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West Coast Times. FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1878,

T^hk ratepayers of the Arahura Road District should certainly take some steps to put an end to the present state of affairs, as regards their Road Board. r j^hi3 Board is practically defunct, the County Council having taken over all the roads and tracks in that district, and the Board itself having done no \york to speak of for a year or more. Nevertheless, they have still retained a cler.k to do nothing, at £5 a week, and^ as if {his, w ; a,9 apt enough, they, at a recent meeting, voted him £20 a month for ten months, as. compensation, if the Road Board w%s, dissolved. At the time this was. done, the Board had large debts, and their dishonored cheques were to, be found in every direction ; b,u<j it was intended, to saddle the County with the liability. Ths arrears of salary due to the clerk, and the compensation voted, would of themeelves make a tolerable, amount for the Council to take over, but it was stated in the Council on Wednesday that if all the claims against the Board were met, the Council would find perhaps : that £100,0 would not represent the total amount. Under these circumstanc.es the. Council wisely determined to iceep themselves safe. Indeed they would be utterly unable to take over the liabilities of the Board, if they reach the sum. stated. The ratepayers should at all events see that short work was made of the compensation and salary liability.

There was a meeting of the Hospital Committee at 8 p.m. on Wednesday. Present — The President (in, the chair), Messrs, Heinz, Fisher, Lin.Btro.in, Walker, Lyons, Upjohn, Stonebridge, and Dr Featherstonbaugh. The receipt of the sum of £40 from the Stafford Committee was ordered tp be acknowledged. A letter from the Town Clerkj enclosing a copy of the minutes of the conference on charitable aid, was read. and_ received. It was resolved to forward the. following resolution to the Mayor.:— "That the number 7 be struck out, and number 9 substituted in the second resolution." It was also resolved on the motion of Mr Lyons, that the, Committee aje of opinion that £400 should be. contributed .by the Borough Council. The surgeon's report, and the list of discharges, of out- door patients were read and received, after which the meeting terminated.

The County Council will meet at two p.m. to-day.

A meeting of electors favorable to the return of Mr Seymour Thome George is called for this evening at eight o'clock at the Empire Hotel.

The Oddfellows will giye a ball this evening at Stafford. All, the arrangements are complete^ and a, l^rge attendance is expected.

ol tlie County Council for the Totara Riding will probably take hia seat at the Council meeting to-day. Mr Button has, we unflevstanfj, finally decjded, not to. contest (.he forthcoming tileqtipn.

{n another column is publishec] Mr George's •jcjilrtas. to the, electors. . I(i a day or two Mr George "will explain his views fully in the various centres of population.

. Mr Pearce, one of the two survivors of the Loch Ard, is said to be a son of Captain Pearce, late of the Gothenburg.

The County Council give notice, in this days issue of intention to strike a rate of one shilling in the £ on the rateable property in the County, for the year ending 31st March 1879. The rate will only realize £900, if all collected.

Mr Tpnks, of Greymoutl], announces a sweep of £2000 on the Sydney Metropolitan Liace. Particulars are to be seen in another column. Tickets can be had of Mr Harris, Oafe de Paris ; Mr Hanseu, and Mr Keller.

Tenders are invited by the County Couqcil from competent persons willing to collect the dog tax for the current year, in the several road districts or ridings of the County.

Tenders were accepted on Wednesday by the County Council, as follows: — For the construction of bridge over Saltwater Creek Okarito, J. Johnson of Hokitika ; maintenance of Paringa track, J. Bonnerman, faringa ; repairs of the track between Little and Big Wanganui, Patrick Clare, Ross. In accordance with the usual custom the amounts of the tenders are withheld till the contracts are sigqed, when the particulars of all the tenders will published.

The New Zealand Herald prints the following offer of a house during the session at Wellington, received by an Auckland M.H.R., and suggests that the expenditure of the honorarium is thus easily accounted for: -" Sir, — As I presume you will be in Wellington attending the session before long a I have taken the liberty of addressing you relative to my house, wkich I intend to let furnished while Parliament is being held. The position is high and healthy, and extremely private. The situation is as gpod as — — . The interior consists of six rooms aud kitchen, water aud gas laid on ; and the rent will range from £8 to £10 per week."

On all sides indignant protests have been evoked by the absurd attempt of the Bank of New Zealand to restrain the clerks in their employment from indulging in the manly and vigorous exercise of football. A good deal of chaff has been showered on the " Old ladies of Wyndham-street," particularly in Dunedin papers. " Muff" writes to the Star as follows: — " Sir, — I rejoice to see that the Bank of New Zealand authorities in Auckland are determined to put their veto on that ' brutal and demoralising game' — football. So far their care for their employees is most praiseworthy, but in the opinion of most of those employed, they do not go far enough. Boating ought also to be put down. If the Auckland Board were to pass a resolution to the effect that any employee drowned while out boating would not be permitted to remain in the service, it would have a most salutary effect. Surely if young men play croquet and billiards, and take a little gentlo exercise in the public thoroughfares of an afternoon, they ought to be quite satisfied. \Vo ought all to be thankful, sir, at the action of the Bank of New Zealand; and I, for one, hope they will gefc the praise they deserve." There is no doubt that the rules under which football is commonly played in this country are susceptible of a good deal of modification, but that is no reason why youths should be debarred from a pleasant health-giving pasttime. We presume the Bank will at ouce issue instructions that none of its servants are to attend Hunt Club or Steeplechase Meetings, never venture to touch a gun or face a cricket ball. If the Bank wished to drive its clerks to tlie fascinations of the more scientific but expensive game of billiards and the temptations of the barroom and dice-box, they could not have uhoseu a better method. We trust that calmer judgment will lead them to revoke tin order that will only bo laughed to scorn by all lovers of a game demanding something more than the ability to smoke a cigar or knock a croquet ball about.

The " Loafer " of the Christchurch Press says : — A Tasmanian frieud of mine, who was in Canterbury, recently saw in the papers an account of a big rush in the tight little island. He thought of going thither, but wishing to feel sure the reports were correct, he wired to a friend in Hobart Town, "Is Rush reliable." In answer, his frieud replied, " Rush entirely unknown here." By next boat my friend received a long letter from Tasmania, in which his correspondent informed him he had made enquiries all over the island, aud could hear nothing of any business man named Rush, nor had there been so far as he knew any commercially or iinposterial party of that name in Tasmania during the memory of man. Thus we learn it is best to make telegrams intelligible if possible. It was a most humiliating sight to witness a man worth. £10,000 standing for half an hour at the telegraph counter, thinking till the perspiration bathes his thick head how he can best the Government out of two pence. The number of people who prefer being telegraphically unintelligible for the sake of say sixpence, would fill St. Peter's at Rome, and many of them wouldn't be much ornament to the edifice when they were there.

The Dunedin Star says:— Mr A. R. Eva, who for some time was connected with the Telegraph Department in that city, has been promoted to the charge of the Hokitika office.

The Frank J. Smith, arrested in Wellington, was not a solicitor but an accountant in Melbourne., who absconded with £102 belonging to a grocer, of Carlton.

The Rev. Mr Somerville and his son, Jeffc New Zealand on the 30th May. They completed thejr mission at Invercargill, and left the Bluff per Albion for Hobart Town.

During a discussion on the gas question by the Dunedin City Council last week, Mr Roberts stated that the Gas Works -were being managed, at a loss, the present deficit being at the rate of four-thousand pounds a year.

A correspondent of the Thames Adver" tiser, referring to the new Katikati settlement says: — " The block o£ land, containing 10,300. acres (more or loss) bought by Mr Versey Stewart from the Government, on

\ certain terms, is now boing surveyed and cut up into blocks, varying from 15 to 320 acres. I know, from having travelled over it, that ther° is some good land in the lower portions of the block towards the. sea or liarhpr frontages, but I cannot help pitying spme of those poor devils who have to exist, or rather try j;o exist, oil some of the hill tops which $re- now being laid out in farms, in readiness to receive the new chums." The "Edgar girJs" (says the Auckland Herald) give, fair promise of heing the most renowned of their sex for scholastic attainments in New Zealand. Not twelve months ago the degree of B.A was formally presented to Kate Edgar, the daughter of the Itev. Samuel Edgar, of this city, and now fhe telegraph tells of her sister Margaret having won a University scholarship, and thus making a long step jjpwards the high honor which her sister seaured. All praise tq the training, the brains, aud the perseverance which produces such results. These girls are examples of what woman's abilities can accomplish,, and. wo hope others of their sex, seeing what they have done, wijl strive to go and do likewise. Miss M. B. Martin, a daughter of Johq . Martin, Esq., J.P., of Wellington (says the Times) has the honor of being the only young lady south of the line who has passed the Cambridge local examination for 1877. Miss Martin'sHiame heads the third cjags. She was a pupil of Miss Greenwood. The total number of girls last year who were examiued was 1308 and they represented all parts of the empire. Of these only 352 paseed, 558 satisfied the examiners, and 73 satisfied them in preliminary subjects only. We congratulate Miss Martin on the distinguished honor of representing the Australian Colonies in the honor Hat. The sceptic often stands in the way of advancement, but he may not always haye his own way— the irresistible force of truth overwhelms him, and he often becomes the convert. Let all who are doubting the efficacy of " Ghqllah's ' Great Indian Cubes," but notice the extraordinary effect they have in restoring the sick to health, and they will join the general high opinion formed of their merits. Testimonials . received from all parts of the Colony, incontrovcrtibly prove these Indian Medicines to be the finest in the world. Sold by G. Mcc, ltevell-street.

Mr Grimmond the newly elected member

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18780614.2.7

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1878,, West Coast Times, Issue 2870, 14 June 1878

Word Count
1,956

West Coast Times. FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1878, West Coast Times, Issue 2870, 14 June 1878

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