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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

West Coast Times. TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1878.

The near approach of the election day haß stirred the dry bones of Westland, and instead of a dearth of candidates, it is quite possible that we shall have a large, if not a very eligible lot, to choose from. In -accordance with an intention expressed yesterday, we now proceed to offer a few remarks upon the candidature of the gentleman who was the first to definitely announce himself. At t^he ! outset we must confess to a feeling of surprise and regret that Mr Gerard George FitzGerald has been so ill-advised as to offer his services to this constituency. Whether he asks our suffrages as the representative ol any particular party, or simply comes forward because he has nothing to do, it is the duty of every right thinking man to protest against— what we consider his candidature to be-r-an insult to the community. Already we have been taken to task for suggesting that it would be worthwhile to accept the offer of Mr Seymour Thome George, to express his views to the electors in the absence of a desirable local candidate. The desirable local candidate is still wanting. Mr FitzGerald is admittedly an able man, aud that said, all that is possible is said in his favor. '.. But surely ability is not the only test of a man's fitness to occupy, a seat in Parliament. MiMichael Prendergasf, returned once for a Victorian constituency, was an able man. Mr Edward Jerningham Wakefield, the whilom disreputable member for Christchurch, was a man of conspicuous talents. And what was the consequence of returning 1 them to Parliament ? Each became* a byeword and a scoff, disgracing the constituency he represented. Their talents, oertainly in the instance of one far superior to Mr EitzGerald's, covered a multitude of sins, but their tendency to prostrate themselves in the mud was incurable. With two such notorious examples, before pur eyes, would it not be outrageous to follow them ? Mr FitzGerald tells us that he will give a "general support" to the Grey Ministry. If he be sincere in this intention his convictions have undergone a rapid change, and he is a man of most forgiving disposition. We have all alongbeen under the impression that he wa3 a firm believer in the Atkinson Government. He ought to be if he has any gratitude in his composition. The Atkinson Ministry were guilty of no greater wrong to this town than by retaining Mr FitzGerald in office here as long as they did. Had Sir George Grey remained, in the cold shade of opposition, Mr FitzGerald would have remained Resident Magistrate to this very day. But the Grey Ministry made short work of him. They listened to no back-stairs whispers, and regarded not the telegrams so industriously sent to them by persons in semi-official, positions in Hokitika, who had strong reasons for keeping him in power. They dealt with the charges brought against Mr FitzGerald on their merits, and so relieved the public of a burden they had borne long and unwillingly. For these mercies Mr FitzGerald tells us he ; will certainly give the Grey Ministry «. a general support !" Can he be believed ? Is he the sort of man Who, hayibg ; received a cuff on one cheek, will offer the other to the smiter? The electors are now asked to return- a gentleman to Parliament who is rightly considered unfit for the public service, who was, iv fact, if not in name, dismissed for conduct for which there is no excuse. He is quite competent to be a member of the House, but incompetent to sit on the Magistrate's Bench ! Is Parliament become a refuge for the destitute ? Is the Insolvency Court a half-way house to the Legislature ? Does a long experience of questionable company tend to qualify a man to represent a largo constituency in Parliament ? Mr FitzGerald is well known to every one in Hokitika arid; on the Coast. Why should he show his contempt for this constituency by offering them his services ? His influence witli the present Government would be worse than

worthless. He has never shown any interest in public matters. His unfortunate tendencies raise a barrier between the rest of the world and himself, which will always exist. We protest strongly against the erroneous theory that he can be of any service to us in any capacity. His notorious infirmity is far too Btrong for his ability, and a similar failing has often overcome men of far heavier metal than he carries. A Grladstoue, with Mr' FitzGerald's weakness so conspicuously developed, ought to be unhesitatingly rejected by any constituency. We regret the necessity for this plain speaking. It is not our desire to throw water on a drowned rat, or jump on a man when he is down. But it is a duty we owe to the public to point out, that feelings of compassion should be discarded when a representative is to be chosen. He should be a man whom the electors can respect. Their pity for human infirmity should not lead them to assist in exhibiting that infirmity within the walls of Parliament. It is already boasted that Mr FitzGerald is put forward by a party. If this be found to be the truth there is one way of avoiding the scandal of being represented by him. Steps ought to be taken by those who have the welfare of the district at heart to induce the other candidates, save one, to resign. Let the one so choßen, whoever he may be, fight out the battle with Mr FitzGerald and there would be no fear of the result. We care not whether Mr Button, Mr George, or Mr Anyoneelse be selected, so long as the candidate's reputation is untarnished, and his abilities fair. The return of Mr FitzGerald for this district would be a deplorable calamity.

Mr Seymour Thorae George is announced in another column as a candidate for the General Assembly election for this district. We nary stite thai he is expee'ed .to reach hero in a week or so. The Hon. Mr Sheehan will v?sifc the district at the same time.

A new warder named Wilson, was lately appointed on probation to the Hokitika Gaol, and on accompanying the prisou gang to work outside he was informed by Wardy? Ferguson that one of the prisoners was bsnty tempered and required waiching. The new warder in place of keeping the information to himself j acquaint ad the prisoner of what he was told. He likewise laid some charges against Warder Ferguson, who lias been in the establishment for nearly twelve yeavs. On enquiry it was found that the informant's statement could not be substantiated, and his services were summarily dispensed with yesterday.

There will be a meeting of the Benevolent Society this afternoon at 4 o'clock, at the Jury Room.

The County Council meet to-morrow, at 2 pm. Although it is only a fortnight since the previous meeting there is a very considerable amount of business to be disposed of. There will be a meeting of the Borough Council at 2 p.m . to-morrow.

Two or three Hokitika larrikins will appear at the Resident Magistrate's Court this morning on a charge of breaking windows.

We learn that the Rev. Father Martin mentioned to his people on Sunday last that about £200 had already been received as voluntary subscriptions to the convent fund. The committee intend proceeding with the work at once, and will also take immediate bteps to get in the balance of the subscriptions promised. The movement iB likely to meet with hearty support, and full partioulars respecting tenders aud specifications may be 6e«n as advertised in another column.

The quantity of coal shipped from the port of Greymouth last week, was 505 tons, all shipped coastwise.

The replies already received, we understand, to the County Chairman's circular inviting the Councils to assembly in conference on the 21st July, relative to improvements in the County system and the amendment of the Counties Act, are nearly in every instance of a favorable charaoter, and the whole of the Councils, except that of the Grey, have decided to Bend delegates to it, so a very large assemblage will take place. The Provincial Buildings, in Wellington, have been secured for the conference. At the meeting of the County Council to-morrow, a representative, from the Westland Council must be appointed, and it is to be hoped that the County Chairman will be In a position to announce his readiness to comply with the wish of the Council, aud of the County residents, and attend the conference. The representative of the Wostlaud Council will have a great deal of the responsibility thrown upon him, and will oocupy a prominent position at the meeting.

The Directors of the Hokitika Quartz Mining Company last evening accepted a tender at per foot for driving, the tunnel for the company. Operations therefore will now be forthwith comraeucccl. It is anticipated that the tunnel will bo driven to the reef in about two months time. The price for the work is withheld until the contract is signed.

Mr D. Lundon, Collector of Customs at Greymouth, is to be removed to Waflganui, to take charge of the Customs department there, and Mr Woon, of Wanganui, takes charge at Greymouth.

The prisoner Levy, who is undergoing a long sentence in the gaol, has of lute become again troublesome to the officers of the institution. The Visiting Justicos, Dr Gileß, R.M., and Messrs Bonar asd Reid, had one or two charges to deal with yesterday, when Levy was ordered to do penance on bread and water in solitary confinement for 48 hours on one of. the ohargee, and 24 hours on another.

The application of Mr Nelson, o£ Cement Town* in the Inangahua district, for a hotel license was opposed by Mr Cros3, solicitor, on behalf of Mr Edward O'Brien. The objector gave very atrong eviderace, stating that Mr Nelson encouraged profligate oharacters, closing up his house for dajs, that he encouragcl gambling, atul after making men stupidly drunk took advantage of them, that a single nobbier, or at most two of his liquors would make a man insensible, that, the applicant got; drank frequently, that the house was filthy, andthebedclinp, rotten, and flyblown, &<>., &a.

A parcel of iron sand from Taranaki is to be sent to England for Sir John Coode, who intends to have experiments made to teßt its commercial value.

The Wellington Licensing Bench sets its face against the creating of more publichouses, and lately refused nine out of ten applications for new licenses.

The Waimate County is wealthy indeed. It possesses a credit balance of forty-seven thousand pounds.

An Engineer Corps is being formed in Invercargill.

A subscription list has been started at Tapanui, Otago, towards the erection of a hospital there.

A gentleman named Macdonald, who is the second master of the Edinburgh High School has been appointed Rector of the Duuedin High School.

The Hinemoa recently brought down from Auckland to Wellington new copper coins to the value of £500 for the banks, the bulk nearly filling one of the cabiiiß.

A novel method of enforcing the payment of the dog tax is about to be attempted in Bruce County, viz., to publish the name 3of dog owners who have paid those fees, and also of those who have not done so.

The Corporation of Port Chalmers are calling for tenders for a special loan of £10,000, authorised under the Port Chalmers' Water Works Act. The currency of the loan is for thirty years, at 7 per cent in- j tereßfc. ]

The Customs duties collected at the Port of Lyttelton for the month ending May 31st 1878, was £10,059, 193 Bd, as against £14,874 12s lid collected in the corresponding month of the previous year, showiug an increase of £4184 6s lOd. A Christchurch paper says that a Maori lately sent a telegram to the Native Minister complaining that a certain Boniface was witholdiug from him a pint of beer- He took the precaution to mark the telegram collect. A resident of Nelson named Howe has been suffocated through a piece of meat sticking in his throat. Whilst at dinner he was seized with what the family thought to be a fit, and expired before medical assistance could be rendered. A^os* mortem examination revealed the fact that a piece of meat had stuck in his wiud-pipe. We learn from the Surrey Journal that the well-known author of " Proverbial Philosophy," Martin Farquhtir Tupper, D.C.L. and M.A., intends visiting Australia and New Zealand, shortly, with the view of forming his own. opinions from actual observations on the position and prospect of colonists.

The special Wellington correspondents of the Press and the Lyttelton Times concur in the statement that Parliament will not meet till the end of It is further alleged that a section of the Cabinet were in favor of postponing the session to August, bat that the earlier date was decided upon by a majority of one.

The Auckland correspondent of the Lyttelton Times states that a French woman was charged at the Police Court with telling fortunes. Several blushing maidens from 17 to 20 had been brought forward by the police as witnesses against her, but she admitted the charge, and was discharged with a caution .not to offend again. For several years she ha 3 been making a living at the fortunetelling trade.

A fatal accident (says the Post) happened to an old man named Charles Meadows, who for many years past has been an inhabitant of Wellington. When coming down the steps leading to Flagstaff Hill, at about half-past eight o'clock, his foot slipped, and he fell to the bottom of the steps. It is presumed that the shock killed him, for when found a short time afterwards by two men named Vincent and Maby, he showed no signs of life, although the only wound visible was a slight cut over the right eyebrow. The men at once informed the police of the occurrance, and Dr. Harding was soon with the old man but he pronounced life to be quite extinct .

An honorable and gsllant member of tho Legislature, in journeying home in a railway carriage the other day, was charmed by a little thvee-ycar-oJd girl. " Will you conic home with me my pretty little maid ?" said the venerable legislator. "No fear, ' cocky,' " was the instant reply, whereat the legislator aghast, subsided, aud questioned the little girl no more. A well-known coach-driver next essayed to break the ice. He wore a fur coat and a fur cap, and asked the little girl a question. She did uot reply o it, but. looking at him said "You big pussy." The description was so true (adds the Lyttelton Times ) the driver also collapsed and left the little girl undisputed mistress of the situation.

We understand (says the Wellington Po3t) that his Worship the Mayor, in consequence of the startling result of the last kerosene test, has made arrangements to have all the kerosene now in bond thoroughly tested as a matter of public security. All the tests so far reported have been made on kerosene of Devoe's brand, that being deemed generally the safest and best. It is highly probable, therefore, that some of the other brands now in use many prove on testing to be equally unsafe, and the sooner the public anxiety on this head can be set at rest, one way or the other, the better. Dr Hector has expressed his readiness to assist the municipal authorities so far as possible in this direction.

The land sales in the Canterbury Provincial district lnst month realised £98,534.

A test of the beer brewed in Wellington has been made by the Government Analyst, and the three samples forwarded were found to be free from deleterious ingredients.

It is stated that the Colonial accounts for the present year will show that a great saving has been effected in the working of the railways, while there has. been a large increase in the revenue from that source.

The sceptic often stands in the way of advancement, but he may not always have his own way— the irresistible force of truth overwhelms him, and he often becomes the convert. Let all who are doubting the efficacy of " Ghollah's Great Indian Cores," but notice the extraordinary effect they have in restoring the sick to health, and they will join the general high opinion formed of their merits. Testimonials received from all parts of the Colony, incontrovertibly prove these Indian Medicines to be the fiucst in the world . Sold by G. Mcc, Rcvell-street.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18780611.2.6

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1878., West Coast Times, Issue 2867, 11 June 1878

Word Count
2,777

West Coast Times. TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1878. West Coast Times, Issue 2867, 11 June 1878

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