Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

West Coast Times. MONDAY, JUNE 3, 1878.

To suitably fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr Buttou, as member of the General Assembly, has been a matter of some anxiety to a few of the electors here, during the past few days. The writ is expected to reach here shortly from Wellington, and the nomination and election days will speedily follow. We may mention that a number of gentleman in town, and a deputation from one of the country districts, waited on Mr R. C. Reid, some days ago, asking that he might allow himself to be nominated and promising then* support, but the compliment was declined; on the ground that he could not at preseut conveniently leave his business to attend what will most probably be a very protracted session. Mr D. W. Virtue was likewise waited on with the same object, but that gentleman also assiged good reasons for not complying with the request made. So that it may be understood, neither Mr Virtue nor Mr Reid are to enter the field. It has also been stated that Mr Seddon is not disposed to contest the election, but on this we have no definite information. The name of Mr FitzGerald has been frequently mentioned, but from all we can learn, his candidature would not be likely to meet with general support. No other local candidate having been named, a telegram was forwarded by a gentleman in town to Sir George Grey, asking if he could suggest the name of some one of influence, who would be likely to creditably represent the constituency. To this the following reply was received on Saturday. "My nephew Seymour Thorne George would be glad to represent your district if you sent him a requisition asking him to do so. He was with me when I visited your district in February last." — Signed "G. Grey." Mr Gisborne, who was in hopes that one of the local men above mentioned would have stood, but as the writ will be immediately issued, and finding that no candidate has announced himself, telegraphed to a friend here as follows :—: — "Seymour Thorne George would

stand on requisition, He has very good qualifications, is young, intelligent and well educated. He is a nephew of Sir George Grey." Until it is determined to forward Mr George a requisition, we will withhold any comment on his chances of success. We must admit that wo would prefer seping an eligible local aspirant announce himself, to any one residing outside the district, but no one appears to crave the suffrages of tbe electors. There is a feeling among a large section of the electorate to ask Mr Button to again present himself, as many believe that the vote of the public meeting .was not indicative of the feeling or sense of the majority of the electors. Whether any step iv this direction will be taken we. are unable to say. If Mr Button could be induced to stand on the opposite ticket, and Mr George came forward iv the Grey interest, there is no saying what the result would be. It might then be seen that tho views of the Premier are not so generally acceptable in this district as many anticipated ; or the result might on the other hand, endorse the already expressed adherence to the policy of the Government in a more unmistakeable manner than was done at the public meeting a few weeks ago. The advisability of asking Mr Button to again stand has already been mooted, and though it is highly improbable that he would assent to any requisition which might be presented him, there would be nothing inconsistent in his doing so, if he holds the opinion that the resolution of the public meeting is not in conformity with the views of the majority of the electors. No doubt Mr Button would have many advantages, from his local kuowledge and full acquaintance with the requirements of the district, over any one who is a perfect stranger to the electors. And on whichever side of the House he would be seated, his advocacy on behalf of the constituency would commaud, as it has previously done, respect and attention. With no other local man iv the field, or likely to be, from present appearances, Mr George, from his intimate connection with the Premier, and possessing other qualifications so necessary, would in various respects be a desirable representative. Until, however, we hear something more of his views ou political questions, it is impossible to judge, with any degree of accuracy, what extent of support he would be likely to receive throughout the whole of the district.

A rush set in ou Saturday, to a place called Back Creek, about four miles from Woodstock, on the other side of the river, and about a mile and a half from any gold workings. The prospectors are men who went out under the auspices of the Kanieri Prospecting Association. The workings are at a terrace, and the wash dirt is reported to be eight feet thick. The prospects are considered fair, but nothing reliable is yet known. A considerable number of men are on the ground. It is conjectured that the ground will pay full wages, and there is a large extent of apparently auriferous country. The want of water haß hitherto greatly retarded operations, there being none nearer than a mile. The poll for the election of two Auditors for the Borough Council took place yesterday. There were five candidates, and the following was the rosult of the poll: — Mr Cuddeford, 98; Mr Harvey, 72; Mr Ord, 62; Mr Clarke, 56; and Mr Anderson, 21. The two first named are therefore elected. The remuneration for the auditorship is certainly absurdly low, and wliy it should bave been reduced from £10 10s— which is little enough — to £6s 6s most people are unable to guess. Mr Barff, M.H.R., intends addressing the electors at the Town Hall to-morrow evening afc 8 o'clock, when he will dilate upon th« events of the last session of the General Assembly. There will be a sitting of the District Court at ten o'clock this morniug. There is a considerable amount of business under the civil and bankruptcy jurisdiction of the Court. Inspector O'Donnell, who has served in the Westland Police Force since tlie opening up of the Coast in the year 1865, and who was previously in the Canterbury Police Force, has been, we learn, informed that his services are no longer required. No reason is assigned for this harsh and unfair proceeding-, and no one can even guess at a reason for it. If this is the way the Government are going to act towards old and faithful servants, the sorvice must become demoralized, and a reiga of terror will set in similar to tbat under the Berry regime in Victoria . The Directors of the Hokitika Quartz Mining Company (limited) met at Cooke's Pioneer Hotel on Friday evening to allot the shares applied for. There were present the Hon. J. A. Bonar (chair), Messrs H. L. 1 Robinson, Holmes, Craig, Cooke, Hansen, Hnworth, and Rae (hon. secretary). Owing to the largo number of shares applied for in excess of the number which could be allotted, several hours were spent in the effort to give eaGh applicant consideration. The total number of applications for shares was 310, and the number applied for (including the 2000 reserved for the prospectors) was 14,611, while the whole number to be allotted was, of course, only 12,000. Ultimately, the list was reduced down to the required number. The allotment commenced by the adoption of a resolution to exclude all minors and all applications for shares under the number of 25. The share list as made up is a very satisfactory one, and includes the principal men of the district, as well as a considerable number of persons residing at a distance. After the allotment some other formal business was done, and the meeting adjourned till this (Monday) evening at 8 p.m., to deal with tenders for driving tunnel. Mr J. A. Bonar announces a further ! reduction in the price of coals, which he is now prepared to deliver at his wharf at the rate of £1 5s per ton cash. Mr James E. Cuddeford has been temporarily appointed secretary of the Hokitika Quartz Mining Company. The work to be done was found to be much greater than Mr Virtue was prepared to undertake, especially

at the present time. A permanent appointment will be made at a meeting of shareholders to be called shortly. A sitting of the R.M. Court Goldsborough will bo held on Wednesday 12th inst, at 10 o'clock to hear applications from any person who considers himself aggrieved by his own name, or that of any other person, being entered on or omitted from the electoral roll of the Arahura riding. The quarterly meeting of the Licensing Court for the districts of Ilokitika aud Kanieri, will be held at the Resident Magistrate's Court, Ilokitika, to-morrow, the 4th June, at noon. A meeting of the shareholders of the Prince of Wales Quartz Mining Company, Taipo, will take place at the Phoenix Hotel, Kevell-street, on Thursdaj-, the 6th inst, to consider business of importance and other matters in connection with the company. A meeting of the directors of the Ilokitika Quartz Mining Company, is convened for this evening, at Cooke's Pioneer Hotel, at 8 p.m. The secoud of the Rev. Mr Elton's Penny Readings will take place at All Saints' Church School-room this evening. An examination o£ unclassified teachers, also of candidates wishing employment aa teachers in the Westland Public Schools, Hokitika and Greymouth, will take place simultaneously on Friday, 26th July, commencing at 10 a.m. Full particulars of the above can be seen in our advertising columns, or on application to the Inspector. The County Chairman has written to the Hon. Mr Macandrew and to the authorities of the Dunedin University urging the desirability of allowing Professor Ulrich the eminent mineralogist to visit and report on the silver miniug country of Mount Rangitoto. It is believed that such a visit would give a great impetus to the efforts to develope this district, and would be of benefit, not only to the comity, but to the whole colony. Professor Ulrich is himself quite familiar with the Government mines of Audreaaberg in the Hartz mountains, and it is said that the miueral characteristics of the Rangitoto country are ideutical to those of the mines in Germany, with which the Professor is familiar. The clever Raphael Troupe performed to a good house at the Duke of Edinburgh Theatre oa Saturday night. All the gymnastic and acrobatic feats were received with genuine and well deserved applause. " Little Joey," was at the conclusion of the entertainment called before the curtain , for his remarkable performance on the rope, walking across blind folded and enveloped in a garment to which appeared to the spectator to be akin to a night gown. His other tricks and tours deforce were all equally good. Miss Seliua is nearly equal to her brother and possesses much grace and nerve, which add greatly to the success of her feats. The small clown is very amusing and the entertainment certainly deserves a visit from those who have not seen this excellent company. This evening they perform for the last time in Hokitika for the benefit of the clown, and the little fellow decidedly ought to get a bumper house. A civil case of some interest, as containing an expression of opinion from the Bench as to the liability of unmarried women for debts contracted was heard at the R. M. Court, Wellington. Mr Cielaud sued a woman named Mrs Paulina for £5, amount of rent due. It appeared that ihe defendant was a widow, with two young children. She had no regular employment; but managed to support herself and family by " going out to work." Under these circumstances, she could make no promises as to payment of the defendant; aud his Worship said he would make no order, as persons should take the responsibility who gave women credit. He would adjourn the case sine die, and advised the plaintiff to make enquiries as to whether defendant had property, and if he found such to be the case, he could take proceedings accordingly. Some people talk a great deal about the high price which land and house property is fetching in Wellington, but the following extract from a letter which a leading citizen there received by last mail from a relative in London eclipses everything: — " You talk about your speculations in laud, &c, and making your £1000 or 1500. I will just tell you of a little affair, the accuracy of which I can vouch for. The Corporation of the City of London own a corner bit of ground, not in the heart of the city, about the size of the Trafalgar Hotel, Nelson. It was let by a tender for £2500 a year. The man who got it sold out, and made £2300 clear profit, The person who bought is building premises to cost ,£12,000, He sold his interest in the land or title to it and the building for £29,000. The person who bought sold again for £35,000, and this person, sold again for £35,000, and the building is not half finished yet. How do you like that idea of making money ? It licks trade into fits. There is lots of monoy^to be made here in the same way. There is one thing, land is always improving in value here, and, iv fifty year's time it will be worth half as much again as it is now." A correspondent writing to the Zealander gives the following recipe for preventing kerosene lamps from exploding. It is not new, but yet is not generally known :—: — " Take a teaspoonful of table or common salt, and drop this salt in the bottom of the globe or that part of the lamp containing the oil. The salt will neither dissolve nor evaporate, but remain intact. Let the lamp be daily charged with oil in the usual manner, the salt will still remain without requiring replenishing." The Westport Times says :— "The < rush' to the Totara has, to all intents and purposes colapsed, none but the original prospecting parties now remaining on the ground. The Addison's men after sinking several duffer holes have brought away their tools, ropes, and windlasses." A few days ago a telegram was received in Wellington from the police at Melbourne, stating that a man named Frank James Smith was charged on warrant with larceny, and that, in companion with a lady, he had left in the Albion for New Zealand. Upon the arrival of the Albion at Wellington on the afternoon of the 24th (says the New Zealander) it was ascertained by the police that Smith was ou board. Sergeant Smith proceeded on board the steamer and

arrested the abscondcr. It is not yet known what amount of money he is supposed to have misappropriated, but the papers in connection with the ease are expected hero by tho next Melbourne boat. Tho Mayor of Dunedin entertained the members and officers of the City Council, together with a number of the leading citizens to ti dinucr last week. Nearly 100 persons were the guests of hw Worship. The Her. Mr Dallaston, of Christchurch, contradicts the report about Mr Spurgeon's ill-health, he having recently received a letter from that gentleman, in which he stated that although ho had been ill, his health was now restored. The system of asphalt crossiugs, which has now had a fair trial iv Dunediu, has proved highly satisfactory, and is to be extended. Tho little girl Kiddle, who was kicked by a horse in South Dunediu some time since, has died in the Hospital. It would seem that Commodore Hoskins is about to go Home, for ia a letter to tho Auckland Herald lie says that he is afraid lie has paid his last visit to New Zealand. This very uuusal advertisement appeared in one of the Christchurch papers last week: " Lost, in a cab, paper parcel containing a plait of auburn hair. Finder rewarded." A sudden death occurred last week at Ashburton, Christchurch. Mrs Wyatt, residing in tho north end of the town, was fouod dead in her bed, having retired on the previous night apparently in her usual health. Disease of the heart is stated to have been the cause of death. Major Clare, Chairman of the Cambridge j District Board iv Aucklaud, has been fined 40s and costs for neglecting to furnish the County Council with particulars as to the amount of dog tax collected in his district. Twenty-nine nominations have been received by tho Dunedin Jockey Club for the Leger of 1880. It was decided, in order to save confusion, not to publish the list until the additional entries have been received from Christchurch. The Canterbury Board of Education has issued an instruction to teachers lo abstain from hitting any boy about the head, and that corporal lAinislmieiit shall be inflicted by the head-master only. Clement J. Carter, formerly a butcher in Christchurch, and who has been a member of the Otago Constabulary, has beeu sent down from Wellington to Christchurch, charged with deserting his wife at Christchurch, and with making a false statement to the registrar of births there. A Home paper reports that a peal of bells, costing £800, has bceu presented to the Catholic Church at Erdington, near Birmingham, by Mr F. Genders, who, "iv 1860, emigrated to Canterbury, New Zealand, and by thrift and perseverance was there enabled to acquire considerable property." The peal consists of eight bells, weighing iv all three and a half tons. The tenor alone weighs three-quarters of a ton. Mr G. Wright, ageut for Mr Gay lord Watson, a large publishing firm iv New York, is at preseut on a visit to Christchurch, with the view of obtaining the information necessary for compiling a complete directory of the States and Australia. The directory ia on a large scale, and the project seems well calculated to facilitate, what all admit is desirable, increased commercial intercourse between these colonies and the States. Mr E. George, of Christchurch, has a very ingenious invention on view at his shop, in the shape of a machine for lasting and stretching boots. It comprises several sizes all of which are worked by tlie one handle, and includes amongst other things a machine for raising the instep of a boot, for spreading the toes, and last but not least, by atiixing some pieces of brass, any one suffering from corns can have the foot so made as not to press upon them. The Auckland Star is responsible for the followiug : — A stout, red faced, independent looking man, who by his active and upright gait appeared as though he had been accustomed to a soldier's life aud had polished many a raw recruit, was resting yesterday with his back against the New Zealand Bank. A person was passing, unnoticed by the old identity of the 58th, and remarked, " George, howr awfully proud you get ; won't speak to a fellow now." "I should think not," replied George, " when I have the bank at my back." A saloon passenger by the Arawata, named liobert Watt, died on that vessel reaching the Bluff last week. Shortly after the vessel left Melbourne his conduct became so eccentric as to arrest the attention of his fellow passengers, aud it soon became apparent that he was suffering from a violent attack of delirium trcinens. Deceased, who only came out to Victoria by the Garonue a few weeks ago, ia supposed to be well connected, and it was understood that he was visiting this Colony with a view to making purchases of land. In his effects, which were numerous, was included a bank draft for £450. The method of making money is now :iscertaiued to be on mathematical principles. The moneyed men of the present day have for t!ie most part succeeded by producing really valuable articles, and adding to industry honesty. These principles hold good all over the world, aud the success attending the introduction of those invaluable medicines, " Ghollah's Great Indian Cukes," into New Zealand is another instance of proof of the assertion . The public have recognised the worth of these Indian Medicines, and the cure effected by their use are extraordinary. Get testimonials and tho medicines of the Chemists.

The Fiji Times is offended at the ignorance of that colony shewn by the outside world. It says :—" We have had occasion several times to notice the extensive knowledge possessed of Fiji and its geographical position by certain quidnuncs in other parts of the world, as evidence by the directions on parcels, papers, and letters passing through the Post-office ; but it remained for some component number of the tallest nation in the universe Sir-ec, to furnish a specimen of the most thorough benightedness on this subject yet encountered, as set forth in an address on a parcel lately sent for conveyance, and as follows :— ' Agent-General in London ; Sir Julius Yogel, K.C.M.G., 7, Westminster Chambers, New Zealand, Fiji.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18780603.2.6

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. MONDAY, JUNE 3, 1878., West Coast Times, Issue 2860, 3 June 1878

Word Count
3,535

West Coast Times. MONDAY, JUNE 3, 1878. West Coast Times, Issue 2860, 3 June 1878

Working