than five coaches are employed to make the connections complete, and intend* ing passengers may safely) count upon being delivered at their destination only an hour or two later than theusuil time. In another week the road, will be sufficiently repaired to enable the coach to run through without other than the usual stoppages.

"Rough ou Corns."— Ask for Wells' " Rough on Corns." Quick relief, complete, perraauent cure. Corns, wurts, buuions. At chemists and druggists.

In the damp, cold climate of New Zealand people are especially subject to all sorts of affections of tbe tbroit and sliest. It is indispensiblo that means should be resorted to counteract the baneful climatic iufltin ences, and nothing can do tmt so effectually as Petlit's Eucalyptus Balaam, which cures consumption, whooping cough, bronchitis asthma, and all kindred complaints, and effectually f>rtifies the system against climatic influences. Read. — Advt.

£100JRewaud.— They cure all diseases of the stomach, bowels, blood, liver, nerves and kidneys, and £100 will be paid for a case thpy eannnfc cure nor help, or for anything irapurs or injurious found io them — Hop Bifctere Genuine only rmflp by American Co.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18870407.2.6

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1887., West Coast Times, Issue 6461, 7 April 1887

Word Count
2,549

West Coast Times. THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1887. West Coast Times, Issue 6461, 7 April 1887

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