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West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1876.

It ib refreshing to find people who adopt the profession of journalism sensitive on ppiqts of honor. There is nothing more required in the conduct of journals than the behaviour of a gentleman and adherence to the truth. Cleverness in the composition of sentences, or in the telling of good or bad stories, should not be permitted to cover the sin'of telling lies. The old Scotchman who said that "it didn't matter, a damn whether it was true or no—it was a capital story " was, np doubt, a sinner, but, he was not a newspaper man. He chuckled over the joker-ras Scotchmen can, for twenty minutes, chuckle over a joke— but it was to him a matter of personal sensation '; b© di 4 not relate the story and distribute it to others as the truth. He was a Scotchman, and, according to the ordinary presumption, honest. Unfortunately in this country there are people who tell lies and are proud of being the authors, and of being distributors of the. same in public print. A few days ago we quoted frpm a paper called thp Greymouth Star a paragraph about Mr Eugene O'Conor, and were careful to preface it by saying that we supposed that it had first appeared in a Westport paper which we had not {he opportunity of seemg — believing that it had been written in Westport, and had some certain fppndatioh in truth. Jt. proves to h^ve been more fhan a, mere creation of intellectual imagination i It was a lie— written in an office in Grreymouth— some hundreds of miles away from the sceqe ; and the thanks which we receive for quoting it — perhaps a just retribution — and for acknowledging the authority, are conveyed in the following paragraph in the Greymouth, Star : —

The West Coast Times for months past has made it a rule never to acknowledge any paragraph taken from our columns, but as they treated other papers in a similar manner we concluded that it was their " principle " to make their readers believe that all articles appearing were original, so we took no notice of the petty thefis ; but in this morning's Times we fiad they appropriate matter from our columns, and in introducing it, say : •' We find the following in the Greymouth Star. Its source is not acknowledged, but it is probable that it is taken from a number of the Westport paper which has not reached Hokitika." Now the West Coast Times, not being able to make up a readable paper without borrowing from our columns, are quite welcome to take as much as they think proper, but we decidedly object to them thieving our locals, and at the same time insinuating that we also stole the paragraph. The matter referred to was written in our office, and not taken from another journal, but of course as tha West Coast Times appropriates articles from other, journals without acknowledgment \t Relieves other papers capable of doing the 'same, and consequently measures honest journals by its own questionable standard.

: Nothing need be said about this. Beyond this— this simple, sweet apostrophe : — Oh, you youth who wrote -this, ajid ye printers who permitted its insertion. Do you not know that you are : calling men who may be superior to yourselves, and whose honor, let us hope, is superior to yours, liars and thieves ? And do you think that that is language to use, or opinions to express, about any person: — as it is a person— possessing a " mind conscious toitself of right/' and acouple of hands? If you do if is to be hoped th:it there will be an early steamer from Hokitika to Greymputh.

The leet of candidates for election as merabeifc for the Hokitika district has been reduced by the 'retirement and departure of Mr Hoo?. Mr Hoos was never very prominent as a candidate. He vras rather the reverse. He simply ijitimated that he was a candidate, and |ie palled meetings which might have been attended more largely had there been a belief that he had seme chance of. being returned, and that he had a JSYJyfb. tp go further than merely being a candidate. He has now goue further, and it is to be hoped that he

will not fare worse. Mr Hoos is a man j possessing much quiet good sense, and, as County Chairman, he showed at least ability apd integrity equal to what was sho^n by his, succesapr, who was elevated to v the title pf Honorable and tp hgnqrarium fpr lite. If tbe comparison is insulting to him, it is bj' no tneftn.Bffle.ant;, Thp.ygh sot enjoying the honors or the honorarium, he is none the leßß the honorable Mr Hoos. But, however capable of occupying tbe position of County Chairman, Mr Hoos does not possess, neither does he pretend to the possession of, the qualities of a representative of " the, British public." His sentiments, notwithstanding hjs experience in that free, and fighting country, Seotlaml, are more consonant with what prevails on the Continent than with what prevails in the mixed and free country which we, cqmmonJy call Kngland. If Mr Hoos has left Hokitika with the object of qbfaiping or fulfilling an appointment suitable to his acquirements, he has done the best thing for himself and the country. By remaining here as a candidate he would have done no good for himself or the country. He is a man pf sterling worth iv employment suitable to his experience; there are feyy men more stiff or sterling in character; but he fails in not having- the faults or the features of a popular representative.

The West Coast Times appears to be gettiDg into trouble with its contemporaries. According to the Ross Gttctrdian, it is, " to say the least of it, childish." There has been no suspicion on the part of the proprietors that there are any children on the premises. It may be that the Times on account oi its age, is reaching " second childhood." However that may be, this is what the Guardian says :—: —

Our contemporary the West Coast Times has published some remarks on this election. With a part of them we agree, but from the remainder we dissent. It would be better that the candidate's assent to the nomination should be handed to the Returning Officer in writing ; and it seems unreasonable that, when only one member has to be elected, the same voter should have the power of proposing or seconding more than one candidate, But the doubt thrown by the West Coas; Times on the legality of tbe proceeding, as the law at present stands, is, to say the least of it, childish. So also is the objection that the Returning Officer stood on [a. box instead of a properly constructed hustings. So also are the remarks with reference to the lf unnecessary expense" of the election. To us it seems that the Returning Officer has throughout the proceedings acted strictly up to his duty, and not one inch beyond. He stood on a box because, owing to ihe way in which the ground sloped he was thus placed high enough above the crowd; and the hustings would have cost some pounds sterling, whereas the box cost nothing. He did not ask for the candidate's assent, because such a question would have been clearly illegal ; and he allowed the same voter to second two candidates because to have refused would have been equally illegal. Frpm the day of nomination to the close of the poll, and with regard to every part of ihe district, the greatest care seems to have been taken that no hitch should occur, and that, at the same time, due regard should be had to economy.

On the bigger principles referred to by our contemporary an opportunity will probably arise for allusion at another time. But, about that box, the fact is that what was published was quoted, and acknowledged, from the Guardian. There was no insinuation meant or stated as to the conduct of the Returning Officer in the particulars referred to. It was the defects of the law that were spoken of. There is no doubt of it that the Returning Officer did not act " one inch beyond his duty." Perhaps it was a few inches the other way.

At the Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday, a man charged with lunacy was ordered to be discharged from custody. Henry Sharpe who did not appear, was fined 5s and coßts, for permitting a vehicle to ply for hire without a license. A person appeared in answer to a summons for maintenance, taken out by his wife. The complainant did npo appear. Mr Button for the defendant said he was anxious for the case to go on. As the complainant did not appear, he applied for coats as the defendant might otherwise be continually annoyed. The Magistrate in dismissing the case declined to allow costs, as it was the first summons taken out by the complainant. A considerable number of civil cases were postponed, owing to the summonses not having been served. Several civil cases of no public interest but which occupied the Court for a considerable time, were disposed of, after which the Court adjourned until next day at the usual hour.

Mr R. J. Seddon will address the electors this evening, at the Marquiß of Lome Hotel, Hampden-street; the chair to be taken at eight o'clock.

Mr Jamep, collector of the Education rate, appeared yesterday at the Magistrate's Court as plaintiff in a number of cases for the recovery of the rate. In the majority of instances the money was paid into Court. Another batch of summonses will be issued tOrday.

The polling fpr the Grey Valley election of two gentlemen to represent the district in Parliament, takes place to-day.

Mr Reid's committee are requested to meet at eight o'clock this evening at the Empire Hotel, to make final arrangements to secure his return.

Mr Scddou addressed the electors of the Eight-mile last evening, at Gaylor's store. The candidate was well received, and, at the conclusion of the address, a vote of confidence was, on the motion of Mr Douglas, carried unanimously.

To-day at Goldsborough, for the third time, Mr Seddon, Eeturning Officer at the late Arahura Road Board election, has to appear in answer to an information laid by Patrick Moran against him for a breach of the Regulation? of Election Act. The case iras. set dpjp n fpr hearing in December, and was adjourned by Mr Fitzgerajd to allow the

complainant's solicitor to be present. On the second occasion, Wednesday la9t, complainant's and defendant's solicitors were present, but the Resident Magistrate was not. To-day, tn.ird attempt to depose pi tb,i9 case w.jl} be, jna^e, if the Resident M^Utt&Ul kaPE§Sa to arrive at Qpldsb^rougb in time to adjudicate upon it. An application for a further adjournment is to be

made by Moran.

The aspect of political matters in the Grey Valley ia thus described by the Argus:— Great preparations are heing made for the forthcoming polling day in the gold-fields towns. All the available " talent " out of luck, or out of harness, has been engaged to lend a hand, either as deputy-returning officers, poll clerks, scrutineers, " buttoners," or committee whips, and in other capacities for the memorable occasion. Shanty-keepers are laying in freßh supplies, hotel-keepers are providing more extensive accommodation, and, in short, everybody seems happy in expectancy, except tfie unfortunate candidates themselves, who all wear an appearance the reverse of hilarious.

A smart trick of dishonesty, perpetrated under the cloak of innocency, by a heathen Chinee happened a few days ago at a railway (station in Otago. A number of Chinamen (sixteen in all) were going by rail, and one of their number, acting as head man, applied for the requisite number of second-class tickets. The ticket clerk took the correct amount for sixteen tickets, but in the hurry of business, issued twenty-two. Before., the train started, a Chinaman— presumedly, the man to whom the twenty-two tickets had been given— returned to the ticket office, and holding up six tickets, said, " Friends no go ; me want money back." The clerk, unconscious of having issued more tickets than had been paid for, simply objected on commercial grounds to return the money ; but the Chinaman was dull of comprehension, except on one point, — " Me want money back," and it was "no savey " to anything else ; so at last the clork gave way, and returned (as he thought) some £6 odd, the price of six tickets. Just as the time was up, and the train about starting, the swindle was discovered, and the clerk attempted to find the culprit, but in vain, for the train was lull of passengers, and the Chinamen were spread about in different carriages ; besides, the faces of the Chinamen were so much alike that the rogue could not be identified, and of course it was " no s*vey " all round.

The Gipps Land Mercury relates that " a few days ago, while two gentlemen were fishing in the ' long waterhole' near the Hill Top, they were astonished to see an animal of a curious shape on the bank. Tney had hardly perceived it when it darted into the water, and swam rapidly to the other side of the morass. They had time enough, however, to note its appearance, and this is the description given. It is about the size of a large calf, ia covered with hair, and baa on its back just at the shoulders, two large humps. Its motion on land appeared as if the tail was the propellling power. The peculiar phenomenon caused the fishers to make inquiries, and they ascertained tha? Bometicnes night was made hideous by the roaring of a calf, and further they were told thatjthe blacks have been afraid to approach the waterhole for a loag time past. A gentleman, who was a resident of Queensland for some time, having heard the description of the animal, thiu.es that it is identical with the bunyip."

Mrs Reeves, living near Bridgewater, was bitten by a snake on December 18, and might have lost her life but for an act of resolution and nerve on her part which is seldom recorded of a woman. The Bendigo Advertiser relates. " That the woman went iuto one of the paddocks on her farm to cut thistles for the pigs, using a tomahawk for the purpose, and whilst in the act of handling one of the thistles befpre chopping, a rather large-sized diamond snake that was curled round it rose up and bit her on the end of the little finger of the right hand. Without a moment's hesitation she ran to a log, placed thereon the bitten digit, and struck it clean off with the tomawhawk at the middle joint. On some friends going to her assistance she was well plied with brandy and quickly taken to the Inglewood Hospita} in a buggy, and ou arrival Dr Starke amputated a small piece of bone, after which the woman did not appear to be much the worae for having been bitten by a poisonous reptile; in fact she showed no signs of ppisoping and required no treatment for it f sp rapid had she been in the use of the tomahawk."

The following telegram, dated Wellington, January 10th, receive* prominence in the Ross Guardian. It was received by Mr Cuming from Mr Tribe :— Mr O'Connor's report of the meeting was received yesterday by the Minister of Public Works. It says, " I wpuld recommend that the long tunnel should be pushed ahead with all possible speed, and also that the remainder of the works should be left in abeyance until it is necessary to oommence them in order to have them completed contemporaneously with the tunnel, viz. — until the tunnel is half through or thereabouts." The matter will be brought before the Cabinet at the next meeting, when the tunnel will he authorised ; but the works on the Ross side of it would not be of value till th^e water could be got through the tunnel.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18760112.2.5

Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1876., West Coast Times, Issue 3213, 12 January 1876

Word Count
2,685

West Coast Times. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1876. West Coast Times, Issue 3213, 12 January 1876

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