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West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1878.

The writ for the election of a member to represent the Hokitika district in the General Assembly reached the Returning Officer yesterday, and is made returnable on the llth of July. There is* therefore, much less time than was anticipated for candidates to buckle on their political armour. The nomination day has been fixed for Thursday, the 20th instant, aud the election day for the Wednesday following, viz., 26th Junei The reason for hurrying on the election is doubtless the early meeting of Parliament. It ia desirable that the Dew candidate, whoever he may be, may be present, at the opening or the session, and the writ being returnable in a month from the date of its receipt, the Returning Officer has given the full limit that could safely be given, in compliance with the Act. The candidates now before the constituency are four in number. We have already dealt with Mr G. Gr. JPitzGerald, in too truthful terms, and will take occasion to do so again ere the election is over. There are besides Mr George and Mr PitzGerald, two other aspirants to the honor of representing Hokitika in Parliament. Taking them in the order of their announcements, we have first Mr Croumbie-Brown, who for some occult reaßou imagines that he ba& a chance of success. Very little is known about this gentleman beyond the facts, that he is, or was, on the staff of the Kumara Times, that he met with a coach accident, and that he enjoys the position of plaintiff in a libol action in

which the Rev. Father Hennebery is defendant. We hardly think that these are claims on the constituency. Mr Croumbie Browne is in reality almost a stranger in the district. He is in the same position as Mr George so far, but if elected he would not posses a tithe of the latters's influence and power to do good for the place he represents. Mr Brown's great platform is secular education, which is only what one would expect ' from a gentleman who is N pursuing the Rev. Mr Hennebery for damages. We do not think Mr Brown has the slightest chance of success, and he is either grossly deceiving himself, or has been grossly deceived. However, the field is open, and the veriest screw may come to the starting post. Mr Andrew Cumming, an old, well-known, and respected resident on the Coast, also offers his services to the electors. He has made no announcement yet of his views, but it may be presumed he also will give a " general support" to the Grey Ministry. The opposition candidate still keeps dark, and it is not likely that any opponent of the Grey Ministry will come forward. Mr Button is talked of, and indeed a requisition is to be presented to him, which we do not believe he will accede to Next we come to. Mr Seymour Thorne George, who has received a numerously signed requisition from the electors, to which he has briefly replied, acceding to their request, and promising that he will in a day or two publish an address conveying an outline of his opinions oo the various questions of policy of immediate" interest to the Colony. He has also promised that he will, immediately ou the writ being issued, visit the district and aSord the electors every opportunity of judging of his views, and of his capabilities for the position. He may therefore be expected to reach here on Saturday, or Monday next at latest, when he will address the electors at as many centres of population as time will admit. Already we have heard from our contemporary, i?[\QiStar, all that -can be said or imagined, unfavorable to his candidature. But we would ask our contemporary to point to any better man in the field. Iv our opinion all tho candidates, preseut or prospective, are pretty well certain to run in the interests of the Grey party. Therefore to harp on the extraordinary circumstance "that people should be so led away by the Grey mania," will be found useless iv the coming contest. Surely our contemporary's lengthened acquaintance with Mr FitzGerald cannot have influenced him iv that gentleman's favor. Not a word of sound argument has been used against Mr Seymour George's candidature. The chief

points against him seem to be that his uncle is Premier of the Colony, and that he is a noa-resident. We see no reason why a candidate should not have an uncle, and if the relationship moves the uncle to help on the nephew, who shall say nay 1 If there were an equally desirable candidate resident iv this district ir, would bo advisable for the electors to give him their support. But we contend that not one of the others offering is a desirable candidate. Non-residence, in a legislator, does not always mean apathy with regard to the interests of the district represented. When Mr Grisborne contested the Totara seat, a cry of non-residence was raised. Mr Gisborue was, However, fortunately, as subsequent events proved, elected. He has done as much for the benefit of the Totara district as any resident could possibly do. He has given satisfaction, indeed, iv every respect. We admit that Mr George is not a tried politician. But he is, we have reason to believe, able aud energetic. He possesses the will to serve the district, and his surroundings indubitably indicate that, if returned, he cannot fail to have the power to do so. The objections against him so far, are of the very faintest and vaguest character. On the whole, taking the candidates at a fair value, Mr Seymour Thorne George is decidedly, in our opinion, the most eligible.

We have already referred to the necessity which exists for subsidizing or employing a steam-tug for this port, and we are glad to observe that the Harbor Board have taken the matter under their consideration. At present the rates of towage are so high that except in the case of vessels coming here fully laden, they are practically prohibitory. Numbers of vessels partly laden would frequent Hokitika for the sake of the return freight of timber, if the towage charges were reduced. The consequence would be that the timber trade would receive a great impetus. The demand for timber is great, aud providing the price of it were lowered, labor in the neighborhood of Hokitika would be much more in demand than it is now. In fact the high towage rate has strangled our local timber trade. The Harbor Board has recognised this, and if the Act under which they are constituted, will permit, they intend to take steps towards subsidizing a steam tug. One of the members of the Board rightly expressed his opinion that the local bodies — the County and Borough Councils — should be appealed to for assistance towards this object. An increase in population would of necessity increase their revenues, but, indeed, the subject so nearly concerns the welfare of this place, that very little pressing should be wanted to cause them to give what they could in aid. We are quite aware that the Harbor Board is unable to undertake this work alone. Their funds will not permit. The harbor works which are on the point of being started, will not be completed for a long time to come. In the meantime the trade of the port is languishing aud gradually dying away. A reduction in tho price of

towage will, it is confidently believed, revive it. We trust the Board will set to work energetically and devise some means of rendering- this port more easy of access than it has hitherto been.

We have now four candidates in the field for the vacant sent— Messrs George, FitzGerald, Crouuibie-Brown, and Cutntning. There is a probability of a decision being arrived at by Mr Button to-day, that gentleman not having yet been presented with the requisition asking him to contest the election. So far all the candidates are in the Grey interest, or, rather, say they are.

At the Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday, before Dr Giles, E.M., James and John Fleming, and Thomas and John Roberts, four larrikins, were charged with creating a disturbance on Gibson's Quay. James Fleming was fined £1, John Fleming 10s, while the two other boys were, on account of their youth, discharged with a caution. A few undefended debt cases were decided, after which the Court adjourned.

.The Westlaud portion of the San Francisco mail arrived in town at eleven a.m. yesterday, by coach, from Grey mouth, and was promptly sorted and delivered by the Post Office officials.

There will be a meeting of the County Council at two p.m. to-day. About 1800 salmon fry were safely deposited iv the Hokitika, Arahura, and Kokotahi rivers last night. The fish arrived at about 6.30 p m., by the Waipara, from Greymoutb, and were received by Meßsrs Bonar, H. L. Eobinson, the County Chairman, and other gentlemen, on arrival at the wharf, in splendid condition, there not being an unhealthy fish amongst them, and the whole of them being most lively and vigorous. Since the last consignment was received, the young fry have grown to a good size, some of them being from four to six inches in length. They were, on being landed, transferred into 10 gallon tins, which were swung across express waggons, and carried to their destination. About 800 of the fry were taken in this way to the Arahura river in charge of Mr A. King, of Learmontb and Co's office, aud were set at Jiberty above the bridge. The remainder were liberated iv the Hokitika river above Glosßop's, and in the Kokatahi river near Graham's by Messrs ltae anil Dale. There was not one sickly or dead fish in the tins after the journey over the Kanieri road although it was, owing to the late rains, somewhat rough. Altogether upwards of (7000 fry have vow been liberated in the Hokitika, Teremakau, Kanieri, Kokotahi, and Arahura rivers, so that the fislAmght to be thoroughly acclimatised in these waters, in a few years' time. Captain Bignell, of the Waipara, is eutitled to tbe thanks of the community for the attention on different occasions to the interesting cargo ho so kindly undertook to land here.

The Receiver-General, through the medium of the New Zealand Gazette, makeß the following acknowledgement :— " Treasury* Wellington, 30th May, 1878. — The ReceiverGeneral acknowledges the receipt, on the 4th instant, of «an envelope posted in Sydney, addressed to the Collector of Customs at Auckland, aud coutaining two one-pound notes of the Oriental Bank, Sydney, with a slip attached bearing the words ' Conscience Money.' "

Letters of Naturalization have been issued to Thomas Field, labourer, of Hokitika.

The Westport Times says: — "Professor Hennicke and Madame Stella will not go t') Charleston. The professor telegraphed there for a conveyance, but the owner asked a fare that started. the professor into telegraphing a reply. " Thank you ! I don't want to buy your trap."

The following is from the Wellington Post :—": — " There was a curiously muddled election took place the other day to supply a vacancy in the Waiohine River Board. Mr Boys was proposed and seconded, but declined to stand, Mr Braggins was then proposed, but the nomination was not seconded. Then Mr Payton was proposed by Mr Boys, and Mr Bragging seconded the nomination. The returning officer thereupon (in mistake) called for a show of hands for Mr Boys, who bad declined to stand. The returning officer spoke very low, and the people thought the show of hands called for was for Mr Payton, and all hands were held up, including that of Mr Boys. Then a show of hands was called for Mr Payton, when the mistake became evident, and everything got " mixed " and crooked. Mr Boys protested that he would not stand; Mr Payton did ditto, but the returning officer shut them all up by declaring- Mr Boys to have been duly elected. Thus it comes about that the unhappy J. E. I. Boys, who Btoutly declared that he would not stand "because he had already "been in not water long enougn, and would not go into cold," has been elected a menjber of the Waiohine River Board against his will. This is an appalling illustration of " what may happen to a man in New Zealand."

The following " eclectic" statement lately appeared in a Wellington paper:—" £5 (Five Pounds) Reward. Medium of Slander. The prey of envy, hatred, malice, and all uucharitableness, by reason of its subjugating effect; obstructed in. every scene of life; now, victim-made afresh; by the Workingmen's Club Committee for keeping the national object propounded to the authorities 'for its immunity before it'; I offer my Bond for £5 as Reward for written evidence, which, bearing cross-examination, shall lead to conviction of libellous asseveration against my good name and fame— one common birthright divine of all; also half (additional) of all pecuniary satisfaction recovered through the law by its aid. I cheerfully (more than) pledge my word for this — because defamation is rife— and very many pave their way, usurp the using power, and ' walk with slanders.' Address — Henry Cor bett, General Post-office."

Under the heading of "Notice to the public," the proprietor of the Wellington Chronicle thus humbly speaks of his own personal movements and operations :—": — " I intend going on the next steamer for San JTrancisco to settle up my business there, re. turning thence by the steamer which leaves about the 10th of July, bringing my family with me to New Zealand. WUat effect this may have on their deßtiny, or on tlie future prospects of this colony, lam unable at the present moment to state,— time alone can tell. But this I can Ray, with the utmost

safety, that the effect of such a happy occurrence will be something electrical in its results, and prove most beneflcial in every respect, — so far as lam individually concerned. All my energies will bo increased in a wonderful degree, and I will have new. life infused into my veins."

The New Zealand Heraldsays: — " Amongst the Maoris it is thought that a salary of £500 a year is too small for Tawhiao, while Europeans are generally of opinion that £10 a week is handsome for doing nothing, to a man who has no position to maintain, and who does not need to keep a gig to vouch for his respectability, who does not drink, and whose favorite food is potatoes aud pork. It is contended, however, that Tawhiao has a position to maintain, and that he must be hospitable, while, as he has four wives, there must be many sudden demands on his purse We shall ace whether the Waikatos will stipulate for a higher salary for Tawhiao , and if they do, what reasona they will give."

A notable instance of the facility with which fires may be caused and the difficulties of accounting for their origin, occurred at Johnson's Hotel (says the Southland Times). The afternoon's sun was sniaing through one of the windows of a private parlor, and its rays fell upon a circular water bottle, which stood upon a table. The bottle had apparently acted as a ' burning glass,' for the beams conver ged to a focus upon a worsted mat lying close by tho bottle, and when the room was entered it was found that the mat had become ignited, and a hole as large as a crown piece burnt in it. Subsequently experiments with a match showed that a flame could be produced in less than a minute. Perhaps this may account f ot many fires whose origin has remained wrapped in mystery .

At the Arrow Flat on the 22th ult., while a miner named Thomas Corner, in company with two other men, was skating on a lagoon, he observed under the ice a black -looking object. On taking it up he found that it was a parcel wrapped in a piece of black French merino cloth, and tied with a piece of cord. When another of the men opened it, it was found that it contained the body of a female child, enclosed ia an old piece of flaunel. An inquest was held on the body at Arrow, before the Coroner for the district, Mr H, A. Stratford, and the medical evidence given went to show that it had been stillborn. There was no evidence brought forward as to who was the mother of the child, or as to who had placed it in the lagoon.

The method of making money is now ascertained to be on mathematical principles. The moneyed men of the present day have for tbe most part succeeded, by producing really valuable articles, and adding to industry honesty. These principles hold good all over the world, aud tbe success attending the introduction of those invaluable medicines, " Ghollau's Great Indian Cures," into New Zealand is another instance of proof of the assertion. The public have recognised the worth of these Indian Medicines, arid the cure effected by their use are extraordinary. Get testimonials aud the medicines of the Chemists.

Holloioay's Pills and Ointment. — All diseases springing from bad blood< malarious districts, or overheated atmospheres can be cuued by these noble remedies. Fever ague, influenza, bronchitis, diptheria, stomach complaints, and bilious disorders, are easily met and readily conquered by these unrivalled medicaments. Both act harmoniously in preserving the pure and best materials of the body, and in expelling all that is redundant, effete, or corrupt. Thus the cure is not slight and ephemeral, but complete and permanent, as thousands who have personally tested their power have gratefully testified. Invalids in all quarters of the globe, whose iistlcssness of mind and sallowness of complexion warned them and their friends of some undermining disease, have been thoroughly renovated by Holtoway's remedies.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1878., West Coast Times, Issue 2868, 12 June 1878

Word Count
2,977

West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1878. West Coast Times, Issue 2868, 12 June 1878

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