Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1878.

Parliament has been termed the " collected wisdom of the country." It is* an agency for the political education of • the people. It should be a school of morals and of manners. The intelligence, culture, public spirit, and patriotism of the, community, should be centred there. An elevated morale, a fair capacity for work, a sedulous application to business and a steady devotion to the public interests, are qualities which we are justified in expecting from our represeniatives. The higher the tone of our public men is, the purer, and more elevated the people wiil|*be. These things being recognised,.- at is worth serious consideration t$ study what we are called upon to enact td-day, for to-day the opportunity is .afforded, us of electing a member to serve us and the country geneAjjly,' lor 'the remaining term of the present Parliament of New Zealand. Do' we really appreciate what this means ? Do we sufficiently realize that an election, is part and parcel of those glorious rights and privileges which were struggled for and wrested in the face of opposition, persecution, and bloodshed, through a long vista of siges, until at last a constitution was handed down to us which gives to almost every man a voice in the affairs of Government, gives to him a free press, liberty of speech, liberty of conscience, and throws the same mantle of protection around men of every class, every creed* every clime. Do we know that according as we use or abuse the inestimable privileges which we possess, so they may be strengthened and expanded, or limited and lost. Do we ever dream that they may be sacrificed ? Return a Parliament of Wakefields and Prendergasts, and see, Return good and true men and our bulwarks are conserved. Take no interest in, be indifferent to, and lose sight of the ends and aims of good government — in fine, be careless of the men we elect, and our institutions will become effete, and amidst the throea of corruption and vice we shall speedily retrogade. To turn aside from generalities, we would ask, do we sufficiently contemplate how much may depend upon the present election. Do we recognise that the party now in power, is seeking to extend our privileges, that it is seeking to give to every man a voice in the government of his country, 'that it is Heeking to adjust the burden of that government and exact from those to whom much is given, a fair and just receipt. Are we sufficiently impressed that this district labors under exceptional disadvantages, lhat it is enclosed by a harborless sea wall on its front

and an almost impassable chain of. mountains on its rear, that it has no limitless plains of pastoral and agricultural land, that gold is its only staple, which must be exhausted in time, Tha.t there are, however, indications of apparently inexhaustible resources, and that these want developing, and that by the fostering care of Government, and that, the present administration have piven us many promises of aid. Are we, we reneat, duly sensible of these things. These momentous facts and many other considerations, give to the present conrest :i special interest. What therefore is obviously our duty to»-<lay ? Dues the question really require answering ? Has it not already been sufficiently answered in- the heart.s of every true man ? Is not the response so patent that to repeat it is almost to imply a doubt? We have given no uncertain sound from the first on this matter, and at the risk of repetition we shall again declare our convictions. Mr Croumbie-Brown having retired, two candidates only remain in the field, namely, Mr Seymour Thome George, and Mr Gerard George FitzGerald. Of the latter we shall simply sjf&that his whole career is an evidence oißia unfitness to govern — his conduct* is not reconcilable with sane motives oV intentions. He has a oharacter of sheer Bedlam, and to return him would be to stultify and disgrace ourselves, render him no service, imperil our opportunities, and partially disfranchise this constituency. Mr George, on the other hand, is a gentleman of station, education, intelligence, and wealth, who has espoused politics as a profession — who is a sincere and 6taunch supporter of the present administration — who as the nephew of Sir George Grey, necessarily possesses influence — a man with whom our liberties and privileges oan be trusted, whose return will reflect honor upon the community, ami whose devotion to our wants and interests can be relied upon. In short, we could pursue indefinitely the many points of contrast between the two candidates, but just now let us test the relative fitness of the two men by one recent example. How have each of them exhibited their appreciation of the value of the present seat ? Tho one, Mr George, has throughout his candidature been zealous, untiring, ami punctual. He has shewn thai he cherishes the privilege and appreciates the aim of being our representative ; he, deeming the seat worth having, has sedulously applied himself to the business of interviewing the electors. The other, Mr FitzGerald, how has he striven for the position ? Has he been punctual ? has he shown his consideration for the electors? has he treated them with respect even ? has he, in short, even during his candidature, given evidence of fitness to hold the position be in such au extraordinary manner seeks ? We appeal to the intelligence aud common sense of the electors to record their votes for Mr George. As lovers of order, morality, and manners, the verdict must be in his favor. No door should be left open for the constituency hereafter^ to confess itself ashamed of this day?! '^ai'liy but rather let them stamp their*ftljj|upon a glaring scandal. A just ojflfcijwation of the issue for which wGJRe contending, can lead but one result. The electors will, we We sure, be influenced by no aide issues or morbid sympathies, but . will assert their true interests, and lift their hands iv favor of Mr George.

The prosperity of this district depends largely, upon the resalt of this day's voting. The issue is not a personal one. On the one side we have a pretended supporter, and on the other a sterling, houest upholder of Sir George Grey's Government. That this is the case no one can doubt, when there is found ranged with Mr FitzGeruld, the ex-member, who resigned at the requesc of his constituency because he would not vote with the Premier. For our part we have no fear of the result. We would be loath to insult the common sense of any community, by supposing lhat Major Atkinson's adherent will be returned. Sir George Grey has done more for this district already than all the former Premiers together, and will, we are sure, in the future fulfil his promises to us. We have approved of his policy ; we recognise its justness, and the benefits it will confer on the masses. The old order of things has passed away. The days of cliques and rings aud heaven born legislators have gone, never, we hope, to return. That such a change as this should startle and dismay officialdom throughout the country is not to be wondered at. Men can no longer grow fat in cosy billets without doiDg fair work for their money. From officials present and past, the principal opposition to Mr Greorge comes. But the mass of the electors, the mechanic, the laborer, the miner, the people who pay now an unjust proportion of taxation will surely not hesitate to record, their votes in favor of Mr George, an honest supporter of the man, who is now fighting the fight of the people against squatterdom and officialdom. It becomes us to strengthen the hands of Sir George Grey, instead of thwarting his. policy, and we can best do so by returning Mr Seymour Thorne George at the head of the poll.

Wk were surprised to find that our exmember, Mr C. E. Button, seconded the motion approving of Mr G-. Gr. FitzGerald's candidature at the Theatre last night, as only a day or two ago, he distinctly assorted that although he could not vote for Mr George, " lie was ashamed to vote for Mr FitzGerald, and would not vole at all." Has Mr FitzGerald secretly pledged himself to Mr Button to support the Opposition, or is this naorely another of Mr Button's eccentricities?

The polling for the Hokitika election takes place to-day. The poll opens at nine a.m.» and closes at four p.m. The polling booth is at the Resident Magistrate's Court,

Mr George visited Kanieri, Hau Hau, Blue Spur, and the Upper Crossing yesterday, aqd ho was well received by a number of electors at each pla.ee. He did not address any meeting until the evening, when he met the electors in the Public Hall, Kanieri, as mentioned in another paragraph.

There, was a crowded meeting of the electors at the Duke of Edinburgh Theatre last evening to hear Mr FitaGeralcl. The Mayor was in the chair ; and on the platform were Dr Dermott, Messrs Bevan, Hall, Clapcott, and Button. The candidate's speech, which contained nothing new, beyond what has been previously reported by us, was well received, and at its conclusion a vote of confidence moved by Mr Hall, and seconded by Mr Button, was carried unanimously.

Should miners who desire to vote to-day, have allowed their rights to expire, they may vote by getting their rights antedated, if the risrhfc has lapsed a month without payment, and if three months, by paying a fee of ten shillings. The following is the text of the 28th clause of the Mines Act:— "lf the holder of either a miner's right orii business license Bhall neglect on the exp^H^f hereof to take out a new right or lice^^^Hie case may be, a new right or licensWT of the duy of such expiration may nevertheless be granted to such holder upon production of such expired right or license within one month from such expiration without peualty, and within three mouths upon payment of the sum of ten shillings in addition to the ordinary price of a miner's right or business license, and every new right or license bo issued Bhall be in such one of the forms in the Second and Third Schedules to thia Act as shall be applicable, and shall be of the same force and efficacy as if issued on tie duy of the expiration of the former right or license."

Aliens whose names are on the electoral roll can vote on that qualification. It is too late to object after the rolls are revised and published. We mention this as a large number of foreigners arc, we believe, under a different impression.

There was no police business at the Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday, and only a few civil casas, in most of which judgment went by default.

The Suez English mail arrived at the Bluff yesterday morning.

The following telegram was "forwarded to the General Government by Mr Fowler, the President of the Hospital Committee: — "23rd June, 1878, Colonial Secretary, Wellington. Hospital Committee goes out of offi :e cud of month by effluxion of time, they are willing to carry on duties as a committee if Government request them to do so, until County und Borough Councils decide how management skall be conducted iv future— W. L. "Fowler." The following is the reply: — "25th June, 1878, W. L. Fowler, Esq., Hokitika — Government desires to record their higli appreciation of benevolent and efficient management of Hokitika Hospital, and earnestly wish that the same system could be carried out throughout the Colouy. Therefore, gladly accept your offer as in places where local organisation already exists there is no necessity for a change. The Hospital Committee have done great services to the locality, which it is a duty on my part to acknowledge. — G. S. Whitmobe.

Mr Seymour George addressed the electors at the Kanieri Publio Hall last evening. There were about two hundred persons present, the greater number of whom were miners. Mr William Webster was voted to the chair, and briefly introduced the candidate, who discoursed at some length on the leading questions of the day, announcing himself as a thorough supporter of the present education system, and determined to use every effort, if returned, to bring about such an adjustment of taxation as would relieve the burdens of the working classes. In reference to the laud system, he said he was in favor of such legislation as would result in the cutting up" of the large runs and squatting properties, which at present were so great an impediment to tho settlement of the people on the soil. He would like to see the most liberal assistance given to the prospecting efforts of miuers, and thought the Government should contribute £ for £ to all prospecting associations. The gold duty should be abolished, and miners rights reduced to tea shillings. Several questious were asked the candidate and were answered to the entire satisfaction of the audience. A vote of confidence was proposed by Mr Poison, and carried unanimously, there not being one dissentient.' After the meeting, a strong committee was formed to secure Mr George's return, consisting of. thirty-two miners.

A meeting of the Mikonui Water Race Committee was held at the Ross Council Chambers on Friday evening. Present — Messrs Malfroy (chairman), Kid will, Moran, Lockington, Healy, Ilanter, Hirter, M'Key, Yorwarth, and Joseph. Mr Hirter moved — " That the secretary be instructed to write to the Ross Borough Council and ask whether they will undertake to give the Government the necessary guarantee for the completion of the third section of the Mikonui race as set forth, in the Hon. W. Gisborne's memorandum of March last, and the reply of the Hon. J. Macandrew thereto, and also of the telegram of this day's date." Mr Lockingten seconded the motion, which was carried. Mr Yorwarth moved—" That this Committee respectfuliy ask the Borough Council to give a guarantee to the Mikonui Water Race for preliminary expenses for the printing of the prospectus, &c, such not to exceed £50, in event of the Company not floating." Mr Hunter seconded the motion, which was earned. Mr Costello moved— " That a vote of thanks bs passed to the Hon. W. Gisborne for- his exertions to promote the welfare of the district, and the Mikonui- Race in particular." Mr Moran seconded the motion, which was carried. Mr Yorwarth moved — "That a Printing Committee be appointed, consisting of Messrs Lockington, Malfroy, Healy, and the mover, to devise the best means of having the prospectus and other necessary printing done." Mr Hunter seconded the motion, which was carried. The following gentleman were appointed Provisional Directors:— Messrs Sim, Kidwill, Grimmond, * Healy, Siraou, Yorwarth, Lockington, Crowley, Moran, Costello, White, and M'Key. Mr Malfroy

was appointed manager, pro tern; J. B. Lopas, Secretary; Union Bank, Bankers; Messrs Button and Reid, Solicitors. The meeting then adjourned. — Ross Guardian.

A miner named Lind, of Lenorda and party's claim, Dillman's Town, was brought down to the Kumara Hospital with his left leg smashed.

The landlord of the Wharf Hotel, Greymouth, Mr James Jones, has announced his intention to draw a £2000 derby sweep on the Melbourne Cup.

Mr Croumbie Brown has been advised, in consequence of the inclemency of the weather and the excitement in connection with the forthcoming election, to postpone the delivery o£ his lecture.

The sceptic often stands in the way of advancement, but he may not always have his own way— the irresistible force of truth overwhelms him, and he often becomes the convert. Let all who are doubting the efficacy of " Ghollah's Great Indian Cukes," but notice the extraordinary effect they have in restoring the sick to health, and they will join the geueral high opinion formed of their merits. Testimonials received from all parts of the Colony, .incontrovertibly prove these Indian Medicines to be the finest in the world . Sold by G. Mcc, Revell-street.

For miraculous cures by the use of Eucalypti Extract, read fourth page — [Advt.l

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18780626.2.4

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1878., West Coast Times, Issue 2879, 26 June 1878

Word Count
2,680

West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1878. West Coast Times, Issue 2879, 26 June 1878

Working