Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

West Coast Times. THURSDAY, JULY 5, 1883.

When a red-hot Ministerial paper published at the seat of Government, pays a flattering tribute to a member of tbe Opposition, it may be well considered that one of two reasons prompts its 'action. The person praised is either on the eye of changing Bides, of travelling from Liberal to Conservative, or ? his attack upon the ministry has contained such vigor and truth, that a hint has been given to tbe " inspired organ " that it would be well not to rub the vigorous orator the wrong way. We are prompted lo make these remarks because of the fact that the New Zealand Times, in an article upon the debate on the Address in Reply, has discovered merits in Mr Seddon which have hitherto been hidden from its Argus-eyes. We will now quote extracts from the article referred to, to show the style in which our contemporary speaks of the member for Kumara :—

Mr Seddon, who re-opened the discussion, spoke with a rough vigor and an amusing liveliness, which at least interested, if they did not instruct his audience. In fact, so' far aft the present debate is concerned, he has shown a better.

title than Mr Montgomery to be the leader of the Opposition. And, besides arresting attention by the manner of his speech, in its matter he put the case of the Opposition, such as if wa9, better than any one else on his side of the House. Whether his remarks were suitable for that special occasion is another question, and a very different one. Still he placed with great clearness before the House the heads of the indictments preferred against the Ministry. According to the member for Kumara, the Ministry are chargeable with two serious delinquencies, namely, first, political bribery in several cases ; and, secondly, neglect in promise of legislation with regard to a number of subjects urgently requiring it. If Mr Seddon's statement is' correct, the vote for making Wanganui Bridge free to the public was a bribe so palpable that the people of Wanganui themselves laughed at the removal of the toll as a provincial liability. Then, again, it was urged, in the cases of Mr Pilliet's disqualification, Mr Shaw's election, and that of Mr Lee at Selwyn, there was further bribery on the one hand and intimidation on the other ; the Nelson people were bribed for their support by the two members lately appointed to the Upper House as a compensation for their deprivation of a member through the Electoral Act ; Mr Brandon was offered a seat in the Upper House because his partner; Mr Shaw, had a vote, as the recently elected member for Inangahua _in the Lower House ; if the Ministiy wanted to swamp the Legislative Council with new members, tbe proper time to do so would has been when Mr Eolleston's Land Bill was rejected."

It will be perceived that while our , contemporary speaks highly of Mr Seddon's speech, it does not fail to attack every other member of the Opposition who took pare in tbe debate. We do not think, however, on this account that the Times intended its criticism of tbe member for Kumara to be taken as "sarkasm." On the contrary the charge of political bribery which the "irrepressible" levelled at the Ministerial heads, is proved. Mr Shaw, the elect of Inangahua, did not scruple to tell that constituency that if they chose him, the Government would vote them more moaey for local works. Everyone knows that the counts of Mr Seddon's indictment are true, but everyone has not the courage to get up in the House, as Mr Seddou did, and state them openly. J There is no reason to believe that the member for Kumara is likely' to be reconciled with the present Governmeni, bo that the fact of his drawing kudos from such an unexpected quarter as a Government paper, can only be due to tbe truth of his charges and the rough vigour with which they were made.

There was a meeting of the Waste Lands Board at 2 p.m. yesterday. Present— Tha Chief Commissioner, the Hon. J. A. Bonar Mesßrs Chesney and Robinson. The minutes were read and confirmed. The application of G. Stephenson to lease rnn No. 65, Moeraki North and Haast Biver road, was considered in connection with a letter re ceived from Mr J. T. Baird, enclosing licenses of runs Nob. 50 and 65. It was resolved to accept the surrender of the licenses, and to ' schedule the run asked for by Mr Stephenson for the next auction sale, A letter was received from Thomas Regan, Btating that the settlers on ihe deferred payment block, north side of the Teretnakau, were petitioning the Government for a dray road to be made from the settlement to the Greenstone road, and asking the Commissioner of Crown Lands to recommend tbe same to the favorable consideration of Government. The Receiver of Land Revenue notified the receipt of the sum of £95 19s Bd. The Board then rose-

The death of Mr David Spence, of the firm of J. and D. Spence, merchants, Melbourne, which took place on the 16th ult } is announced in another column. This gentleman has been long and favorably known in commercial circles in the colonies. In the early days of this coast, he was a frequent visitor to Hokitika where he has many friends who will deeply regret to learn of the sad tidings of his death. He was a gentleman of great enterprise , genial in habits, and upright in all his transactions. He died at his residence at Balaclava, at the age of 51 years.

Telegrams in brief, July 4th:— Wellington: A Fine Arts Exhibition will be opened here on the 23rd inst.— Christchurch: At the Supreme Court i to*day, Charles Edward Dudley, accused of embezzlement, S. A. Ammon and wife, arson, and William Legge, sheep stealing, were acquitted; Two small companies to work for diamonds at Oxford Forest have been registered; The rumor that girls were overworked at the Orphanage has, on enquiry, proved -to be unfounded; A drunken commercial traveller jumped through a first floor window of Leeston Hotel, and bruised himself severely.

At the Resident Magistrate's Court yester. day, before J. Giles Esq., 8.M., judgment reseryed from the day before, was given in the case Bladier v, Diedrichs, for £5, the amount paid into court. There was no other business.

The Christchurch coach arrived at the usual hour yesterday afternoon.

The Botorua, with the San Francisco mails, arrived at Nelson, at eight o'clock yesterday morning, and at Wellington yesterday afternoon. The Westland portion will arrive here, most probably, by coach from Cbristchurch on Saturday.

St. Blaise, winner of the English Derby, is owned by the Prince of Wales, Sir J?. Johnstone, and Lord Arlington, who shared £80,000 over the race. The Princess of Wales gave a brilliant party in honor of the victory. C. Wood was the jockey who steered the winner.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18830705.2.8

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. THURSDAY, JULY 5, 1883., West Coast Times, Issue 4354, 5 July 1883

Word Count
1,163

West Coast Times. THURSDAY, JULY 5, 1883. West Coast Times, Issue 4354, 5 July 1883

Working