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MID.-LEN T IN PARIS.

(corresponded otago daily tidies.)

Mid-Lent passed 6fF very Tbe French of late seem to resemble the English — as described by Froissart — who took their pleasure sadly. Two or three serious "cdttce"f ts" took place nightly. To say nothing of the forenoon, ey^niqg parties are limited to eau sucre ?nd small talk,

and it is ojdy by"steaiith that young people can improvise a hop after the sober people have retired, bestowing a homily and a benedietlon oij thpsg resolved not to go some till mo^i|^ JPew visits are made during Lent; tbe elegantes only appear in the afternoon, and not at all \n wardrobe glory. As to abstinence, it would appear that a good many persons fast at home, the better to get up an appetite for the pastrycook shops. Four to five o'clock is the. hour for lunch in Paris, and what a consumption of sandwiches, foiegras, slices, of salmon, oyster pates, mince pies, light puddings, and bahas or other orthdpx refreshments, to prove how little men — and, above all, ladies — want here below. On an ayerage, the proprietor of a pastry shop retires from business in the course of six years, having made a fortune. It is the habit of clients to lunch by instalments, by patronising several shops in rotation, and thus enlarging the prospect, of seehig and being seen. Mid-Lent is the annual, and the only, holiday for laundresses,ag Good Friday is for the butchers. They select their king in proportion as he is rich, and the queen for her beauty and virtue; A procession — which hasjust taken place, follows, and a ball comes off at midnight, preceded by a general visit to the theatres. The king has no sivil list ; the insignia of his office are a rosette and a silver badge, her majesty displays only bouquets, and her crown consists of white caineiia?; no duchess in France can surpaass the elegance of her toilette, except in the choice of richer materials, which, however, do not inprease in attractiveness. The corporation of laundresses, is one of the most extensive and powerful in Paris ; their establishments are as numerous as the wineshops. It is a very humble concern that does not gain over 120 francs per week ; with a good hotel connection, 1500 francs per week may be received, and which represents the employment of 20 women, whose average wages is 2J francs per day ; coffee morning and afternoon according to the severity of work. There are two classes of laundresses, first, that comprising the women who wash ; and the second, mostly girls in their teens, those who iron and make up the linen. . It is in this clas3 that men compete with women, and is a spectacle much more ludicrous than Monsieur making up your room, discharging the duties of man -house-maid On the Seine are monster floating washing establishments, farmed by companies, and in addition a certain number grat itous.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18730527.2.13

Bibliographic details

MID.-LENT IN PARIS., West Coast Times, Issue 2387, 27 May 1873

Word Count
489

MID.-LENT IN PARIS. West Coast Times, Issue 2387, 27 May 1873

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