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SKETCHES OF NEW MEMBERS

[WELLINGTON POST."]

Mr John Bevan, who has ousted Mr FitzGerald from tbe representation of Hokitika, is of Welsh extraction, and was born and educated in the island of Jersey. He is a colonist of 27 years standing, having been a resident for 19 years in Hokitika. He i 3 a partner iv the well-known firm of Pollock and Bevau, merchants. He is a Liberal in politics, and strongly objects to the continuance of the Atkinson Government. He is an eloquent speaker, with pronounced ideas on tho leading public questions of the day. He has always taken an active interest in local maltcre, and was formerly a member of the Borough Council, and P.esidentotthe Hokitika Hospital. He is now Chairman of tbe Chamber of Commerce, and is a prominent Freemason of 2t> years' standing now holding tbe position of District Grand Master of the Westland District, and Grand Superintendent of the Royal Arch Masons under appointment from H.R.H. the Princo of Wales, and Provincial Grand Arch Master under appoint ment from Lord Henneker, besides being honorary member of many lodges at Home aud abroad. He is a moat popular public lecturer in the cause ot charity in Westland, and recently, when in London, received most complimentary notices from the Press for his platform deliverances. He will prove a decided acquisition to the ranks ot tbe Liberal party.

Mr Arthur Robert Guinness, member for Grey District, was born at Calcutta, British India, in 1846. He is the eldest son of Mr Frank Guinness, late Resident Magistrate and Warden, fie arrived at Lyttelton in August, 1852, from Calcutta, Tia South Australia and Melbourne. He entered as a boarder at Christ College Grammar School, Cbristchuroh, in 1854, and left school in 1859, when he went into the office of Mr E. F. B. Harston, solicitor, to whom he was subsequently articled. Iv 1862, the business being sold to Messrs Garrick aud Cowlishaw, his articles were transferred to Mr Cowlishaw, aud he was admitted in May, 1867, by his Honor Mr James Grespon as a barrister and solicitor of tho Supreme Court. While serving his articles he was residing with and receiving private tuition from Rev. J. C. Bagshaw, M.A., and also from Rev. W. J. Habeas,

B.A. In Decemßbfr 1867, he went to Greytod&hi aud/B#ted jo practise his jjJrbfejßiori. 1 He Brlty cdnjested a seat in tblj Wbsttand. PrpyJjticiiU Council for the Paroa aiatrjet, which he 4»d successfully. While in the Provincial Council be was sent for by the Superintendent to form the first responsible Kxecutivc Council, the late John White, M.H.R., being Provincial Secretary, Peter Dungan, Goldfield's Secretary, and A. R. Guinness, Provincial Solicitor. This executive btily lived a few days, when they were succeeded by 0. Woolcock, W. Todd, and Jfl. T- Robinson. At the general election in 1876 he was a candidate for a seat in the Assembly, but was defeated by Mesrs Woolcock and Kennedy, after a veiy hotly conto«ted election. When ihe Counties Act, 1876, was brought into force he was returned for Marsdea Hiding, and at tbe firat meeting of the Grey County Council, in January 1877, he was elected County Chairman by 6to 3. A petition having been lodged against his election as member for Marsdea hiding on the ground that certain voters (about twenty-five or thirty Chinamen) had beeo prevented from voting, theE.M. (Mr Revell) decided that the election was void, and the seat waa declared vacant. He again contested the seat successfully, and the Council again elected him chairman. In 1878 he was returned for tbe same riding with a large majority, snd again in 1881 he was returned for Paroa Riding. He has been elected at the first meeting of each County Council as County Chairman, and laterly every year unanimously. In the recent General Assembly elecions he polled 848 votes. He is a ready speaker with much promising ability and of calm jndgmenf, and possessing indomitable perseverance. Being a comparatively young man, and having had a long and useful experience in the ground work or apprenticeship of politics, the opinion may fairly be hazarded th*t his resting place will not be at tbe foot of the political ladder.

Mr Eugene Joseph O'Connor member for the Buller, cannot properly be classified as one of the " new blood," though he has not sat in Parliament for the past nine years. He represented the Buller conaituency in the Assembly from 1871 to 1875 inclusive, during the Premiership, of Sir W. Fox, Sir J. Yogel, and Dr Pollen. He is an unmistakable native of Ireland, was partly educated in France, and is an old colonist, having emigrated to Victoria over thirty years ago. Since then he has been actively and successfully engaged in a multitude oi business on the Victorian and New Zealand goldfielda. During his residence in Wesport, extending over sixteen years, he has taken part in every public movement of local importance. In the days of Provincialism, he represented his present district in the Nelson Provincial Council, and acted in the capacity of Provincial Secretary for some yeaiß. He had rendered invaluable services to the town of VVestport end to the Buller district generally, particularly in respect to the harbour works and the development of the coalfields. He is endowed with considerable ability, is shrewd, sensible and thoroughly practical, making himself acquainted in full detail with the subjects he takes in hand, and he is a fluent Bpeaker. In politics, as in business he is full of application and undaunted energy. He will feel happier in front of than behind the Government benches, whoever may be in power, opposition having been his forte through life. The man who has tackled with an opposition lino of coaches the original Cobb, of Melbourne and Ballarat fame, who has striven with opposition steamers and newspapers in backward times, and who has won and lost eeveral elections in the keenest and closest contests, may fairly be accredited with having some " go " in him, and possessing some acquaintance with what Captain Barry calls the " ups and downß " of colonial life. Receiving " more kicks than ha'pence " from his political opponents when first winning his spurs, to his credit be it said that by sheer pluck his foot in turn secured the stirrup, and he is once more in the Parliamentary saddle, willing to assist the cause of his friends, and more ready perhaps to attack his enemies, amongst whom stands most prominent the late representative of the district. He may be sa dto combine tbe double qualities of "a staunch friend" with those of <l a good hater."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18840811.2.13

Bibliographic details

SKETCHES OF NEW MEMBERS, West Coast Times, Issue 4691, 11 August 1884

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1,101

SKETCHES OF NEW MEMBERS West Coast Times, Issue 4691, 11 August 1884

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